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Full text of "Environmental analysis record for proposed oil and gas leasing"

BLM LIBRARY 




88013695 



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PROPERTY OF 

Bureau of Land Management 
DSC LIBRARY 



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Denver F«a^«-** 
P o. Bo*Bw*7 „ 
p««r, CO 80888- 

CONTENTS 

Page 

I PROPOSED ACTION ... 1 

Purpose 1 

Objective 1 

Time Frame 1 

Background 1 

Proposed Action 11 

Alternative 30 

II EXISTING ENVIRONMENT 31 

Physiographic Units 31 

Climate 31 

Non-Living Components 32 

Living Components 57 

Ecological Interrelationships 80 

Human Values 83 

III ANALYSIS OF PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES .... 93 

Preface 93 

Anticipated Environmental Impacts of Proposed 

Action . 94 

Anticipated Environmental Impacts of Alternative . . 102 

Possible Mitigating or Enhancing Measures 102 

Recommendations for Mitigation or Enhancement . . . 109 

Residual Impacts 116 

Relationship Between Short-Term Use and Long-Term 

Productivity 119 

Irreversible and Irretrievable Commitment of 

Resources 122 

IV PERSONS, GROUPS AND PUBLIC AGENCIES CONSULTED .... 123 

V INTENSITY OF PUBLIC INTEREST 125 

VI PARTICIPATING STAFF . . . 127 

VII SUMMARY CONCLUSION 129 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 131 



-^ PROPERTY OF 
Bureau of Land Management 



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ILLUSTRATIONS 
Figures Page 

1. General Location Map, Oil and Gas Lease 
Applications 13 

2. Flowing Oil Production Facilities 25 

3. Cross Sectional Diagram of Typical 
Landforms that occur in Coos Bay District, 

Soil Inventory Area 39 

4. Block Diagram showing Relationship between 
Soil Series and Landform in Type I Terrain 

of the Flournoy and Tyee Formations .... 41 

5. Block Diagram Showing Relationship Between 
Soil Series and Landform in Type II Terrain 
of the Tyee, Lookingglass, Roseburg and 

Elkton Formations 43 

6. Stratigraphic Chart for the Southern Oregon 
Coastal Region 47 

7. Areal Distribution of Geologic Formations 

in the Lease Area 55 

8. General Location Map- -Coniferous Forest Zones 61 

Tables 

1. Soil Associations in the Analysis Area . . 35 

2. Geologic Materials and Associated Soils . . 53 

3. Anadromous Fish Migration, Spawning and 
Incubation Periods, Oregon Coastal Streams 67 

4. Game Fish found in Analysis Area 71 

5. Oregon Coastal Employment, Unemployment 
and Indices of Specialization by Subarea 

- 1970 . 89 

6. Income Data - United States, Oregon Coastal 
Area and Subareas - 1969 91 



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APPENDIX 



I Orders and Cooperative Procedures - Drilling Mud 
Materials 

II Regulations, Examples of Stipulations Applicable 
to Oil and Gas Operations 

III Location Maps 

IV Legal Descriptions 

V Soil Association Descriptions 

VI Location Maps - Fragile Sites, Roads, Critical 
Wildlife Habitat Areas 

VII Plant List 

VIII Animal List 

IX Phases and Discrete Operations 

X Well Fires, Blowouts, Crude Oil Spills 

XI News Releases, Mailing List 

XII Statewide Overview of Possible Development on 
Federal Oil and Gas Leases in Oregon 



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This regulation does not pertain to lands where the 
Federal government owns the mineral rights but not the 
surface rights. When he signs the notice of intent form, 
the geophysical operator agrees to conduct the explo- 
ration activities according to terms and conditions 
designed to minimize adverse impacts. The operator must 
also file a bond before entering the land. 

When a notice of intent is received, a district staff 
specialist reviews the proposed operation and may meet 
with the operator in an effort to minimize the environ- 
mental effects of the surveys. 

Upon completion of operations, the operator must restore 
the area as nearly as practicable to its original con- 
dition. 

Pre-Lease Procedures 



(1) Land Use Planning . BLM's land use planning process 
(BLM Manual 1601-1608) is based on the concept of 
multiple use of the land. The Coos Bay District 
Management Framework Plan was updated in 1973. This 
plan was based on the 1969 standards, and is cur- 
rently being revised to new standards adopted in 
1975. The District Management Framework Plan is 
based on the protection of soil and water--the basic 
resources. The District plan does not prohibit oil 
and gas exploration and/or production, but oil and 
gas operations must be an acceptable and appropriate 
land use within the guidelines of the District 
Management Framework Plan. 

(2) Environmental Analysis . Before a decision is made 
to issue oil and gas leases for specific areas, the 
BLM prepares an environmental analysis record. 
After a lease is issued, Environmental Analysis will 
be made by the Geological Survey before a permit is 
issued to drill a well or enter the land. This 
second environmental document, although prepared by 
Geological Survey will have a considerable amount of 
BLM input. This BLM input will incorporate BLM land 
use guides and surface protection requirements into 
the Environmental Analysis prepared by Geological 
Survey . 



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Both environmental documents will describe the 
setting in which the action is to occur, pos- 
sible environmental impacts of the proposed 
action, and measures to reduce adverse impacts 
of the proposed action. 

The 24 applications considered in this EAR are 
among 212 applications on file as of February 
9, 1976, for federal oil and gas leases in 
Oregon. The applications are located in seven 
BLM districts, and each district office will 
prepare an Environmental Analysis Record before 
decisions are reached on the applications. A 
statewide overview of the development which 
might occur if the leases are issued is in- 
cluded in Appendix XII. 

(3) Lease Stipulations . Information gathered in 
the land use planning and environmental analysis 
processes and other data are used by BLM to 
determine whether oil and gas leases will be 
issued for specific lands and, if so, the 
special conditions or stipulations to which the 
prospective lessees will have to agree prior to 
the issuance of the leases. Most of the special 
stipulations in oil and gas leases issued in 
recent years relate to the prevention or miti- 
gation of unfavorable environmental impacts. 

All oil and gas leases issued by BLM at the 
present time contain an open-ended set of 
stipulations. These stipulations insure that 
after the lease is issued, USGS and BLM have 
additional opportunities to specify measures 
the lessee must take to protect environmental 
values. 

Oil and gas leases may also contain site- 
specific stipulations. These stipulations are 
developed individually for each lease area. 

(4) Classification Report. Before a lease is 
issued, a classification report is prepared to 
determine whether the lease will be issued on a 
competitive or noncompetitive basis. Competitive 
leases are issued within Known Geologic Structures 
(KGS's) and noncompetitive leases are issued 
outside KGS's. 



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No known geologic structures have been identified 
in Oregon. 

The Geological Survey prepares a classification 
report on noncompetitive oil and gas lease appli- 
cations to determine whether all or any parts of 
the area applied for are within a known geologic 
structure. An area is classified as being within 
a known geologic structure if it is within the 
trap, stratigraphic or structural, of a producing 
oil and gas field as best as can be determined 
from the geologic data available at the time. If 
the area is in a KGS, it is not available for 
leasing until it is offered at a competitive lease 
sale. 

Prior to writing the Environmental Analysis Record, 
the State Historic Preservation Officer will be 
requested to conduct a search of properties listed 
on the National Historical Registry, and to respond 
with a list of known archeological sites, if any, 
that exist within the lease application areas. 

d. Lease Issuance 

If a tract has not been previously leased, a decision to 
issue a lease will be made after an environmental anal- 
ysis. A lease is issued on a non-competitive basis to the 
first applicant if the land is legally available, if the 
U. S. Geological Survey determines that the land is not 
in a KGS, and if BLM has determined through land use 
planning and environmental analysis that oil and gas 
development is an acceptable and appropriate land use. 

When leases outside KGS's expire or terminate or are 
relinquished or cancelled, land use plans and environ- 
mental analyses are reviewed to determine whether the 
tracts should be reoffered for leasing and, if so, the 
kind of stipulations to be added to the new lease. The 
tracts are reoffered by being posted on a monthly list. 
All applications for the posted tracts received during 
the filing period are considered to have been filed 
simultaneously. A public drawing is held, and one 
application is drawn for each tract. 

If there are no simultaneous applications for a tract, 
it becomes available to the first application submitted 
subsequent to the drawing. Noncompetitive leases are 
currently issued for a primary term of 10 years. 



Since Oregon has no KGS areas at this time, no 
competitive leasing is scheduled in the state. 

Lessees must furnish bonds conditioned upon com- 
pliance with the lease stipulations. Bonds must be 
furnished before a competitive lease is issued and 
before a drilling permit is issued on a noncom- 
petitive lease. 

Post-Lease Procedures 



During the term of the lease, the Geological Survey 
supervises operations of the lessee in that portion 
of the lease tract within the "area of operations." 
(See Secretarial Order 2948 in Appendix I-A-l for a 
definition of the area of operations.) The Geo- 
logical Survey acts on requests from lessees for 
approval of plans for drilling or other operations. 
BLM administers the oil and gas leasing regulations 
and terms of the lease in that portion of the lease 
tract outside the area of operations. This may 
include such items as access roads for the lease 
area that are constructed outside of the leased 
area. 

The "open-ended" lease stipulation requires the 
lessee, prior to entry upon the land, to submit for 
approval to the Geological Survey a map and surface 
use plan explaining the nature of the anticipated 
activity and surface disturbance. The lessee also 
submits this information to BLM if the lessee 
proposes to conduct any activities which would 
disturb the environment. He will be required to 
obtain approval from the Survey at least once during 
the life of the lease. If he finds oil or gas and 
wishes to drill additional wells to develop the 
field or construct facilities needed to reach full 
production, he will be required to return to the 
Survey for approval of plans for each new stage of 
development. The information the lessee must 
furnish in the surface use plan is listed in the 
Geological Survey's Notice to Lessees number 6 (NTL- 
6); a copy is included in Appendix II-l. 

For all exploratory well proposals, the USGS prepares 
an Environmental Analysis in consultation with BLM. 
The Geological Survey may also hold a joint field 
inspection with the operator and BLM to analyze the 
environmental impacts of the proposed action. 
Stipulations are attached to the drilling permit to 
minimize adverse environmental impacts. The lessee mav 
be asked to change the proposed well site if drilling in 



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the original location would have severe adverse 
environmental impacts. 

If oil or gas is discovered, lessees are required to 
submit additional lease development plans and permits 
to the Geological Survey for approval. After USGS has 
reviewed the proposed plans and permit applications and 
has consulted with and received input from BLM, the 
proposed plans are modified, if necessary, to insure 
that proper construction practices are followed. The 
lessee is required to prepare for contingencies such as 
fires, accidents, blowouts, spills, and leaks, and to 
notify various State and Federal agencies, such as the 
Environmental Protection Agency, in the event of an oil 
leak or spill. 

The Geological Survey is responsible for final approval 
of abandonment operations when oil and gas operations 
are terminated. The Geological Survey will not approve 
the abandonment unless reclamation is carried out to 
the satisfaction of BLM. When abandonment or cessation 
of operations results in expiration, cancellation, or 
relinquishment of the lease, the Geological Survey 
requests BLM to inspect the leasehold area for compliance 
with the surface protection and reclamation stipulations 
in the lease and drilling permit. The lessee is re- 
quired to reclaim the area insofar as practicable to its 
condition prior to the oil and gas operations. 

3. Regulation of Oil and Gas Operations by the State of Oregon 

Oregon's first oil and gas law was passed in 1923 and was 
administered by the counties. It prohibited waste of the 
resource and required plugging upon abandonment of wells. 
Regulatory authority was transferred to the Department of 
Geology and Mineral Industries in 1949. A comprehensive oil 
and gas conservation act was passed in 1953, patterned after 
the Interstate Oil Compact Commission model. Rules promul- 
gated under the 1949 Act require bonding, blow-out prevention 
equipment, controlled disposal of brines, and cementing and 
casing of wells. The law also set well spacing limits and 
provided for the protection of correlative rights of land- 
owners . 



Oregon became an associate member of the Interstate Oil 
Compact Commission in 1954 and has since adopted many of the 
policies and model rules suggested by this group of state 
regulatory agencies. In 1961, the Legislature passed a 
unitization law which defines conditions for forming field- 
wide operating units, provides for settlements between working 
interests, and allows compulsory unitization when 75% of the 
royalty ownership favors unit operations. The Department of 
Geology and Mineral Industries approves casing programs, 
inspects blow-out prevention equipment, witnesses abandonment 
plugging, and collects well records. In the event of a dis- 
covery, the Department's rules require uniform development and 
regular reporting of storage and production. Stipulations 
added to the drilling permit at the request of the State 
Department of Environmental Quality require compliance with 
state air and water quality laws. 

Before drilling permits are issued, the applications are 
reviewed by the Department of Environmental Quality, Water 
Resources Department, Fish and Wildlife Department, and the 
Department of Land Conservation and Development. 

4. Summary of Standard Mitigating Measures 

The preceding sections on Federal leasing procedures and State 
regulation of oil and gas operations refer to regulations and 
standard notice forms and stipulations which would apply to 
all geophysical explorations for oil and gas and/or activities 
of oil and gas lessees on national resource lands in Oregoi 
The notice forms, stipulations, and regulations are summari H 
below and are included in Appendix II. 

a. "Notice of Intent to Conduct Oil and Gas Exploration 
Operations," BLM Form 3040-1. Geophysical exploration 
companies are required to complete this form before 
conducting geophysical operations on national resource 
lands. The form contains terms and conditions under 
which the operations must be conducted. More detailed 
conditions may be established to meet the unique require- 
ments of the area where operations will be conducted. 
(See Appendix I I -A) . 



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b. Section 2, paragraph (q) of the Federal oil and gas lease 
form (BLM Form 3120-7), "Protection of Surface, Natural 
Resources, and Improvements." (See Appendix II-B) . 

c. BLM Form 3109-5, "Surface Disturbance Stipulations." 
These are the "open-ended" stipulations referred to in 
Sections 1.D.2 of this EAR. They are made a part of each 
oil and gas lease issued by BLM at the present time. 
These stipulations insure that, after the lease is 
issued but before drilling operations are started, USGS 
and BLM have additional opportunities to establish 
conditions which the lessee will have to meet. (See 
Appendix II-C) . Site specific stipulations are also 
developed individually for each lease. Examples of site 
specific stipulations are included in Appendix II-D. 

d. "Cultural Resource Stipulation to Oil and Gas Leases." 
This is the cultural resource protection stipulation 
included in all oil and gas leases issued in Oregon at 
the present time. (See Appendix II-E) . 

e. 30 CFR 221. These are the Geological Survey's Oil and 
Gas Operating Regulations. Among other things, they 
include requirements relating to well casing, well 
abandonment, and other mitigative measures. 

f . Geological Survey Notices to Lessees and Operators of 
Federal Oil and Gas Leases. Notices to lessees and 
operators ("NTL's") transmit the Geological Survey's 
operating requirements to lessees. 

(1) NTL-2B prescribes requirements for the handling, 
storing, and disposal of water produced from oil 
and gas wells. (See Appendix II-F) 

(2) NTL-3 requires lessees to report discharges of 
pollutants and accidents and prescribes the contents 
of the reports. (See Appendix II-G) . 

(3) NTL-4 requires lessees to pay royalties on oil 
and gas lost because of blowouts, fires, or other 
reasons. (See Appendix II-H). 



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(4) NTL-6 formalizes the requirement by the 

Geological Survey that an oil and gas operator 
furnish a surface use and operating plan to the 
Survey and BLM and receive approval before entering 
the lease to conduct drilling operations. USGS and 
BLM use information in the surface use plan and 
other data collected by the agencies to develop 
environmental protection measures . The measures 
are included as conditions of the drilling permit 
issued by USGS. (See Appendix II-I) . 

40 CFR 112. These U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 
regulations identify procedures, methods, and equipment 
to be used to prevent the discharge of oil from non- 
transportation-related onshore and offshore facilities 
into navigable waters. The regulations apply to owners 
and operators of facilities engaged in oil and gas 
drilling, producing, gathering, storing, and other non- 
transportation-related activities. Oil and gas operators 
are required in the regulations to prepare Spill Pre- 
vention Control and Countermeasure Plans. 

40 CFR 1510. These Environmental Protection Agency 
regulations contain the National Oil and Hazardous 
Substances Pollution Contingency Plan. As stated in the 
regulations, the plan provides for a pattern of coordin- 
ated and integrated response by Departments and Agencies 
of the Federal Government to protect the environment from 
the damaging effects of pollution discharges. It promotes 
the coordination and direction of Federal and State 
response systems and encourages the development of loci 
government and private capabilities to handle such 
discharges. 

In addition to these Federal regulations, stipulations, 
and administrative procedures relating to Federal lands, 
an oil and gas operation in Oregon would be subject to 
State laws and regulations regarding pollution control. 
State laws and regulations are described in Section D.3 
of Part I, "Regulation of Oil and Gas Operations by the 
State of Oregon." 

Chapter 632 of the Oregon Administrative Rules. These 
are the Department of Geology and Mineral Industries ' 
regulations on oil and gas operations. (See Appendix 
II-J) 



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j. "Special Conditions to Apply to All Deep Well Exploratory 
Drilling in Oregon." The Departments of Environmental 
Quality and Geology and Mineral Industries agreed in 
September 1975 that these stipulations would be made a 
part of future drilling permits issued by Oregon Depart- 
ment of Geology and Mineral Industries. (See Appendix 
II-K). 

IDENTIFICATION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION 

The following proposed action ranges from preliminary investi- 
gations on oil and gas leases to production and abandonment. The 
following proposed action assumes that production and abandonment 
and operations preceding these items will take place on the lease 
areas. There is no way to know at this point just how far the 
operations will progress if the leases are issued. As mentioned 
in the preceding background information, more specific surface pro- 
tection stipulations will be put into effect if and when drilling 
permits are applied for. 

1 . Location 

The lease applications are located in the Coos Bay, Oregon 
District, BLM, in eastern Coos and western Douglas counties. 
The general lease areas are divided into three parts: the 
Loon Lake Area, the Callahan Area, and the Coquille River 
Area. The locations of the general lease application areas 
are shown in figure 1. The specific location on federal land 
of the oil and gas lease applications on the Coos Bay District 
are shown on the maps in Appendix III. Individual lease 
applications are identified on these maps by serial numbers. 
Copies of the legal description of the lease applications are 
in Appendix IV. 



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Lease applications, Oregon serial numbers and approximate acreage are as 
follows: 

Loon Lake Area 



Lease Application No. 



OR 9756 
OR 9757 
OR 9758 
OR 9759 
OR 9760 
OR 13422 



Acres (Rounded) 

1753 
2226 
2210 
1718 
2377 
716 



Total 
Callahan Area 



11000 



Lease Application No. 

*0R 13387 
OR 13388 



Acres (Rounded 

40 
1923 



Total 



1963 



Coquille River Area 



Lease Application No . 

*0R 13304 

OR 13308 

OR 13309 

*0R 13378 

OR 13391 

OR 13392 

OR 13393 

OR 13405 

OR 13406 

OR 13407 

OR 13408 

OR 13409 

OR 13410 

OR 13411 

OR 13412 

OR 13413 

OR 13414 

OR 13415 

OR 13416 



Acres (Rounded) 



786 



Total 



1208 
1932 
636 
1282 
1600 
2406 
1341 
1317 
2560 
2560 
2120 
2410 
2408 
2520 
2560 
2560 
2361 
1882 
36161 



* These lease applications overlap with the BLM Roseburg District, and 
will be included in the Roseburg EAR as Roseburg has the larger per- 
centage of acreage in these applications. 



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MbUKh 1. GENERAL LOCATION MAP 

OIL $ GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
COOS BAY DISTRICT 
|\ T. 19-34 S., R. 7-16 W. , Wi^Jder. 



\. 



FLORENCE 



WORTH 6£WD 
CO05 BA 1 / 




BAwdoM 



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2. Size 

The lease applications embrace an area of approximately 
49,000 acres of National Resource Lands, which includes 
approximately 30,400 acres of revested Oregon and California 
Railroad land (0§C) , approximately 16,100 acres of revested 
Coos Bay Wagon Road land (CBWR) and approximately 2600 
acres of Public Domain land (PD) . 

3. Oil and Gas Operations 

Oil and gas operations progress through five stages of im- 
plementation or phases: 

Preliminary Investigations 

Exploratory Drilling 

Development 

Production 

Abandonment 

Several phases may occur simultaneously in an area. An 
exploratory well may be drilled on a lease while preliminary 
investigations are being conducted elsewhere on the area; 
however, usually only one stage will be implemented at one 
time on a given lease area. 

Exploratory wells are drilled on a small percentage of the 
area covered by preliminary investigations. 

a. Preliminary Investigations . 

Preliminary investigations often precede the issuance of 
a lease. They are described in this section to provide 
an overview of the entire range of oil and gas operations, 

Preliminary investigations begin with an office review 
of geological and technical data available for the region. 
In many oil and gas producing regions, an office analysis 
may develop enough information to proceed with drilling 
without conducting additional preliminary investigations. 
However, the office analysis may indicate only a broad 
prospective area, and further preliminary investigations 
may be required. 

Preliminary investigations are made from the air or on 
the ground. 



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(1) Airborne investigations . Small aircraft and 
helicopters are used to conduct visual reconnais- 
sance, photographic and geophysical surveys. 

(2) Surface Investigations . On-the-ground geological 
and geophysical surveys may involve either casual or 
intensive use of the lnad. Casual uses generally do 
not disturb the surface. Intensive uses include opera- 
tions which require clearing of new access trails, move- 
ment of heavy equipment, or other actions which can 
result in substantial surface disturbance. Geo- 
logical, geochemical, and soil-gas surveys normally 

do not involve a disturbance of the surface. 
Seismic surveys, one of the most frequently used 
methods of geophysical investigation, often require 
the clearing of new access trails and the movement 
of heavy equipment. 

In seismic surveys, a shock wave is sent into the 
subsurface and the time required for the wave to 
travel to and return from a subsurface horizon is 
recorded. A map of the subsurface can be drawn 
from an analysis of the differences in the time it 
takes the wave to be reflected back to the surface 
from the various rock formations. 

Explosive, thumper or vibrator methods are used to 
produce the shock wave. 

In the explosive method, shot holes are drilled t 
a depth of 50 to 200 feet. Four to twelve holes 
are drilled per mile of line. The holes are loadea 
with 5 to 50 pounds of explosives and detonated. 
The same hole may be reloaded and shot several times 
to find the depth and explosive charge returning 
the best reflection or refraction signal. 

The thumper and vibrator methods pound or vibrate 
the earth to create a shock wave. Less than 50 
square feet of surface area is required to operate 
the equipment at each test site. 



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Production 

Flowing oil production facilities are 
illustrated in Figure 2. 

(1) Well Facilities 

(a) Oil Fields . Pressures in some 
petroleum reservoirs are great 
enough to force oil to the sur- 
face. The result is a flowing 
well. However, most oil wells in the 
United States require the use of 
some means of artificial lift to 
bring the oil to the surface. 
Pumping and a technique known as 
"gas lift" are the two methods of 
artificial lift used at present. 
Flowing wells and wells with gas 
lift facilities require a minimum 
of equipment at the surface 
and produce little or no sound. 
All pump systems require more 
surface equipment and create 
more noise than flowing wells 
and gas lift facilities. 

i. Flowing Wells . The surface 
equipment at the head of a 
flowing well may be limited 
to a series of valves, or 
"Christmas tree" and a 
fenced service area ranging 
from 15-by-15 to 50-by-50 feet 
around the wellhead and Christmas 
tree. 

ii. Artificial Lifts. 



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(i) Pumping . Over 90 percent 
of the oil wells in the 
United States in 1971 
were on artificial lift, and 
most of the artificial 
lift wells used sucker rod 



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pumps. Other pumps com- 
monly used on oil wells are 
hydraulic and centrifugal 
pumps. 

All of the pump systems 
require some surface 
equipment and fuel or 
electric power lines. All 
generate some noise, 
ranging from almost none 
for electric motors to high 
noise levels for single 
cylinder gas engines. 

(ii) Gas Lift . Gas lift is used 
in some oil fields where 
low cost, high pressure 
natural gas is available 
and where pressure in the 
petroleum reservoir is 
sufficient to force the 
petroleum part of the 
way up the well. The 
addition of gas lowers 
the specific gravity 
of the petroleum so that 
it flows to the surface. 
The system is quiet and 
uses little ground. 
However, it will be used 
less in the future as 
supplies of high pressure 
natural gas decline. 



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Figure 2. 



tSJ 

On 




FLOWING OIL PRODUCTION 

Well and Flow Lines • Separation and Storage • Salt Water Disposal 




LEGEND 

1 OIL RESERVOIR 

2 PRODUCING WELL 

3 TEST SEPARATOR 

4 PRODUCTION SEPARATOR 

5 FLOW TREATER 

6 STOCK TANK 

I CRUDE OIL GATHERING LINE 

8 GAS TO GASOLINE PLANT, SALES 
OR OTHER USES 

9 SALT WATER DISPOSAL TANK 
TO FILTER 

II SALT WATER DISPOSAL WELL 
1! PIPELINE GAUGES 

13 LEASE PUMPER 

14 CIRCULATING PUMP 

15 GAS METER 

16 CHEMICAL INJECTION 

17 EMERGENCY SALT WATER PIT 



FAClLrTIES IN A FLOWING OIL FIELD 



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(b) Gas Fields . Most gas wells produce 
by normal flow and do not require 
pumping. Surface use at flowing 
gas well usually is limited to a 
20-foot by 20-foot fenced area. If 
water enters a gas well and chokes 
off the gas flow, a pump may be 
installed to pump off the column of 
water. 

(2) Flowlines . Crude oil usually is trans- 
ferred from the wells to a central collec- 
tion point, or storage tank battery, 
before it is transported from the lease. 
Natural gas is often sold at the wellhead 
and transported directly off the lease. If 
processing is required to remove liquid 
hydrocarbons or water, however, the gas 
may be transferred to a central collection 
point prior to sale. 

Oil and gas are transferred from the wells 
to central collection points in flowlines. 
The flowlines usually are 3 or 4 inch diameter 
steel pipes. They may be buried, installed 
on the surface, or elevated. Rights-of-way 
for oil and gas flowlines are usually 10 
feet in width. 

Collection points are storage tanks that are 
used at one point for storage from several 
leases. This method is used instead of 
storing on each single lease. It is assumed 
that central collection points are not feasible 
on the Coos Bay District and will not be used. 
This assumption is based on discussions with 
oil company officials. 

(3) Separating, Treating and Storage Facilities 

If the fluids produced at the well contain 
gas and water, the oil, gas and water are 
separated before the oil is stored in the 
tank battery. The batteries usually contain 
at least two tanks and usually are located 
on or near the lease. 



27 



Small leases may contain only one tank 
battery; large leases may contain several, 
with each battery containing separating, 
treating and storage facilities. 

(4) Disposal of Produced Water . Although 
most water produced with oil and gas is 
brackish to highly saline, some produced 
water is fresh enough for beneficial 
surface use. Ranchers and farmers in some 
areas have filed prior rights claims on 
oilfield water so they can use it for 
agricultural purposes. 

Saline water is disposed of in evaporation 
pits or by subsurface injection. Evaporation 
pits are used mainly in arid regions where 
evaporations rates are high. In areas such 
as western Oregon where rainfall exceeds 
the evaporation rate, disposal by evaporation 
would not be feasible. 

When salt water is disposed of underground, 
it usually is introduced into a subsurface 
horizon containing water of equal or poorer 
quality. 

(5) Methods of Increasing Petroleum Recovery 

(a) Oil. Oil cannot be produced unless 
forces within the petroleum reservo. 
are great enough to drive the oil t< 
the well bore. Primary production 
occurs when energy in the reservoir 
is sufficient to drive the oil to the 
well. When natural energy sources are 
inadequate, secondary production 
methods involving gas or liquid 
injection may be used to supplement 
the natural forces. 

In water flooding, the most commonly 
employed form of secondary recovery, 
water is injected into the reservoir 
to drive additional oil to the pro- 
ducing wells. On the average, a 
successful waterflood will increase 
recovery by roughly lo to 100 percent. 



- 28 - 



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Other secondary techniques for impro- 
ving oil recovery have been tested, 
including miscible flooding (injecting 
chemical compounds with water) fire 
flooding (starting a controlled fire 
in the reservoir) and steam flooding 
(injecting steam into the reservoir). 
Some of the techniques have been used 
for tertiary recovery after a waterflood. 

Natural gas also is injected into some 
oil reservoirs during primary recovery 
as a pressure maintenance program. 

(b) Gas . In some gas condensate reservoirs, 
some of the components of the gas 
condense into liquid form near the well 
bores when production reduces pressures 
in the reservoir. The resulting re- 
duction in permeability may cause a 
significant loss in recovery. To 
prevent this, gas is injected to maintain 
pressure above the lower condensation 
pressure. 

(6) Employment . The number of people required to 
operate an oil or gas field varies with the 
characteristics of the production and the 
number of leaseholds in the field. If the 
wells flow without pumping, one employee in a 
large, modern field can control production 
of about 25 wells. When wells are pumped, 
one employee in a large modern field can 
control production on 10 to 20 wells. If 
oil storage tanks are manually gauged and 
sampled, one employee can service approxi- 
mately 25 tanks. If automatic gauging 
and sampling devices have been installed, 
one person can service the equivalent of 
100-150 tanks. In a large, modern field, 
one five-man maintenance crew can service 
up to 50 wells. 



29 



e. Abandonment 

(1) Exploratory and Development Wells . Dry 
wells normally are plugged before the 
drilling rig is removed. This allows 
the operator to use the drilling rig 

to plug the hole and avoid bringing in 
other equipment. After the drilling 
rig is removed, the surface, including 
the reserve mud pit, is restored to its 
original condition insofar as possible. 

(2) Production and Injection Wells and Related 
Facilities . Before a lessee abandons a 
former producing well, he must demonstrate 
its unsuitability for further profitable 
production to the Geological Survey 
District Engineer. In some cases, wells 
are plugged as soon as they are depleted. 
In other cases, depleted wells are not 
plugged immediately, but are allowed to 
stand idle for possible later use in a 
secondary recovery program. 

When an entire lease is abandoned, the 
separators, heater-treaters, tanks, and 
other processing and handling equipment 
are removed and the surface restored. 
Flowlines and injection lines installed on 
the surface are removed, but buried lines 
usually are left in place. The operator's 
bond with the Federal Government is not 
terminated until BLM has approved surface 
restorations, the Geological Survey has 
approved subsequent reports of abandonment, 
and royalties due the Federal Government 
have been received. 



ALTERNATIVES TO THE PROPOSED ACTION 



No Action 



No action as an alternative means that none of the leases will be 
issued. 

Surface protection items, such as no occupancy, and recommendations 
as to lease part of an area only, or to grant some leases while re- 
jecting others will be considered mitigating measures. Recommenda- 
tions will be based on the analysis. 



30 - 



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Streamside (riparian) vegetation is one example. Stream- 
side vegetation forms a network throughout all sub-biomes, 
varying considerably, and may include red alder (Alnus 
rubra), and where annual flooding occurs, willow (Salix spp.). 
Where streams are normally confined to their banks, stream- 
side vegetation is more typical of the surrounding vegetative 
type. In the EAR area, streamside vegetation includes shrubs, 
herbaceous plants, conifers and broadleafs along the upland 
streams. 

Located in the Northwest Coastal Coniferous Forest, the EAR 
area is situated in one of the most densely forested of 
coniferous forest sub-biomes. Within the sub-biomes 
dominated by coniferous vegetation, Franklin and Dyrness 
have identified five major vegetative (climax) zones. 
The study area is situated in the widespread Western Hemlock 
Zone. (Figure 8). The vegetative zones shown in Figure 
8 reflect climatic conditions inherent with elevational 
differences that occur throughout the Northwest Coastal area. 

The "cool-moist," "warm-dry" dichotomy relates to plant 
succession following removal of the coniferous forest. 
There is, for example, a tendency towards exclusion of 
conifers during a period of dominance by herbaceous 
plants following clearcutting and burning on the "warm- 
dry" sites within the Western Hemlock Zone. 

In the mature forests of the EAR area the Douglas-fir 
is easily the largest and most dominant species. In the 
Coquille River study area, until recently, stood the world's 
largest Douglas-fir tree, the "Finnegan Fir," a mammoth 
tree, 13 feet in diameter, and 300 feet tall. This tree, 
after a life span of 600-700 years, was a victim of the 
October, 1975 windstorm. Cedar trees of 6 to 8 feet in 
diameter and hemlock of 3 to 4 feet in diameter are not 
uncommon and both will occasionally grow even larger. 



59 



Understories in these forests where open canopies 
are found are usually composed of a lush mixture of 
shrubs, herbaceous plants, lichens, mosses, liverworts, 
and small shade tolerant conifers. Closed canopies 
have sparse understories and only extremely shade- 
tolerant plants are found such as: fungi, lichens, and 
mosses, etc. 

The EAR area helps to support a sustained yield timber 
harvest for the District's South Coast Master Unit. 
A mixture of logged lands in various stages of regrowth, 
pole timber, and virgin stands of old-growth are now 
found, forming a series of ecological communities, each 
differing in biotic development. 

Plants most commonly found in the EAR area are listed 
in Appendix VII. No rare or endangered species are 
known to exist on the study area. 



60 



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Figure 8. General 1 cation map coniferous forest zones 



2. Animals 



Aquatic 

Historically commercial and sport fishing has played 
an important role in the economics of the Oregon Coastal 
region. The first salmon cannery was established on 
the Rogue River in 1876 by R. D. Hume. This cannery 
packed an average of 3/4 million cans of salmon annually 
between 1880 and 1890. A Coos Bay cannery began packing 
in 1880 and was followed by a Coquille cannery in 1883. 
The salmon fishing started to decline in the 1920 's and 
1930 's due to overfishing and logging techniques which 
employed splash dams to create artificial freshets to 
float logs down the major streams. Smaller streams 
important as spawning grounds were left choked with 
debris. Modern hatchery techniques and increased aware- 
ness in the logging and fishing industry reversed the 
decline of salmon and other anadromous fish until the 
present day levels have been reached. Small headwater 
streams are no longer neglected and their importance 
to a continued fishery has been realized. 

The most abundant aquatic animals in the study area 
are the vertebrates. Secondary in abundance but 
equally important, are the invertebrates. None of 
the aquatic animals found in the EAR area are on the 
official State or Federal list of "Threatened or 
Endangered Species." 

The abundance of aquatic animals is limited by the 
quantity and quality of available habitat. Man's 
impacts and natural environmental conditions are 
variables which affect the quality of the aquatic 
habitat. Animal life in larger streams also varies 
in their distribution and seasonal or annual abun- 
dance. Some factors causing this variation in streams 
are floods, droughts, and wide daily and seasonal 
changes in water temperatures. In contrast the 
small, quiet, spring- fed perennial headwater tri- 
butaries are usually the most stable type of stream 
habitat. Even stream flow and temperature for much 
of the year result in a rich food source. In these 
waters, high numbers of aquatic animals are found. 



63 



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(1) Fish 



Certain species of fish are classified only as "game fish" 
by law (Oregon Game Code, 1973). Other species may be 
classed as "game fish" or "food fish," depending upon the 
method of harvest. Fish in Oregon are generally grouped 
into the following categories: anadromous fish, cold- 
water game fish, warm-water game fish, non-game or rough 
fish, and surf and bay fish. 

Fish found in the study area belong to the anadromous 
fish, cold-water game fish, and non-game or rough fish 
categories . 

(a) Anadromous Fish . There are four basic salmonids found 
in the study area: cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) 
steelhead (Salmo G. gairdneri) , coho salmon (Oncorhynchus 
kisutch) , and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) . 
These fish use the freshwater environment for reproduction 
and early growth. Anadromous fish use almost all 
available stream systems in the study area; physical 
barriers such as falls and logjams block them from some 
streams. Anadromous fish migrations, spawning and 
incubation periods, for Oregon coastal streams are shown 
in Table 3. 

Each species has its own niche in the aquatic environment. 
Each leads a lifestyle different from the others, although 
sharing the same habitat. For example: 

Chinook salmon need deep gravels and fast water. The 
juveniles often go to sea in their first spring, which 
gives them less exposure to summer heat problems. 

The coho salmon uses small feeder streams for spawning 
and young rear in the stream for a year. 

The steelhead trout use deep fast water for spawning 
but some use small tributaries also. They do not die 
after spawning. They rear in fast water at the head 
of stream pools for 1-2 years. 

The cutthroat trout can stay in the stream, or they may 
migrate to the ocean. They do not die after spawning, and 
are the most susceptible to stream degradation. 



64 - 



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These fish spawn in the riffles of the streams; however, 
gravel of the proper size must be present. 

Chinook salmon require gravel that is the size of a 
baseball, while the coho salmon and steelhead trout spawn 
in gravel that ranges from pea to orange in size. 

Cutthroat trout spawn in gravel the size of peas or 
marbles. 

Pools are the rearing area of young fish and resting 
areas for adults. 

As stated above, certain basic needs are necessary for 
the fish to survive and reproduce their kind. The 
successful reproduction of the anadromous species depends 
upon adequate water quality in their environment. Water 
temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, total dissolved solids, 
suspended sediments and volume of flow, all affect the 
survival of the egg, larvae and juvenile stages. 

Another anadromous fish found in the larger streams is 
the Pacific lamprey. Although widespread, this fish is 
not considered to be an important resource nor a signi- 
ficant liability. 

(b) Cold-water Game Fish 

Members of this group are the fish most often sought 
by sport anglers. The members of this group found in the 
study area are the cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) , and 
rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), both may be resident 
fish or be artificially introduced into the stream from 
fish hatcheries. 

The key environmental factors that are necessary for 
continued productivity of cold-water game fish include 
cool water temperatures (40°-70° F.), clean water, 
adequate food, and available spawning areas. 

Physiological adaptation to a relatively narrow range of 
temperatures limits the distribution of this group of 
fish to certain sections of streams. During this period, 



65 



cold-water fish are found at depths where temperatures 
and dissolved oxygen levels are adequate. Some streams 
will be inhabited throughout their length by fish of this 
group; other streams may only be inhabitable in the upper 
and middle sections. Generally, the lower sections of 
the larger rivers are uninhabitable because shading from 
the bank is inadequate. 

Water temperature becomes even more critical during the 
spawning and incubation period. Egg mortality increases 
significantly above 55° F. due to accelerated growth of 
the embryo. Below 40° F., the development of the embryo 
is nearly stopped so incubation is prolonged. Each 
species has evolved spawning behavior to utilize the 
environmental conditions found in most small to mid-sized 
streams. 

Clean water is important to this group because of the 
prolonged egg stage and because of the relationship 
between the fish and their food. All fish of this group 
deposit their eggs in or on the gravel of stream beds . 
The eggs are at the mercy of environmental conditions for 
extended periods before hatching. Turbid water during 
that time frequently causes a layer of fine sediment to 
settle over the eggs, disrupting the free interchange of 
dissolved oxygen and gaseous wastes. Depending on the 
degree of interference with the metabolism of the embryo, 
debilitation or death may result. 

Young trout and salmon are primarily insect feeders. As 
they grow and become larger, a greater variety of organ- 
isms are eaten, including crustaceans and terrestrial 
insects that fall into streams. Mature individuals, 
especially cutthroat, become predaceous on small fish. 
An abundant population of salmonid species is therefore 
dependent upon a healthy food chain consisting of many 
small animals that feed on aquatic plants. Good quality 
water and habitat conditions are essential to maintain 
the food chain. Without clear water, the food chain is 
disrupted at the plant production level, reducing the 
productivity of the system. Turbid water interferes with 
the fishes' ability to see and utilize terrestrial insects 
that fall into the water. On smaller streams, over 30 
percent of the total fish diet may be terrestrial insects 
(Chapman, 1961) . 



- 66 



TABLE 3 ANADROMOUS FISH MIGRATION, SPAWNING AND INCUBATION PERIODS, OREGON COAST STREAMS 



July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June 
Cutthroat trout ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 
Resident sea run * 



Winter steelhead * 



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 



ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 






Coho salmon 



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 



ooooooooooooooooooooooo 



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 



Fall chinook salmon 



oooooooooooooooooooooooo 



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 



oooooooooo - Main period when adults are in streams . 

- Main period when spawning occurs . 

xxxxxxxxxx - Main period when eggs and fry are in gravel. 

* 'u\ .j_les rear one or more years in fresh water prior to seaward 
migration. 



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(c) Non-Game Fish . The most common species of non- 
game fish found in coastal streams, and the EAR area, 
and their habitat are listed below. 

Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) - Common in medium 
to large coastal streams. 

Western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni) - Common in 
small to medium coastal streams. 

Largescale sucker (Catostomus macrocheilus) - Generally 
found in slower parts of coastal streams, i.e. Umpqua 
river . 

Redside shiner (Richardsonius balteatus balteatus) - 
Common in coastal river watersheds . 

Umpqua squawfish (Plychochicilus umpquae) - Common to 
Siuslaw and Umpqua rivers. 

Blackside dace (Rhinicthys o. nubilus) - Lower Columbia 
river and coastal streams. Sometimes called black nosed 
dace. 

Coastrange sculpin (Cottus aleuticus) - Inhabits riffle 
areas of small to large coastal streams. 

Prickly sculpin (Cottus asper) - prefers still water and 
sandy bottom areas of medium to large coastal streams. 

Riffle sculpin (Cottus gulosus) - Found in riffles of 
small to medium coastal streams, from tidewater to 
headwaters . 

Reticulate sculpin (Cottus perplexus) - Coastal streams, 
resides in all types of habitat from riffles to quiet, 
sandy areas. 

Three spined stickleback - Two subspecies (Gasterosteus 
aculeatus microcephalus) - Found in freshwater, lowland 
waterways of western Oregon. 



69 - 



(G.a.aculeatus) - Occurs primarily in marine and brackish 
water, but enters freshwater to spawn above the head of 
tidewater. 

(2) Invertebrates . This group of aquatic animals plays an important 
role in nature's plan. They contribute to the aquatic food chain 
and other complex ecological relationships in aquatic eco- 
systems. Without the invertebrates (animals without back- 
bones) , vertebrate life forms in the aquatic environment could 
not survive. Invertebrates found in the study area include: 

CRUSTACEA - Crayfish and snails 

INSECTA - Mayflies, caddis flies, etc. 

The EAR area encompasses many streams, each harboring its own 
numbers of aquatic animals according to its capacity and 
ability to do so. The State of Oregon has divided all streams 
into two classifications: 

"Class I Streams" means waters which are valuable for domestic 
use, are important for angling or other recreation and/or 
used by significant numbers of fish for spawning, rearing, 
or migration routes. Stream flows may be either perennial or 
intermittent during parts of the year. 

"Class II Streams" means any headwater streams or minor 
drainages that generally have limited or no direct value for 
angling or other recreation. They are used by only a few, if 
any, fish for spawning or rearing. Their principal value lies 
in their influence on water quality or quantity downstream in 
Class I waters. Stream flow may be either perennial or 
intermittent. 

The BLM uses the State classification of streams. The many 
Class I and Class II streams of the EAR study area as a whole 
constitute a valuable natural resource. They serve as rearing 
and spawning grounds for resident and anadromous fish species 
and many provide excellent recreational opportunities. Class 
II streams, as defined by the State of Oregon, are considered 
equally as important as the Class I streams by the BLM where 
such streams harbor fish life. Some of the important streams 
and major fish species listed by physiographic units are shown 
in Table 4. The streams shown are a representative grouping 
of the three study areas. Many streams found in these areas 
are unnamed but have similar characteristics and are con- 
sidered equally important as habitat for aquatic animals. 



70 



Table 4. Game Fish Found in Report Areas 



Stream Name 



Buck Creek 

Lake Creek 

Soup Creek 

North Fork Soup Creek 

Tom Fool Creek 

Sock Creek 

Panther Creek 

Renfro Creek 

Cedar Lake Creek 

Tioga Creek 

Burnt Creek 

Brummet Creek 

Deadhorse Creek 

East Fork Coquille River 

Camas Creek 

Sandy Creek 

Rock Creek 

Jennings Creek 



Lease Application Area 



Coho Chinook Steelhead Cutthroat trout 



Loon Lake 
Loon Lake 
Loon Lake 
Loon Lake 
Loon Lake 
Loon Lake 
Callahan 
Callahan 
Callahan 
Coquille River 
Coquille River 
Coquille River 
Coquille River 
Coquille River 
Coquille River 
Coquille River 
Coquille River 
Coquille River 



X 
X 
X 
X 

X 



X 
X 
X 



X 

X 
X 



X 

X 
X 
X 
X 



X 

X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 



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There are streams within the study areas that are con- 
sidered critical habitat areas. These streams are 
usually, but not always, Class I streams. Buffer strips 
are maintained in most instances along those critical 
streams, and efforts are made to keep siltation and 
debris to a minimum. Critical fish habitat areas are 
illustrated in Appendix VI-C. 



73 - 



b. Terrestrial Animals 

Wildlife in the study area is diverse and widely 
distributed, generally adapted to a closed canopy of 
coniferous timber, interspersed with clearings or 
natural openings. The size of animal populations 
depends upon the condition of their habitat. The 
basic requirements of food, water, cover, and space 
are usually more than adequate for most species 
found in the EAR study area. For some, however, 
such as cougar, marten and spotted owls, man's 
encroachment upon their environment has caused their 
numbers to dwindle as their preferred habitat 
decreases. Common animal families found in the study 
area are listed below. A listing of animals can be 
found in appendix VIII. 

Mammals Deer (Cervidae) , Bears (Ursidae) , 
Coyotes and foxes (Canidae) , Squirrels (Sciuridae) , 
Mice and rats (Cricetidae) , Beavers (Castoridae) , 
Wildcats and Cougar (Felidae) , Rabbits and hares 
(Leporidae), Weasels (Mustilidae) , Bats 
(Vespertilionidae) , and Shrews (Soricidae) . 

Birds Hawks and Eagles (Accipitridae and 
Falconidae) , Vulture (Cathartidae) , Owls 
(Tytonidae and Strigidae) , Jays , Magpies and 
Crows (Corvidae) , Grouse (Tetraonidae) , Ducks, 
Geese (Anatidae) , Woodpeckers (Picidae), 
Wrens (Troglodytidae) , and Finches and Sparrows 
(Fringilildae) . 

Reptiles and Amphibians True toads (Bufonidae) , 
True frogs (Ranidae) , Garter and Gopher snakes 
(Colubridae) , and Lizards (Anguidae) 

Insects COrders). Grasshoppers (Orthoptera) , 
Wasps and hornets (Hymenoptera) , and Ants 
(Hymenoptera) . 

The following species found in the EAR study area 
are listed as rare or endangered species by the State 
of Oregon. 



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White footed vole (Aborimus albipes), Ringtailed 
cat (Bassariscus astutus) , Northern bald eagle 
(Haliaeetus leucocephalus) , and Western pigeon 
hawk (Columbarius bendirei) . 

The range of the white footed vole includes only 
western Oregon and Northeastern California. Indi- 
cations are that it is extremely uncommon over its 
entire range and it has been termed "the rarest 
microtine rodent in North America" (Moser and 
Johnson, 1967:24). Some investigators however, 
indicated that they believed the species ultimately 
will be shown to be more common than is presently 
believed (Bailey, 1936: 200; Moser, 1966: 217a; E. 
F. Hooven) . The animal was collected in an exten- 
sive portion of western Oregon and was taken in 
logged and burned areas dominated by serai vegetation 
as well as in mature coniferous forests. These data 
indicated that requirements of the species are 
compatible with present land-use practices. 

The ringtailed cat was included as being found in 
the EAR area but should generally be considered 
north of its geographical range, because ecological 
conditions are less than optimal for the species. 
Only (12) of these animals have been reported in the 
Ringtail Fur-catch Reports for the 1955-1970 trapping 
seasons in Coos County. They have been protected in 
Oregon since 1970. Populations are probably not 
greatly affected by man's activities. 

The northern bald eagle nests from Alaska and northern 
Quebec south to Oregon and the Great Lakes. In 
Oregon, it tends to nest in timbered edges of mountain 
lakes, major rivers, and the coast. An essential 
part of their habitat is tall snags and snag topped 
trees used for perching sites in the vicinity of 
feeding and nesting areas. Very few known nesting 
sites are found along the coastal strip: Yaquina 
Bay, Tillamook Bay, Depoe Bay, Coos Bay, and the 
Umpqua river area from Winchester Bay to approxi- 
mately 30 miles up river. 



75 



The northern spotted owl is resident from southwestern British 
Columbia south to the San Francisco Bay area, in the Cascades, 
and in the coast ranges. West of the Cascades it is con- 
sidered a permanent resident. Preferring old-growth Douglas- 
fir forests within the EAR area, the bird is not easily 
detected. This undoubtedly accounts in part for its presumed 
endangered status. 

Big Game Animals - Elk, Deer, Bear and Cougar . "The early 
settlers found a bountiful supply of these larger animals in 
southwestern Oregon. As the first trails were blazed into the 
timbered ridges, along river benches, flats and lowlands, they 
were amazed by the abundance of deer, elk, and bear they 
encountered. Cougars, following the great herds of herbivores 
were plentiful. Great slaughters of these animals are now 
history. (Frances Fuller Victor, 1891):" It is estimated that 
not less than one thousand elk were killed in one year in Coos 
County alone, for the skins only." Deer and elk herds suffered 
a tremendous toll, slain for their hides--the carcasses left 
to rot. 

The two ivory teeth of the great Bull elk were taken also. 
Both hide and teeth brought fair prices on the market. 

Since that time populations of these animals fluctuated and 
gradually laws were enacted for their preservation. They 
became game animals with seasons and limits placed on them. 
The deer and elk are now the most highly prized of large game 
animals by most sportsmen. 

Roosevelt Elk ( Cervus canadensis: wapiti) . There are an 
estimated ten elk per square mile found in the EAR area. 
Closed canopy forests that provide escape, shelter, and 
protect them from the elements are a crucial part of their 
habitat. Being browsers and foragers they generally follow 
any natural or man-made openings in the dense overstory 
seeking the nutritious ground vegetation springing forth in 
the wake of fires or logging. "Average daily distances 
travelled is about 1200 yards from October to June, 800 yards 
in July, and 500 yards in August and September." Normally elk 
feed over a more or less circular path, spending a few hours 
to two to three days. (Harper, 1971) The rutting or breeding 
season normally begins in late August and continues until 
mid-November. During the rut, bulls utilize wallows 



76 



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which are often filled with stagnant water and foul smelling mud. 
Studies have shown only 50 percent of the female (cow) Roosevelt 
elk were found to become impregnated annually in western Oregon as 
opposed to 88 percent of the Rocky Mountain wapiti. Harper (1971) 
stated that reproduction in wapiti appears to be dependent upon an 
adequate and nutritionally sound diet which allows a cow to reach 
peak physical condition in the breeding season. Roosevelt elk that 
are lactating (giving milk) , are apparently in such poor physical 
condition that a pattern of breeding only occurs every other 
year in many cows. A cow normally gives birth to a single calf; 
only rarely, two. Most calves are born during the last week of May 
and the first week of June, when the cow leaves the herd and 
selects a birthplace or calving area. After a week or so, the cow 
and her new offspring rejoin the herd. Cows during this period 
are, not unexpectedly, in a nervous state, highly sensitive to 
man's presence. It has been found that elk are unlikely to use 
even favored calving areas if noisy operations such as logging or 
construction is ongoing nearby. 

Habitat considered crucial for elk survival, are shown in 
Appendix VI-C. 

Black-tailed Deer ( Odocoileus Hemionus columbianus) . This 
member of the deer family is found along the entire Oregon 
coast. The black-tailed deer are often found sharing the same 
habitat with elk. Black-tailed deer are not actually forest 
dwellers in the sense that Bailey indicated, instead they are 
primarily inhabitants of the forest's edge where there are open- 
ings, and thickets to give them adequate concealment. They are not 
herd animals like the elk and seldom form large groups. The 
rutting season is in late fall and the birth of fawns is usually in 
May. 

The home range of these deer is familiar ground over which they 
move freely, a series of small areas connected by trails to browse, 
water and rest areas, all having readily accessible escape routes. 
Being primarily browsers (eating woody plants) their principal diet 
consists of trailing blackberry, red huckleberry, salal, grasses, 
and forbs. In the summer and early fall they consume thimbleberry 
also. 

The black-tailed deer adapts readily to incremental changes in 
its environment. Currently this animal is found throughout the 
EAR study area. 



77 



American Black Bear ( Ursus americanus) The black bear is 
one of the largest mammals, and now the largest carnivore, 
found in Oregon. They occur along the entire Oregon coast 
and throughout most of the state and are found in nearly 
all habitat types. Black bear are probably more numerous in 
the Oregon Coast Range than elsewhere in the state. 

Black bears are opportunistic in their feeding. They eat a 
great variety of green vegetation, fruits, and fungi. In 
addition to plant materials, they eat insects, as well as 
other invertebrates, mammals, birds, and carrion. Taylor 
and Shaw (1927) wrote of the black bear in Mount Rainier 
National Park: "He is an expert at pulling over garbage 
cans so as to get at their contents." 

Like the cougar, discussed below, the populations of bears 
are greater where wilderness conditions prevail. 

Cougar ( Felis concolor) The mountain lion or cougar occurs 
in almost all areas not densely populated by man. Once 
considered a detriment to man because of livestock depre- 
dations and hunted by bounty hunters indiscriminantly, the 
cougar was declared a game species in 1967. Available evidence 
indicates they currently occupy most of the suitable areas 
in Oregon and are increasing in numbers. Several sightings 
were reported by foresters traveling through the EAR area 
in the past year. 

The Oregon Department of Fish § Wildlife in their 1974 Ann* al 
Report lists the hunter-versus harvest ratios for the folio 'ng 
game animals : 

Roosevelt elk - 33,200 hunters harvested 3,461 elk in the 
1973 season. Hunting pressure and harvest increased 31 
percent in eastern Oregon and 48 percent in western Oregon 
over 1972. 

Black-tailed deer - 170,600 hunters reported taking 62,130 
deer in the 1973 general deer season in western Oregon. 
Hunter numbers increased 21 percent and the harvest totaled 
41 percent more than in 1972. 

As can be seen by these comparisons, these animals are being 
sought by more and more sportsmen each year. They provide 
revenue to the State from the sale of licenses and tags while 
providing the sports -minded with many thousands of hours 
of recreational value. 



- 78 



Many other smaller mammals, birds, and amphibians are also 
found in the EAR area. These animals found in coastal forests 
depend on the variety of insect life that abounds in the damp, 
mild environment, as well as the great mass of seeds produced 
by evergreen trees . 

Mink, marten, otter, beaver, and muskrat favor this habitat 
due to the proximity of lakes and streams that afford food, 
bank dens, and travel routes. While waterfowl are not normally 
considered as representative birds of timbered habitat, many 
ducks use the lakes, rivers, and estuaries adjacent to the 
moisture-holding forest lands. Some ducks, including the 
golden-eye, bufflehead, and wood duck, nest in tree cavities 
adjacent to water. 



e 

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- 79 



ECOLOGICAL INTERRELATIONSHIPS 



Environment 



All living things, plants, animals, and humans that make up a 
biotic community are surronunded by conditions that affect 
them in their struggle for existence. All organisms share a 
common need for sustenance to continue their life processes 
and reproduction cycles . They must interact each with the 
other to fulfill their individual needs. The changing 
temperatures, light, moisture and those surroundings which a 
plant or animal naturally occupies. Any environment changes 
continually and the life that inhabits it must become adapted 
if it is to survive. 

Plant-Animal Communities 



Plants and animals do not ordinarily live alone; instead 
they live together in communities. Within the study area 
are many such associations, each holding its own particular 
set of plants and animals. 

The coniferous forest of the study area is dominated by 
Douglas-fir trees. They make up an ecosystem that is cool, 
moist and shady where only certain kinds of biota can thrive. 
In the ground live certain decay bacteria and fungi, which 
change dead plant and animal matter into food for plants. In 
the trees and other plants are many kinds of insects that 
serve as food for insect-eating birds of the community. Many 
small mammals native to the area live on the forest floor, 
where they gather and feed on fruits, seeds, and small plan ~. 
There small animals in turn become food for the owls, hawks, 
coyotes, bobcat, and other predators of the community. 

The number or organisms involved in the amount of energy 
passing through the food chain becomes smaller with each 
successive link. The animals at the lower end of the food 
chain are most abundant. Successive links of carnivores 
decrease rapidly in number until there are very few carnivores 
at the top. This concept is known as the pyramid of numbers 
and when drawn out graphically appears in the form of a triangle. 



80 







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Along the forest edge and expanding outward into newly logged 
and older loggings is a series of ecological communities 
succeeding one another in stages of biotic development. At 
their edges, for instance, where forest and cutover lands 
merge, each community blends in with one or more communities. 
These blending-in areas are called "ecotones." Streams of the 
study area blend with several communities as they trace their 
ultimate path to the ocean, forming riparian habitat, a 
classic "ecotone." Life found in the streams interacts in 
much the same manner as described above, dependent upon factors 
which affect all, but somewhat more vulnerable than their 
terrestrial counterparts, for they cannot move from their 
aquatic environment and relocate elsewhere. 

3. Food Chain 

All food chains, directly or indirectly relate back to 
living plants. Plant and animal communities occur together 
in the same habitat and have many interrelations, forming a 
biotic community. The biotic community along with its habitat 
is termed an ecosystem. Food chains follow a general plan; 
however, the first link as stated is always a plant or some 
part of a plant. Collectively, food chains are called "food 
webs". These are very complex in nature. 

4. Competition and Cooperation 

The plants of a community compete with each other for growing 
space, light, soil, minerals, and other necessities. The 
animals compete for food and shelter, and among the same 
species, for mates. For both plants and animals, life is a 
continuous struggle against enemies and unfavorable conditions 
in the environment. Only the fittest survive. Yet despite 
all the struggle and competition, there is a great deal of 
cooperation among living things. Plants help animals by 
providing them with food and shelter, and places to raise 
their young. Animals help plants by spreading their seeds, by 
carrying pollen from one plant to another, and by destroying 
harmful insects and other plant enemies . The forces of 
competition and cooperation tend to keep the varieties and 
populations of plants and animals of a community at roughly 
the same levels year after year, as long as man does not 
interfere with the environment. 



81 



5. Community Structure 

Biotic communities are organized in ways other than food 
chains. Most are arranged in horizontal layers called stra- 
tifications. The coniferous forest of the study area and 
adjacent lands, beginning at the soil, has four layers: 

Subterranean - The soil layer, containing the roots of trees, 
fungi and other plants. Worms, shrews, moles and other 
burrowing animals are also common to this area. 

Forest Floor - Composed of fallen leaves, twigs, debris and 
herbaceous plants, which serve as a home or feeding place for 
a variety of insects, mammals, and ground dwelling species of 
birds. 

The Shrub Layer - Containing small trees, shrubs, large tree 
trunks, and a vast and diversified host of insects, spiders, 
moths, tree frogs, birds, and other animals. 

The Canopy - Here are the leafy crowns of the larger trees, 
bearing the full brunt of the elements and shielding the 
layers below. 

6. Community Rhythms 

Plants and animals of the EAR area show day and night cycles 
of activity. Some animals such as the bat species found in 
the study area are rarely seen by the casual observer. They 
are usually active at night and rest during the day. Some 
animals, such as the deer and elk found here are most ac> ; ve 
during the early morning and late evening hours. In some 
communities there are more animals active during the dayl s\t 
hours. In some communities the reverse is ture. Seasonal 
rhythms are seen in the reproductive cycle of the fish and 
wildlife of the study area. Many species such as elk, deer, 
bear and anadromous fish have specific breeding or spawning 
periods. 

7. Succession 

The process of nature's changing the various plant-animal 
communities is known as succession. Over a period of years 
the environment of these communities undergoes many physical 
changes. As the environment changes, new kinds of plants and 
animals begin to replace the previous occupants, to be in 
turn, replaced by others. This is evidenced in the study 



82 



area by the many stands of old growth timber in staggered 
settings with cut-over lands. In nature, as in man's way of 
timber harvest, the process goes on and on, one community 
giving way to another until a "climax" community is reached. 
The "climax" community is the one best adapted to the en- 
vironment which shaped it and will remain indefinitely. In 
the study area the coniferous forest of shade-tolerant species 
is a climax community. 



F. HUMAN VALUES 




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Landscape Character 

The Douglas- fir forests of the Coast Range present a pictu- 
resque panorama of contrasting color schemes and textures, 
interwoven into a changing landscape where forested uplands 
give way to the pastoral setting of the lower floodplains. 

The EAR area hums with activity during the summer months . The 
shrill sounds of yarder whistles and steady roar of trucks are 
heard. Following the many roads carved into the hillsides a 
patchwork pattern of forested land emerges . Patches of 
oldgrowth timber are found intermingled with recent clearcuts 
and younger stands of timber. The dark greenish blue of the 
older timber canopy contrasts with the lighter hues of greens, 
browns, yellows, and all the other myriad of colors found 
nearby. Many clearcut areas with graceful curving boundaries 
and natural groupings blend harmoniously into the surroundings 
while others with boundaries marked by straight lines belie 
nature's way in their geometric precision. 

Adjacent to the Loon Lake study area is Ash Valley. Situated 
in the large basin above the lake, Ash Valley is a small rural 
community economically dependent upon small dairy operations 
and the woods products industry. A small grade school rem- 
iniscent of yesteryear serves to educate the smaller children. 
The older children are bussed to Reedsport, nine air miles 
distant. Other structures are family domiciles, barns, and 
fences separating pasture lands. Loon Lake situated below the 
valley, harbors along its shores two resorts which provide 
services in the form of boat rentals, camping, groceries, 
taverns and a cafe. The BLM maintains an overnight camping 
facility near the outlet of the lake. Some summer homes are 
situated along the shoreline. Primary access into the Loon 
Lake area is via the Mill Creek County Road from State Highway 
38 east of Reedsport. 



83 



The Coquille River study area is similar to Ash Valley des- 
cribed above in many respects. The small rural communities of 
Dora, Sitkum, and Remote situated near the study area are the 
hubs of the pastoral settings. Buildings, powerlines, fenced 
fields and other structures are viewed against a background of 
the sharply rising uplands. 

Sightseers to the EAR area will find a not altogether un- 
pleasing view even in areas of ongoing development. Big tree 
country will come to mind after sighting those giant firs 
looming out of the forested landscape. Some measure of solitude 
and remoteness is yet to be found in the area. 

Socio-Cultural Interests 

a. Educational - Scientific - Historical 

White men were known to have visited the Coast of Oregon 
as early as 1542. It was not until 1825-1826 however, 
that white men were to explore those lands. The first 
white men in numbers came down the coast from Fort 
Vancouver. These men, seeking fur and gold, were members 
of the Hudson's Bay Company, under the leadership of 
Alexander R. McLeod. With occasional exceptions, such as 
Jedediah Smith, they were the only white men traveling 
these lands for several years after 1826. 

These men established the first outpost near what is 
now known as Elkton on the banks of the Umpqua River. 
Later in 1850, Captain Levi Scott laid out the townsite 
of Scottsburg, downriver at the head of tidewater. Men 
exploring inland from Scottsburg in 1852 discovered Loon 
Lake, and Camp Creek. 

In 1853 the first settlement in Coos County was estab- 
lished in the Coos Bay area. Isolated from the interior, 
construction of a stage road to Roseburg was started in 
1865. The Coos Bay Wagon Road as it later became known, 
crosses through the EAR area following the East Fork of 
the Coquille River. The present day County Road closely 
approximates the original location. 



84 



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Landform determined early settlement patterns. Generally 
favored were river banks and adjacent high ground. 
Communities, streams and mountains named for early settlers 
depict the history of the area. Dora and Sitkum east of 
the study area were once stage stops along the Wagon 
Road to Roseburg. Locations of early day sawmills, lumber 
camps, schools, hotels and settlements are present in or 
nearby the study area. In many cases there are no re- 
maining structures to indicate the sites. 

Other points of interest found in and near the study 
area are parks and timber preserves. Dora County Park 
and the Judge Hamilton County Park (lease Application 
#13506) found in the Coquille River study area are 
revested grant lands designated by Act of Congress as 
public parks and campsites "for recreational purposes and 
to preserve the rare groves of myrtle trees thereon." 
The Maria C. Jackson State Park on Brummet Creek was 
purchased and deeded to the State of Oregon by Save the 
Myrtlewoods, Inc. The Brummet Creek Reservation was 
withdrawn by the Secretary of the Interior, November 8, 
1946 as "timber preservation areas and for the protection 
of their recreational and scenic values." 

b. Archeology 

Anthropological evidence indicates that Oregon and the 
Pacific northwest generally has been inhabited for about 
ten thousand years. Primary habitation occurred wherever 
lake and river shorefronts allowed settlement and provided 
water supply. When the last Ice Age provided a land-bridge 
between Asia and Alaska the first migrations into the 
northern part of this continent occurred, and successive 
waves of migrants moved progressively down the Pacific 
coast. Three culturally distinct but related groups of 
tribes settled in what we presently define as the State 
of Oregon, located in each of the three main regions - 
the plateau, the valley, and the coast. The massive 
distinctions between these three regions (in terms of 
climate and geography) determined to a large degree the 
cultural forms developed by each set of tribes inhabiting 
them. Those living on the plateau assumed a socio-cultural 
lifestyle similar to the semi-nomadic North American plains 



85 - 



Indians (most typically associated in our present day culture 
as representing the stereotype of the Native American) . The 
tribes living in the valley and along the coast were surrounded 
by an environment more in harmony with settled living patterns. 
It was with members of these tribes - already established in 
the area for millenia - that the first white travellers to 
Oregon met and traded in the middle of the sixteenth century. 

The Oregon coast was inhabited historically by an Athobascan 
speaking people, a race of Indians composed of numerous 
families or tribes. They lived simple lives, never travelling 
far. Their villages for the most part, were composed of 
rectangular wooden structures set about the mouths of rivers 
or the shorelines of bays where tidal flats were exposed. 
From the ocean beaches they gathered food; shellfish, crabs, 
fish, gull eggs, whatever the ocean offered was eaten. They 
also hunted deer and elk, and supplemented their diet with 
berries and edible roots in season. They travelled up some 
rivers to harvest salmon and eels. They traveled as far as 
the head of Camas Valley to dig camas and gather myrtle nuts. 

In view of the available evidence it is doubtful if archeo- 
logical sites of this early Indian culture will be found in 
the EAR area. These people were heavily dependent upon the 
coastal lands for sustenance. Game was plentiful along the 
coast in those times and forays deep into the rugged coast 
range were probably not required to take these animals . No 
known sites of archeological value have been discovered in the 
EAR area to date, and archeologists queried indicated that in 
all likelihood, none would be. 

Upon request, the State Historic Preservation Office conducted 
a search of properties listed on the National Registry and 
found that none were located within the lease areas. The 
Sandy Creek covered bridge, on private land, in the Coquille 
River Area is listed on the statewide inventory. Also, from 
their inquiries, they anticipate a low density of archeolo- 
gical sites within the lease area, but recommend that surveys 
be conducted prior to ground disturbing activities. 

Social Welfare 

a. Population 

The past three decades has seen the population of the Oregon 
Coastal area increase steadily, having more than doubled from 
170,338 in 1940 to 353,680 in 1970. During this same period 
the growth rate of the Oregon coastal area of 2.46 percent per 
year was slightly faster than that of the State, which was 2.2 
percent. Only during the last decade have the Oregon coastal 
areas failed to increase their share of Oregon's population. 



86 - 







Population growth in the Reedsport and Coos Bay areas of 
the South Coast Subarea resulted from early development 
of the timber resource. Water transportation on the 
rivers and through navigable harbors facilitated movement 
of the resource and gave access to coastal, intercoastal, 
and world markets. In recent years the timber resource 
has become more intensively utilized as the industry has 
become vertically integrated. Products are shipped into 
world markets and the industry has continued to expand. 
Population in the Reedsport area and in Coos County has 
increased over many years. Industries serving the forest 
products complex have also expanded. More recently the 
South Coast Subarea has become important as a tourist, 
recreation, and retirement area. All coastal subareas 
have, at various times experienced both rapidly increasing 
populations and stagnant or declining populations due to 
changes in economic opportunities. 

The major communities of Coos County and their 1972 
populations are Coos Bay (13,320), North Bend (8,685), 
Coquille (4,300), Myrtle Point (2,595), Bandon (1,895), 
Eastside (1,490), and Powers (835). 

The major population centers of western Douglas County 
are Reedsport (4,039), the Tenmile area (2,559), Gardiner, 
and Scottsburg. The population data for Coos County is 
summarized below: 

Population of Coos County 



Year 



1900 
1910 
1920 
1930 
1940 
1950 
1960 
1970 



Population 



10,324 
17,959 
22,257 
28,373 
32,466 
42,265 
54,955 
56,515 



Change (%) 



72 
24 
28 
14 
30 
30 
3 



87 







Employment 

Manufacturing is highly important to this coastal area; 
it is a critical part of the economic base, a highly 
specialized manufacturing economy, very dependent on 
forest resources. The principal industries are lumbering, 
shipping, fishing, agriculture, and recreation/tourism. 
Charleston, and Winchester Bay are two of many coastal 
resort towns which possess fine harbors catering to 
commercial fishermen, charter fleets, and sports craft. 
Coos County's sawmills produce twenty billion board 
feet of timber annually and dominate the economy of 
the region. Fifty-eight percent of Coos County's 
working force are employed by the lumber industry. 
The area provides hotel services, schools, utilities, 
food and retail services which compare favorably with 
other Oregon coastal areas. Table 5 shows employment 
data for specified coastal subareas with indices of 
specialization. 

Income 

Per capita personal income for Oregon is slightly higher 
than the United States average - $3,163 vs. $3,139 
(1969 data). The difference is less than one percent. 
Per capita income of the Oregon coastal area, when 
compared to the state norm, has an Oregon relative of 
.89. This data with other relative data and comparisons 
of mean family income is shown in Table 6. 



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1 


Clatsop 


Tillamook. 


Lincoln 


West. 


Lane 






Coos 


? '- '■■[■ - ; 
Curry (Int. Douglas 


_ 


County 


County 


County 


Cou 


nty 


Reeds 
Empl. 


port 
I/S 


County 
Empl. I/S 


County 


County 


industry 


Empl. 


I/S 


Empl. I/S 


Empl. 


I/S 


Empl. 


ih 


Empl, 


I/S 


Empl. I/S 


Agriculture, forestry, & fisheries 


557 


1.4 


762 3.3 


563 


1.7 


190 


1,6 


85 


1.1 


927 1.3 


479 


2.9 


1256 1.6 j 


Mining 


7 


,1 


16 ' .4 


50 


.8 








22 


1.3 


17 .1 


— 


— 


195 2.5 ; 


Contract construction 


718 


1.1 


366 1.0 


534 


i.o- 


216 


1.2 


183 


1.3 


933 .8 


175 


.6 


1169 .8 l 


' Manufacturing 


2651 


1,0 


1749 1.1 


1983 


3.7 


... 
1335 


1.6 


960 


1.6 


6915 1.3 


1621 


1.4 


7124- 1.3 


Food J, kindred products 


1021 


5.4 


143 1.3 


208 


1.3 


37 


.7 


115 


2.8 


304 .8 


97 


1.2 


108 .3 


Textile & apparel products 


35 


— 


— , 


13 


— 


5 


— 





— 


12 


5 








Lumber, wood prod,, furniture 


848 


6.2 


1404 7.8 


836 


7.2 


1178 


28.4 


581 


19.8 


5483 21.2 


1420 


24.6 


5740 20.1 


Printing & publishing 


114 


— 


33 


75 


— 


26 


— 


21 


— 


150 


25 





14 9 


! Chemicals & allied products 


36 


— 








— 


■ 








- 


186 





_ _ 


5 


Electric 4 other machinery 


53 


— 


41 


43 


— 











._ 


87 


4 


__ 


4 


Transportation equipment 


69. 


-- 


5 , — 


20 


— 








. 6 





85 





_ _ 


121 


Other (■ misc. manufacturing 


475 


.5 


123 .2 


788 


1.0 


89 


.3 


237 


1.6 


608 .3 


70 


.2 


997 .5 


Railroads & rail-express 


17 


.2 


25 .5 


4 


.1 


24 


1.3 


20 


1.3 


72 .5 







95 1.3 


Trucking & warehousing 


87 


.6 


46 .5 


132 


1.1 


' 50 


. 1.4 


16 


.7 


447 1.6 


11 


.5 


280 .7 


Other transportation 


342 


2.4 


37 ,4 


117 


.9 


46 


.7 


34 


1.4 


612 2.2 


41 


.6 


164 .7 


Communications 


129 . 


.9 


46 .5 


95 


.8 


15 


.7 


20 


.7 


241 .9 


9 


.1 


264 .7 


Utilities & sanitary service 


104 


.6 


127 1.2 


170 


1.1 


45 


.6 


23 


.6 


282 .8 


46 


.6 


230 .6 


Wholesale trade 


217 


.5 


116 .5 


14 5 


.4 


36 


.2 


23 


.2 


871 1.0 


95 


.8 


517 ' .5 


Food & dairy product stores 


237 


.9 


132 .8 


287 


1.3 


78' 


.8 


79 


1.2 


525 1.0 


130 


1.2 


586 1.2 


Eating & drinking places 


611 


1.9 


311 -1.7 


763 


2.8 


67 


.7 


80 


1.3 


606 1.0 


181 


1.4 


715 1.0 


Other retail trade 


922 


.8 


557 ' .8 


887 


.9 


307 


1.0 


199 


.9 


1944 .9 


466 


1.0 


2158 1.0 


Finance, insurance, real estate 


313 


.6 


147 .5 


349 


.8 


82 


.6 


48 


.4 


592 .6 


132 


.6 


716 .6 


Hotels & other personal services 


490 


1.5 


259 1 . 4 


84 3 


3.0 


120 


1.3 


67 


1.0 


427 .7 


160 


1.2 


716 1.0 


Private households 


121 


.8 V 


75 .8 


111 


.8 


44 


.7 


21 


.7 


180 .6 


i 18 


.3 


259 ■ .7 


. Business 4 repair services 


202 " 


' .6 


139 .7 


173 


.6 


60 


,6 


41 


.6 


419 " .7 [ 


87 


.6 


479 1.0 


Entertainment, recreation services 


103 


1.3 


46 .9 


155 


2.1 


27 


1.2 


4 


— 


156 1.0 


25 


.8 


93 1.2 


Medical, other prof, services 


2246 ' 


1.2 


985 .9 


1232 


.8 


380 


.7 


279 


.7 


3058 ' .9 


577 


.7 


3776 1.0 


Public administration 


440 


.8 


289 .8 


437 


.9 


72 


.4 


55 


.4 


665 .9 


168 


.7 


933 .'7 


TOTAL 


10,514 


6,230 


9,030 


3,194 


2,259 


19,889 


4,441. 


21,825 


Unemployment 


823 




..0 


820 


319 


228' 


1,503 


498 


2,117 



I/S: Index of Specialization SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census of Population 



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Table 6 Income Data - United States , Oregon, Coastal Area, 
and Subareas, 1969 









Oregon 






Total 


Per 


relative 


Family 




personal 


capita 


per capita 


mean 




income 


income 


income 


income 


United States 


$637,882,468 


$3,139 




$9,590 


Oregon 


6,615,098 


3,163 


1.0 


10,695 


Oregon Coastal Area 


997,818 


2,822 


.89 % 


n . a . */ 


Clatsop County 


89,690 


3,150 


.996 


10,335 


Tillamook County 


50,975 


2,843 


.90 


9,401 


Lincoln County 


74,612 


2,897 


.92 


9,031 


Western Lane County 


26,105 


2,626 


.83 


9,577 


Reedsport 


16,551 


2,686 


.85 


9,981 


Coos County 


169,488 


2,999 


.95 


10,157 


Curry County 


39,304 


3,022 


.96 


9,774 


Interior Douglas County 


165,199 


2,519 


.80 


9,421 


Jackson County 


272,633 


2,884 


.91 


9,624 


Josephine County 


93,261 


2,609 


.82 


8,484 


a/ 

— n.a. - not available. 










SOURCE: U. S. Department 


of Commerce, 


Census of Population 





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PART III 

ANALYSIS OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 

A. PREFACE 

The following section describes the anticipated environmental 
impacts of oil and gas field operations on the surface resources 
within the EAR area, and recommends specific measures to lessen or 
preclude such impacts. If the leases are issued, a subsequent more 
site-specific environmental assessment will be a prerequisite to 
all surface exploration and/or development. 

To make the analysis for this EAR certain procedures are followed, 
and certain constraints and conditions are assumed. 

1. Procedures 

Discrete operations of each phase (stage of implementation) of 
oil and gas leasing are listed in Appendix IX. All discrete 
operations have been considered in the analysis; however, the 
written analysis includes only those operations that were 
considered to have potential for significant impact. 

2. Assumptions 

It is assumed that all of the lessee's operations will be in 
conformance with applicable federal and state laws, regula- 
tions and standard lease stipulations. Such controls are 
detailed in Part I of this EAR. 

Based on information received from the applicant, levels of 
exploration and development are assumed: 

a. The level of exploration is assumed to be one or two 
wells within the lease area. This is considered to be an 
extremely high level of exploration, because the appli- 
cant speaks of one or two exploratory wells in Western 
Oregon. 

b. A moderate oil and/or gas discovery is the maximum, 
reasonable level of development; any production will be 
transported to existing refineries for oil processing and 
distribution, and to existing supply pipelines for gas. 

A moderate oil discovery may result in one well per 40 or 
80 acres within given lease or all leases. A moderate 
natural gas discovery could result in one well per 160 
acres. 

c. Road construction associated solely with oil and gas 
exploration will be minimal. The existing forest road 

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system is highly developed in the Loon Lake and Coquille 
River areas. These roads are designed for log hauling, 
and are adequate for handling the loads associated with 
exploration equipment. The road system on federal land in 
the Callahan Area is virtually undeveloped. It is 
assumed that if exploration is done in this area, that 
road development will be necessary. 

3. Contingencies 

In addition to these assumptions, the following analysis must 
also consider the possible type of impacts associated with the 
unpredictable- -accidents and errors in judgment eg., oil 
spills, fires and well blowouts. Since they are unpredictable 
happenings, the size or degree of the impact is debatable. A 
review of recent exploration and development history may help 
bring some perspectives to such a debate. 

In fiscal year 1975 (July 1, 1974 - June 30, 1975), according 
to the U. S. Geological Survey, there were 10 fires and 10 
blowouts occurring on federal leases. There were 10,092 
federal leases during the fiscal year 1975. 

Table A in Appendix X shows a breakdown by occurrence and 
location of well fires and blowouts during fiscal year 1975. 

Table B in Appendix X is a compilation of crude oil spills 
reported to the Environmental Protection Agency in five 
western states during 1972. The figures represent only oil 
spills attributed to field operations and do not include the 
transportation or the refining of crude oil. Of the total 
spills, 40 percent resulted from flowline corrosion or 
freezing. The remaining spills were caused by human error, 
mechanical failure, natural causes, poor maintenance, or in a 
few cases, vandalism. The statistics relate to spills on all 
ownerships- -private and State lands as well as Federal. 

ANTICIPATED ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS 

Road and site construction is an important operation that could 
have significant impact on the components of the environment. New 
road construction and drilling site construction are a possibility 
in preliminary investigations, explorations, and development. Since 
the impacts of road and site contruction are similar, and these 
items could possibly occur in several of the stages of implemen- 
tation they will be analyzed as separate entities to eliminate 
repetition. 



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Road and Drilling Site Construction 

Road and drilling site construction in the coastal watersheds 
could have a major adverse impact on most components of the 
environment. Deep cuts are necessary, excess earth from 
excavation sometimes must be sidecast on the downhill side 
and the road surface itself becomes compacted. Road construc- 
tion may precipitate mass soil movements (landslides), and 
open more land to erosion by clearing. Approximately 12 
acres per mile of clearing is necessary in the steep terrain 
that comprises much of the EAR area. Debris from road 
clearing and construction can clog stream channels and over- 
load stream headwall areas with excess material from exca- 
vations. It is anticipated that the only new road construc- 
tion that could be necessary for oil and gas operations, in 
most instances, will be short spur roads. This is because 
of the good existing road network in the study area. (See 
Appendix VI-B) . 

The impacts on air quality from road construction should be 
minimal. Exhausts from road building machinery and dust 
would be minimal (probably one or two machines) and would 
be of short duration, because of short lengths of road 
needed. Road construction impacts on the land (soil) would 
depend on the location. Soil structures are altered during 
road building and the potential of starting landslides and 
accelerated erosion can virtually eliminate the vegetative 
production capability of a large area. This is particularly 
true on sites that are fragile. (See Appendix VI-A) 

Landslides that could be triggered by road construction can 
completely scour the aquatic plants and animals from stream 
channels, and cause sediment to be deposited downstream in 
critical aquatic animal production areas. (See Appendix VI-C) 
The less obvious, but none the less severe, pollution from 
erosion of road surfaces, cutbanks and outboard banks con- 
tinually degrades water quality in the watersheds and reduces 
stream productivity. 

Aquatic plants could be highly impacted by any mass earth 
movements precipitated by road construction. 

The damage to aquatic plants could be severe where it is 
necessary to cross streams with a road. 

Aquatic animals could be impacted by any sediments deposited 
as a result of road construction. The degree of impact 
would depend on the duration and intensity of sedimentation. 



95 



Road construction may displace some terrestrial animals and 
destroy a portion of their habitat; however, the small amount of 
construction anticipated could make this a minor impact. Road 
construction and use in critical elk habitat areas (See Appen- 
dix VI-C), particularly during the breeding and calving seasons, 
could have a major impact on these animals through harassment. 

A permanent road provides access for humans. This presents a 
potential for a high adverse impact on terrestrial animals from 
harassment to possible destruction of the animals. 

A high adverse impact to terrestrial plants (vegetation) is 
expected. Excavation exposes subsoil which is very adverse to 
reestablishment of plants, and the compacted nature of the roadbed 
itself, whether surfaced or unsurfaced, could be devoid of vege- 
tation for a very long time. 

Ecological interrelationships could be adversely impacted by roads. 
The exposed subsoil material and the compacted roadbed resist 
plant succession and the return of a balanced ecosystem within the 
road area. 

Impacts of road building on landscape character (aesthetics) 
are expected to be low. Although many people consider road cuts 
or "scars" to be displeasing, it is anticipated that the amount 
of roads that would be built for oil and gas operations may go 
unnoticed, because of the vast existing network of logging roads 
in all areas except the Callahan area. The Callahan area, however, 
is well off the beaten path for highway travelers and general 
sightseers . 

Road construction could destroy archeological sites if built 
through them. 

Roads constructed in the preliminary investigation phase could be 
low standard temporary roads. Temporary roads can produce sedi- 
ment, trigger landslides, and have the same impacts on the environ- 
ment as higher standard roads. These low standard roads, however, 
could be built in locations that require less excavation and clearing 
than higher standard roads. Impacts of low standard roads could 
be of a lesser magnitude than roads of higher standard. The temporary 
roads can be revegetated after a short period of use. 

Any road construction, temporary or permanent, in fragile 
areas (See Appendix VI-A), regardless of location or pre- 
cautions taken, has a high potential for initiating landslides 



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and excessive erosion that could create an extremely high 
adverse impact on the environment. In addition to producing 
sediment in streams, roads built through these fragile areas 
have a potential through erosion and landslides to reduce 
the shallow soil mantle on these sites to a point where 
any vegetative rehabilitation is almost impossible. 

The construction or enlargement of existing landings for 
drill rig sites could have the same impacts as road construc- 
tion, because of the excavation involved. 

It is a possibility that if some roads are constructed, they 
could be on locations that would become a part of the logging 
road system. 

Preliminary Investigations 

It is assumed that aerial investigations and/or truck mounted 
thumpers are the two types of investigative methods that 
will be used. Low flying aircraft or truck mounted thumpers 
operating adjacent to wildlife nesting, wintering or breeding 
areas could have an adverse impact on the wildlife. All 
wildlife areas for the above purposes, of course, are not 
identified, as these areas are widespread throughout the 
forest. In the case of elk, however, many of the critical 
habitat areas are identified (See Appendix VI-C) , and harass- 
ment could occur by equipment operating in or adjacent to 
these areas . 

Exploratory Drilling 

Land use conflicts could occur between well drilling operations 
and logging operations if both were operating in the same 
immediate area, or utilizing the same road systems. In light 
of the minor amount of exploratory drilling anticipated, it 
is not likely that these conflicts will be serious. 

Water used for drilling and mixing could have a significant 

impact on aquatic animals and plants, if this water is used 

from nearby streams and ponds during the dry seasons. It 

is possible that such use could dry up the streams and possibly 

destroy the aquatic plant and animal life inhabiting the 

stream. 

The possibility of the mud pits used for drilling purposes 
breaking by some unforeseen accident or vandalism or over- 
flowing because of excessive heavy rains, although remote, 



97 



still exists. If these pits were to overflow or break, streams 
could be polluted with the bentonite clay and possibly some 
chemical additives of the slurry. This material going into 
streams could be detrimental to water quality, aquatic plants 
and animals. Mud pit overflowing or failure could cause 
pollution of the soil, water and surrounding vegetation. The 
pollution of adjacent water and vegetation could be toxic to 
terrestrial wildlife drinking the water or eating the vege- 
tation. Pollution from mud pits could be of short duration. 
The mud pit itself could possibly be an entrapment for animals, ,_ 

although the 24 hour operations of the drilling rig 
may deter animals from visiting the site. j™ 



Locating a well site within a critical wildlife area (ter- 
restrial) could harass the animals to the point that they may 
not return to the area. The clearing of vegetation could also 
degrade the quality of a critical habitat area. Location of a 
well site in close proximity to critical aquatic habitats 
increases the possibility of pollutants entering the water 
because of the short distance to the water. 

Noise from machinery could possibly harass elk, particularly 
if the machinery were located in or adjacent to a critical elk 
habitat area. 

The possibility exists of salt water being brought to the 
surface. If not contained, the salt water could pollute 
streams and soil. Excessive salt water pollution could kill 
aquatic life in freshwater streams, and could kill some types 
of terrestrial vegetation. The extent of salt water pollution 
depends on the amount of salt water produced and the duration 
of its production. 



Many safety precautions are employed against well blowouts and 
spills from storage tanks; however, they may occur, resulting 
in oil spills. Oil spills could pollute water courses, 
adversely affecting aquatic life, and could contaminate the 
soil, which may result in the reduction of soil productivity 
and vegetation. 



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There is a potential for hot water to be brought to the 

surface. Depending on the temperature, amount and duration o^ 

the hot water, this could raise stream temperatures if allowed 

to enter streams before cooling and could possibly kill some ■» 

terrestrial vegetation. It is assumed that the hot water will 

be saline in character; if so, the impacts of temperature 

would be added to the impacts of salt. 



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Flaring (burning of gas from wells), if done during the dry- 
summer months, may result in wildfires in the adjacent 
forest. These fires destroy vegetation, wildlife, and reduce 
soil productivity. Loss of vegetation due to fire could 
increase water temperature in streams and leave the land 
vulnerable to accelerated erosion. 

Visual impacts of drilling rigs vary as people vary. Some 
people may object to an off color drill rig in the forest; 
however, these rigs are probably no more unsightly than 
the logging yarders that are present throughout the year 
in the area. It is safe to assume that logging yarders will 
far outnumber the drill rigs. 

4. Development 

The impacts of drilling and associated operations of develop- 
ment are basically the same as those described in the explora- 
tion phase in Section 3.B.3. Development of an oil field will 
require additional wells. A moderate development could result 
in a well every 80 or 120 acres on one lease, all leases, or 
a combination of leases. The extent of oil field development 
is not known at this time. The impacts of developing the 
roads and drill sites remain the same as the roads and drill 
sites in exploratory drilling, however, as the number of sites 
and roads increases the magnitude of the impacts could 
increase. More storage tanks and space for them would be 
needed for development, thus increasing the impacts of possible 
erosion and landslide. The increased number of storage tanks 
could increase the chance of oil spills. 

Gas field development requires less total area than an oil 
field. In the event of a gas field discovery and subse- 
quent development, it is possible to have gas wells spaced 
every 160 acres as compared to the 40-120 acre spacing of an 
oil field. Gas fields do not require storage tanks, therefore 
the impacts of erosion and landslides should be of lesser 
magnitude than those of an oil field, simply because less space 
is needed. 

5. Production 

Production oil and gas fields require some type of trans- 
portation from the site. In producing oil fields, the oil 
could be stored on the site and transported by truck or 



99 



pipeline to a shipping point. Transportation from gas fields 
could be by pipeline to the nearest main pipelines which are 
located east of the study areas in the Willamette and Umpqua 
valleys. 

In producing fields, there is no drilling, road construction, 
site construction and storage facilities (oil fields) . These 
items have been constructed during the development stage. 

Production fields, however, would need transmission pipelines, 
particularly for gas production. Pipeline rights-of-way, for oil 
or gas could require about 10 feet in width. Pipeline right- 
of-ways differ from road right-of-ways basically in location. 
A road must stay on a usable grade, while a pipeline could run 
straight up or down a hill. Any excavation of cleared land on 
an up and down line could initiate serious erosion problems. 
Ground access for equipment to install the pipelines may be necessary. 
Roads, probably temporary could cause impacts as described in 
Section 3.B.I. on road construction. The erosion of pipeline 
rights-of-way could increase sediments in streams as described 
in Section 3.B.1, road construction, but the impact of pipeline 
rights-of-way on ecological interrelationships could be less than 
those of road construction. 

Pipelines above ground may be subject to damage by adjacent timber 
if windthrown or cut in a timber sale. Buried pipelines can 
possibly leak also, but the impacts should be slight, such as 
the killing of some vegetation immediately above the leak. 

The possibility exists for leaks to occur in any pipeline instaPa- 
tion. Leaks from oil pipelines could have the same potential 
for water and soil pollution as oil spills from well drilling, 
depending on the intensity and duration of the leak and the 
position, such as a stream crossing or ridgetop. 

Pipeline rights-of-way would not require the excavation that is 
necessary for road construction. However, the pipelines are 
buried about 2 to 3 feet deep, and this excavation could cause 
erosion and trigger landslides. This is particularly possible 
on fragile sites, although the impacts would probably be of 
lesser extent than that of roads because of the comparatively 
smaller amount of excavation. 



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Subsidence of the ground surface above an oil and gas reservoir 
could result from the withdrawal of large volumes of fluids 
from shallow, poorly consolidated formations charged at 
greater than hydrostatic pressures. Such subsidence could 
reach a maximum rate during the production phase. 

Fire is a possibility, although probably remote, from leaks in 
a gas pipeline. A fire at a leak could possibly result in 
a wildfire situation. The impacts of wildfire are described 
in Section 3.B.3., Exploratory Drilling. 

6. Abandonment 

When wells are abandoned, they are plugged. Regulations 
require that when an exploratory well or an entire production 
lease is abandoned, that the wells will be properly plugged, 
and the sites and road be restored as nearly as possible to 
the original condition. The restoration of roads and drill 
sites could have a favorable impact on components of the 
environment. Returning the areas to vegetation should reduce 
erosion potential and accelerate the return of vegetation 
and a balanced ecosystem to the disturbed areas. 

7. Land Use - Employment 

The land use in the EAR area is almost 100% timber production. 
Alterations of land use patterns of surrounding communities 
should be very remote. Exploratory drilling crews are self- 
contained, as they are very mobile and move with the rig. These 
crews consist of about 30-35 workers (based on 24 hour operation), 
and their stay in an area is only temporary. In the case 
of a discovery, the number of workers may increase, but again 
they should only be temporary. There may be some hiring of 
local workers, but this would probably be a small number. 

If extensive development and production do materialize, 
this is not expected to alter the local land use pattern. 
One employee can maintain 10 to 20 producing gas wells or 
25 oil tanks. No "boom town" aspect is anticipated. In 
view of the above, it is not anticipated that more land 
will be needed for urban-suburban use as a result of oil or 
gas production. 



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Local employment opportunities should be minimal in the 
oil and gas fields, because this is a highly specialized 
trade and much of the local working force is oriented to 
the wood products and supporting industries. There may, 
however be some opportunities for local suppliers and machine 
owners and operators to contract for items such as road and 
site construction and supplies for the crews. 

ANTICIPATED ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF ALTERNATIVE 

The alternative to the proposed action is no action, i.e., not 
issuing any of the leases. If the leases were not granted, 
there would be no impacts from oil and gas leasing. 

POSSIBLE MITIGATING AND ENHANCING MEASURES 

1. Road and Drilling Site Construction 

Road and drilling site construction can possibly occur in 
the preliminary investigation, exploration and development 
phases of oil and gas operations. Possible measures that 
could be used to reduce the impacts of landslide and erosion 
that could be initiated by road and drilling site construction 
will be treated as a separate entity. Methods used to 
reduce the possibility of landslides and erosion could mitigate 
the impacts on air quality, soil productivity, water quality, 
aquatic plants and animals, terrestrial plants and animals, 
ecological interrelationships, landscape character and cultural 
resources . 

The following measures are possible for the mitigation of 
impacts from road and drill site construction: 

a. Existing roads, logging landings, quarry sites and 
stockpile sites could be used whenever possible. 

b. Construction could be permitted only during periods 
of dry weather. 

c. Roads and drilling sites could be constructed to 
minimum standards needed for movement of the necessary 
equipment . 

d. Cut and fill slopes of all new roads and drilling 
sites could be revegetated as soon as possible after 
construction. 



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e. The following measures to mitigate the impacts of road 
and drilling site locations could be used: 

(1) Locate roads out of steep stream headwalls, toes 
of slumps, midslopes and stream bottoms. 

(2) Locate all roads, if possible, in places that could 
later be used by the forest management program. 

(3) Locate drilling sites in places other than sidehills. 

f. Slant drilling or other techniques could be used in lieu 
of constructing new roads and drilling sites on fragile 
sites. The opening of abandoned roads on fragile sites 
could be prohibited. The use of existing, maintained 
roads that lead directly to possible existing drill sites 
could possibly be used in the fragile areas. Fragile 
sites are found on lease application numbers: 9757, 

9759, 9760 and 13422 in the Loon Lake Area; 13388 in the 
Callahan Area and 13406, 13407, 13408, 13409, 13410, 
13411, 13413, 13414, 13415, 13416, 13391, 13392, 13393 in 
the Coquille River Area. (See Appendix VI-A) . 

g. Slant drilling or other techniques could be used in lieu 
of occupying the County Park, located in lease applica- 
tion number 13406, as located on the map in appendix VI-A. 
The County Park comprises about 80 acres and is also 
classed as a fragile site. No occupancy could insure the 
recreational values of this park, which is to protect 
myrtlewood trees' in their natural environment. 

h. Techniques such as slant drilling could be used instead 
of constructing new roads or drilling sites in critical 
wildlife habitat areas (elk and fish). See section D.3.d. 
for additional mitigating measures concerning these 
critical habitat areas. 

Critical wildlife areas for elk and fish are located 
in lease application numbers, 9756, 9757, 9758, 9759, 

9760, 13422 in the Loon Lake Area; 13308, 13309, 13391, 
13393, 13406, 13410, 13411, 13412, 13413, 13414, 13415, 
13416 in the Coquille River Area. (See Appendix VI-C). 

i. Excess material resulting from road and/or drilling site 

construction could be end hauled to prevent sidecasting 

large amounts of unstable overburden that could be subject 
to accelerated erosion. 



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j. Install waterbars in temporary roads, and surface 

these roads with gravel if used during wet weather. At 
end of use, roadway could be blocked, ripped and revege- 
tated. Temporary drilling sites can be treated the same as 
temporary roads. 

k. Permanent roads and well sites used in the productive 
stage could be surfaced with gravel, permanent drainage 
installed and the roads and sites regularly maintained 
to insure proper drainage. 

1. TemporajLy crossing of streams with roads (fords) could 

be permitted only where the stream bottom is rocky enough 
to preclude the dispersion of sediment. Permanent stream 
crossing could be permitted only where permanent culverts 
or bridges designed to carry peak flows are installed. 
Stream channel changes, and/or removal of stream gravel 
could be excluded from the operations. 

m. Topsoil removed by road and drilling site construction could 
be stockpiled and redistributed when temporary roads and 
drilling sites are rehabilitated. Topsoil could be stock- 
piled on nearby abandoned logging roads or landings, or 
could be used to rehabilitate these abandoned areas in lieu 
of rehabilitating the area constructed for oil and gas 
operations . 

n. The services of a professional archeologist, who is know- 
ledgeable about cultural resources could be obtained to 
determine if oil and gas operations will adversely affect 
or destroy any cultural resources. This could be done 
before a drilling permit is issued. 

Preliminary Investigations 

Aerial and truck mounted thumper activity could be excluded 
from proximity to critical elk habitat areas during the calving 
period (May through July) . Critical elk habitat areas are located 
in lease application numbers 9757, 9759, 9760 in the Loon Lake 
Area; 13309, 13406, 13410, 13411, 13412, 13413, 13414, 13415, 
13416 in the Coquille River Area. 



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3. Exploratory Drilling 



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I Hot water produced from wells could also be reinjected 

or contained to prevent the hot water from entering 
streams and raising the water temperature to levels 
that are detrimental to aquatic life. 

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Contingency plans could be developed in case of accidents 
such as well blowouts and fires. Oil and gas field 
employees could be trained for these types of accidents, 
and blowout prevention equipment could be used. Reducing 
the probability of accidents to a minimum will lessen 
the impacts caused by air, soil and water pollution, 
erosion, and the destruction of terrestrial vegetation 
and aquatic life. 

Water withdrawal from streams for drilling operations 
could be controlled so as not to reduce the flow below 
minimum levels needed for aquatic plant and animal 
production as established by the Oregon Department of 
Fish and Wildlife. 

Mud pits could be lined with impervious material and 
protective dikes constructed to prevent seepage, over- 
flowing from excessive rainfall and breaching. This will 
reduce the impacts on soils, aquatic plants and animals, 
water quality, terrestrial plants and animals. Mud pits 
could be fenced to prevent the entrapment of animals. 

The mud pits could be drained and rehabilitated as soon 
as possible after drilling is completed. The mud could 
be disposed of at sites removed from the lease areas; 
this measure will reduce the impacts on the above 
mentioned components, by returning the area to production, 
and eliminating the possibility of the pit's eroding 
through lack of maintenance. 

Slant drilling for exploratory drilling could be used 
instead of occupying critical habitat areas for elk 
and fish. This could reduce the impacts of harassment, 
access and habitat degradation. Lease application 
numbers on which these critical areas are located are 
listed in section D.l.h. Approximate locations are shown 
on the maps in Appendix VI -C. 

Salt water produced from wells could be reinjected or 
contained to prevent contamination of surface waters, 
soils, the possible destruction of fresh water aquatic 
life, and possible destruction of some terrestrial 
vegetation. (See NTL-2B, Appendix II-F). 



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f . Slant drilling or other techniques could be required to 
protect streams and their buffer strips. These streams 
referred to are not the ones referred to in sections 
3.D.l.h. and 3.D.3.d. 



g. Flaring (burning) of gas from wells could be done in 

accordance with State fire laws. All precautions could 
be taken to prevent the possibility of wildfire, which is 
detrimental to vegetation, water quality, soil produc- 
tivity and wildlife. 

h. Sewage disposal systems could be designed specifically 

for the soil and ground water conditions at the site, and 
if not suitable, then self-contained chemical facilities 
could be required. 

i. Streams adjacent to drilling operations could be moni- 
tored for evidence of petroleum-related pollutants. 

j . Electrical generators and power sources could be used if 
a well site is located immediately adjacent to an iden- 
tified critical wildlife (terrestrial) habitat area. 
This can reduce noise that could cause undue harassment 
to wildlife during calving or nesting periods. 

k. Protective dikes could be constructed around storage 
tanks and other facilities for the containment of oil 
spills. The containment of spills can minimize the 
impacts to water quality, soil productivity, aquatic life 
and vegetation. 

4. Development 

Although the development of oil and gas fields require more 
wells, roads and storage facilities (oil fields only) than 
exploratory drilling (Section 3.D.3.), the measures described 
for mitigating the impacts of exploratory drilling are basi- 
cally the same. The increased number of facilities needed 
will require additional personnel to administer the develop- 
ment, especially if more than one field is being developed 
simultaneously. 

5. Production 

Measures to reduce impacts in the production phase are con- 
cerned mainly with transportation of oil or gas from the site, 
and accident prevention such as pipeline leaks or breaks, and 
geological hazards of removing oil or gas from geologic for- 
mations. Measures that are possible to mitigate spills from 
oil storage facilities are the same as those in Section 3.D.3., 
exploratory drilling. 

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a. Pipelines could follow existing roads, where possible, by 
burying in ditchlines or adjacent to fill toe on through 
fill sections of road. This will eliminate the necessity of 
clearing, excavating and building roads for construction 
access. Erosion potential can be reduced and pipelines will 
be more readily accessible. Reduction of erosion will 
lessen the impacts on site production, water quality, aquatic 
life and vegetation. 

b. Pipeline construction could be excluded from slopes in excess 
of 50%. Slopes of this magnitude usually have a moderate 
erosion potential. Pipeline right-of-way clearings could be 
limited to the minimum widths possible. 

Pipeline construction and associated access roads could be 
excluded from fragile sites or critical elk habitat areas. 
See Appendix VI -A and VI -C for approximate locations of these 
areas . 

The above measures will reduce the landslide and erosion 
potential, thus reducing the impacts on soil productivity, 
water quality, aquatic life and vegetation. No occupancy 
of critical elk habitat areas will mitigate the impacts of 
alteration of the critical habitat areas. 

c. Where pipelines could be damaged by windthrown timber or 
logging, they could be buried. This would reduce the danger 
of breakage and spills. 

d. All pipeline locations could be clearly marked. This will 
prevent breakage and possible spills that could result from 
forest management practices, such as road construction or 
site scarification. If pipelines are located along existing 
roads, markers will alert maintenance crews. 

e. The impacts of subsidence could be minimized by requiring 
that a plan, based upon pertinent geologic data, be prepared 
and implemented to prevent subsidence through the monitoring 
of elevations and the reinjection of fluids as necessary. 

The effects of oil and gas operation - induced earthquakes, 
should any occur, could be reduced or prevented by requiring 
the lessee to monitor seismic activity in the area and to 
alter production activity (fluid withdrawal or reinjection) 
if warranted by pertinent geologic investigation. 



107 



f. Pipelines, valves and pumps could be tested periodically to 
reduce the potential for leaks which could result in spills or 
chances of starting wildfires. 

g. If powerline right-of-ways are needed, the preceding miti- 
gating measures in sections 3.D.5.a. and 3.D.5.D., with the 
exception of burying, could be used. Power poles should be 
equipped with electrocution protection for raptors. 

6. Abandonment 

Measures to mitigate the environmental impacts of abandoning sites 
applies to exploratory wells and former producing fields. 

a. Wells could be plugged; storage tanks, structures and other 
facilities removed. Drilling pads, roads and facility sites 
could be ripped, topsoil redistributed, tilled and revege- 
tated. 

Pipelines could be left in place, flushed out and sealed. 
Pipeline location markers could be left in place. Residues 
could be disposed of at approved disposal sites. 

The above process of reclamation can hasten the return of 
vegetation, reduce erosion and have a favorable impact on soil 
production, water quality, aquatic life, wildlife, and aes- 
thetics. 

b. Wells could be properly plugged to prevent contamination of 
ground water aquifers. This will reduce the hazard of con- 
taminated ground water from entering surface water and pos- 
sibly destroying or inhibiting aquatic life. 

c. Locations of abandoned wells could be clearly marked. 

7. Ecological Interrelationships 

Measures described in preceding sections of this chapter to miti- 
gate the impacts of oil and gas operations on other components of 
the environment, collectively represent actions which could be 
taken to maintain or expedite the return of stable ecological 
interrelationships . 



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E. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ENHANCEMENT 

1. General Oil and Gas Lease Recommendations 

The following recommendations and/or stipulations should apply 
to all leases in the analysis area: 

a. Road and Drilling Site Construction 

(1) Existing roads, logging landings, quarry and stock- 
pile sites should be used whenever possible. 

(2) Immediately upon receipt of written notice from the 
Supervisor (or, in an emergency, the Authorized 
Officer) that weather or soil moisture conditions 
are such that operations will cause excessive damage 
to watershed, soils and aquatic habitat, Lessee 
should discontinue construction, earthmoving, and 
off-road surface distrubing exploration and develop- 
ment activities on the leased lands. Lessee should 
not resume operations prior to receipt of written 
authorization from the Supervisor. 

(3) It is recommended that all constructed roads and 
drilling sites be designed to the minimum standards 
and size necessary. Road subgrade widths should not 
exceed 22 feet in width, and grade limitations 
should be in accordance with Oregon state safety 
codes. All road and drilling site designs should be 
approved by the authorized BLM officer. 

(4) All cut and fill slopes resulting from construction, 
reopening or improvement of roads and/or drilling 
sites should be seeded to grass as construction 
progresses. Seeding should not be done between May 
1 and June 30. Grass seed should be in accordance 
with specifications furnished by the BLM. 

(5) It is recommended that roads and drilling sites be 
constructed only at locations approved by the BLM, 
and these roads and drilling sites should be con- 
structed and maintained in such a manner as to 
control and minimize channeling and other erosion. 

(6) End hauling, if necessary, should be included in 
road and drilling site designs, and should be 
approved by the BLM. 



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(7) Temporary roads should be waterbarred during use, and surfaced 
with gravel if used during wet weater. Temporary drilling 
sites should be surfaced with gravel if used during wet weather. 

It is recommended that all temporary roads and drilling sites 
shall be closed to vehicular travel, water barred or drained, 
ripped, topsoil redistributed, and revegetated within six (6) 
months after termination of use by the particular operator 
involved. 

(8) Permanent roads and well sites should be surfaced with gravel, 
permanent drainage installed, and the roads and sites main- 
tained to insure proper drainage. 

(9) Temporary stream crossings (fords) should be permitted only 
with BLM permission. Stream channels should not be blocked. 
No cuts or fills should be made near or in streams which will 
result in siltation or accumulation of debris. All damage to 
streams should be repaired to the satisfaction of the author- 
ized officer. 

(10) Topsoil should be removed and stockpiled prior to removal of 
overburden. Stockpiles should be located so as not to be 
covered by spoil materials and to facilitate their use in 
final rehabilitation. 

(11) On surface areas where soil has been distrubed, with the 
exception of road and drill site cut and fill slopes as 
stated in section 3.E.l.a.(4), compacted areas should be 
ripped, topsoil redistributed, and the area revegetated. 

(12) All survey monuments, witness corners, reference monuments, 
and bearing trees should be protected against destruction, 
obliteration, or damage. Any damaged or obliterated marker 1 . 
should be reestablished in accordance with accepted survey 
practices at expense of the lessee. 

(13) All operations should be conducted with a view to avoidance of 
forest fires and spontaneous combustion. Open burning of 
carbonaceous materials should be in accordance with state of 
Oregon burning laws . 

b. Preliminary Investigations 

All recommended measures in the preceding section 3.E.l.a. should 
be recommended for any road or truck trail construction that may be 
necessary for preliminary investigations. 



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Exploratory Drilling 

(1) Contingency plans for accidents should be developed, and 
blowout prevention equipment should be used. 

(2) Water withdrawal from streams for drilling purposes 
should have the approval by the BLM, and water rights for 
withdrawal should be obtained from the State of Oregon 
prior to requesting BLM approval. 

(3) Streams that are approved for water withdrawal should be 
monitored by the U. S. Geological Survey during dry 
seasons to insure that minimum flow requirements as 
established by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife 
are being met. 

(4) Mud pits should be lined with impervious material, 
acceptable to the B1M and U. S. Geological Survey autho- 
rized officers, to prevent seepage. 

(5) Protective dikes with at least four (4) feet of freeboard 
should be constructed around mud pits. 

(6) Residue from mud pits should not be disposed of on the 
lease areas or on any other BLM administered lands 
unless approved by the Authorized BLM Officer. 

(7) Mud pits should be filled and returned to a state that is 
susceptible to revegetation as soon as possible after 
drilling is completed. 

(8) Salt water and hot water, if produced during drilling 
operations, should be reinjected or contained in a manner 
that will not cause erosion, pollution of surface waters 
or damage to surrounding productive soils or vegetation. 

(9) No occupancy for exploratory drilling should be permitted 
within 200 feet of any stream, unless authorized by the 

BLM„ 

(10) The operator should make every effort to prevent, 

control, or suppress any fire in the operating area. 
Reports of uncontrolled fires should be immediately 
sent to the authorized officer or his representative 
and the State Forest Protective Association. 



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Flaring (burning) of gas from wells should be done 
in accordance with the State of Oregon laws that 
pertain to burning in forested areas. 

(11) Petroleum based wastes should be disposed of by 
methods that will prevent soil and water pollution 
and fire hazards. 

(12) Streams adjacent to drilling operations should be 
monitored by the U. S. Geological Survey for evi- 
dence of petroleum-related pollutants. 

(13) Protective dikes should be constructed around 
storage tanks and other facilities. The dikes, and 
the area between them and the tanks should create an 
area that is 10% larger in volume than the tank 
capacity. 

(14) Storage tanks should not be permitted on sidehills 
with a gradient in excess of 30%. 

Development 



The preceding recommendations for road and drilling site 
construction (Section 3.E.l.a.), and Exploratory Drilling 
(Section 3.E.I.C.) should be recommended for the devel- 
opment phase. 

Production 

(1) Transmission pipelines for oil or gas should tra 
verse existing roads where possible. Lines shou] 
be buried a minimum of two (2) feet below the top 
ditchlines where required by the authorized office 
When necessary to cross roads with pipelines, the 
roadway should be restored to its original condition 
or better. On through fill sections of existing 
roads, pipelines should be buried a minimum of five 
(5) feet from the fill toe where required by the 
authorized officer. 

(2) Pipelines should be buried at all creek crossings, 
where required by the authorized officer; and con- 
struction of creek crossings should be permitted 
between June 1 and September 30 only. 

(3) Pipeline construction should not be permitted on 
areas other than existing roads without prior approval 



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of the BLM District Manager. If pipeline construc- 
tion is approved on locations other than existing 
roads, the following items are recommended: 

(a) Pipeline construction should not be permitted 
on slopes in excess of 50% without prior 
approval of the BLM. 

(b) Pipeline right-of-way clearings should not 
exceed ten (10) feet in width, and should be 
water barred and seeded to grass. 

(c) All pipelines should be buried to a minimum 
depth of two (2) feet, where required by the 
authorized officer. 

(4) All pipeline locations, whether adjacent to existing 
roads, or cross country should be clearly marked with 
permanent type markers . 

(5) Lessee shall monitor its operations during produc- 
tion phases and initiate changes in production 
activities, as required by the U. S. Geological 
Survey, to reduce subsidence and/or seismic activity 
resulting from such production. Such changes may 
include fluid withdrawal and/or reinjection rates. 

(6) Wet weather operations should be permitted for pro- 
ducing fields, assuming that all construction is 
finished. 

(7) Pipelines, valves and pumps should be monitored, by 
approved methods, periodically to reduce the possi- 
bility of leaks. 

(8) Electric powerlines for producing fields should 
follow existing road right-of-ways. Road crossing 
heights for powerlines should be a minimum of 40 
feet above the roadway. 

(9) Electric power poles should be equipped with devices 
to prevent electrocution of birds. 

Abandonment 

(1) Exploratory wells and producing wells, when aban- 
doned should be plugged. 



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(2) Abandoned well locations should be clearly marked. 

(3) All storage tanks, structures and other facilities 
should be removed from the site. Drilling pads and 
facility sites should be ripped, topsoil redistri- 
buted and the areas planted to vegetative types 

as determined by the BLM. 

(4) Roads or other improvements built by the Lessee 
that, in the judgment of the Authorized BLM officer, 
can be used for other resource management programs 
should not be rehabilitated. Other roads should 

be rehabilitated in the manner described in (3) 
above . 

(5) Abandoned buried pipelines should be left in place, 
flushed out and sealed. Residue from pipelines 
should be disposed of on sites other than the lease 
area or other BLM administered lands, unless 
approved by the authorized BLM officer. Pipeline 
location markers should be left in place. 

2. Specific Oil and Gas Lease Recommendations 

The following recommendations and/or stipulations are for 
portions of specific leases, and apply to all phases of oil 
and gas operations with the exception of abandonment. 

(1) No surface occupancy or soil disturbing activities 
should be permitted on fragile areas located in 
portions of lease application numbers 9757, 9759, 
9760, and 13422 in the Loon Lake Area, portions of 
13388 in the Callahan Area, and portions of 13406, 
13407, 13408, 13409, 13410, 13411, 13413, 13414, 
13415, 13416, 13391, 13392 and 13393 in the Coquille 
River Area. The maps in Appendix VI -A show the 
locations of these fragile areas. Existing 
maintained roads in these areas could be used for 
transportation needs for oil and gas operations; 
however, the opening of abandoned roads should not be 
permitted. 

(2) No surface occupancy or soil disturbing activities 
should be permitted in the County Park located in 
N%NW%, Section 7, T. 28 S., R 9 W. , WPM on 



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lease application number 13406. (See Appendix III). 
The entire County Park is also classed as a fragile 
area, which is shown in Appendix VI -A. There are 
no existing roads within the County Park area. 
There is, however, an existing maintained County 
road adjacent to the south edge of the park. 

(3) No surface occupancy or soil disturbing activities 
should be permitted in critical habitat areas for 
elk and fish. These areas are located in portions 
of lease application numbers 9756, 9757, 9758, 
9759, 9760, and 13422 in the Loon Lake Area; 
portions of lease application numbers 13308, 13309, 
13391, 13393, 13406, 13410, 13411, 13412, 13413, 
13414, 13415 and 13416 in the Coquille River Area. 
Locations of these critical areas are illustrated 
in Appendix VI-C. Existing, maintained roads in 
the above areas could be used for oil and gas 
transportation needs. The opening of abandoned 
roads in the above areas should not be permitted. 



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F. RESIDUAL IMPACTS 

This section discusses the impacts which could remain after miti- 
gating measures recommended in section 3.E. are applied. Many of 
the impacts described in this section would occur only if accidents 
such as slides on roads or drill sites, oil spills or well blowouts 
occurred. The probability of such accidents occuring with the 
analysis area are remote; however, they cannot be completely 
ignored. The anticipated residual impacts discussed in this 
section are based on the assumptions made in Section 3. A. 3 of the 
scope and intensity of oil and gas operations in the analysis area. 

1. Road and Drilling Site Construction 

Roads and drilling sites constructed for oil and gas operations 
could be very similar to roads and landing sites constructed 
in the District for other resource management practices. 
Observations over the past years indicate that slides sometimes 
occur on permanent roads and rehabilitated roads after miti- 
gating measures have been employed. These slides have been of 
a minor nature in the past. Many times these slides will 
catch in the roadway itself, with very little or no spilling 
over on the outboard side. Slides have occurred in stream 
headwalls, but later day practices have mitigated this type 
of occurrence to minor proportions . 

Oil and gas operations would probably construct very few 
roads or drilling sites. Slides from roads or drilling sites, 
depending on size and road location, could cause sediment to 
enter streams. This condition is short lived because main- 
tenance crews clean up slides shortly after they occur. The; 
slides usually occur during periods of heavy rainfall and 
streams are at a high fast moving level with a convex con- 
figuration which precludes some siltation. Slides rarely 
occur during dry seasons when streams are low. The subsoil 
exposed at the origin of the slide could preclude vegetative 
production, but the area is small and is still part of the 
cutbank of the road. 

Drainage pipes (culverts) could become plugged with debris 
and cause erosion of fills or outboard banks. This is usually 
a temporary situation because maintenance crews open these pipes 
soon after they are plugged. 



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The residual impacts of road and drill site construction 
for oil and gas operations could be considered as minor. 

2. Preliminary Investigations 

No residual impacts would be expected from preliminary- 
investigations. 

3. Exploratory Drilling 

Well blowouts could have an impact on vegetation, soils 
and aquatic life by contamination of surface water with 
briny or hot water. This could result in loss of some 
aquatic plants, but most streams in the analysis area are 
on a very steep gradient in the headwater, and support a 
minor amount of aquatic animals, particularly fish. 

Oil spills into streams could have a serious impact if the 
oil were allowed to flow into the streams for a long period 
of time. Contingency plans should mitigate this possibility 
considerably. 

Fires, if allowed to escape into forested areas can reduce 
low vegetative cover and open land to erosion. Wildfires 
may or may not destroy merchantable timber, depending on 
many variables. 

Putting the above in perspective of the intensity and 
number of wells that are anticipated, if all of the above 
accidents happened, with the exception of wildfire, the 
impacts should be minor, and could possibly be mitigated 
satisfactorily through contingency plans. 

4. Development 

Development requires more area than exploratory drilling. 
The situations and residual impacts described in road and 
drilling site construction (section 3.F.I.) and exploratory 
drilling (section 3.F.3.) could apply to development. The 
fact that areas needed are larger, and more wells are involved 
increases the probability of accidents and the resulting 
residual impacts. 



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5. Production 

Pipeline leaks are a remote possibility. They could 
occur, however, through accidents or other unforeseen 
causes. Pipeline leaks could probably be confined to the 
road ditches or pipeline right-of-way, and in many cases 
would not reach water courses. The most serious leak or 
break would be at a stream crossing. Leaks would pro- 
bably be of short duration, thereby reducing the pos- 
sibility of permanent damage to land or water environ- 
ment. 

6. Abandonment 

The residual impacts after a road, well or production 
field is abandoned could be similar, if not the same, as 
those discussed in sections F.I., F.3., F.4, and F.5. of 
this section. 

7. Ecological Interrelationships 

Any action which alters the abiotic environment or 
biotic community could affect the ecological relation- 
ships to some degree, and mitigative measures may not 
prevent residual impacts. Despite all feasible pre- 
cautions, some oil and gas operations could upset the 
natural balance of ecosystems at least temporarily on '-he 
area disturbed by these operations. Actions or accidei s 
which destroy vegetation, disturb soil, expose bedrock 
degrade water quality, could cause some disruption of 
ecological interrelationships. In many cases the impact 
of the accidents could be mitigated. The relatively 
small area that is anticipated to be disturbed by oil and 
gas operations or accidents would probably have little 
overall effect on the ecosystem of the entire analysis 
area. 



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G. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SHORT-TERM USE AND LONG-TERM PRODUCTIVITY 

This section focuses on the relationship between short-term use 
of the environment for oil and gas operations and the long term 
productivity of the environment and its maintenance for other uses. 

"Short-term" use refers to the period during which oil and gas 
operations would take place. It would extend from preliminary- 
investigation through abandonment and completion of reclamation. 
The "short-term" may vary from a period of several months if 
preliminary investigations or wildcat drilling were unsuccessful 
to many years if commercial amounts of oil and gas were discovered. 

"Long-term" is considered to be the period of time beyond the point 
when all possible restoration has been completed. 

The relationships in this section will keep within the scope of 
anticipated oil and gas activity as defined in section 3. A. 2. 

1- Road and Drilling Site Construction 

a. Much road and logging landing construction has occurred 
on the analysis area in the past for the forest manage- 
ment program. Road construction and the mitigating 
measures therefore involved in oil and gas operations 
are similar if not the same as for roads constructed 
for forest management. Logging landings are similar 

in size to drilling sites. In fact, the oil and gas 
operations could probably use many of the existing roads 
and landings. 

It is anticipated, that the construction done by oil 
and gas operations will be minor, and if mitigating 
measures are followed, the long-term effects on environ- 
mental components such as soil and vegetative produc- 
tivity, aquatic life, terrestrial wildlife and ecological 
interrelationships will be minor, because the acreage 
involved in construction will be very small by comparison 
to the entire analysis area. 

b. Sedimentation of streams due to road construction on 
steep slopes or narrow ridges can be reduced by miti- 
gating measures, but cannot be entirely eliminated 
because of unforeseen actions such as road drainage 
being plugged by debris. These unforeseen acts can cause 
some temporary sedimentation of streams, but the situation 
is quickly remedied by the maintenance crews. 



119 



c. Permanent roads could provide access for harassment and 
poaching of wildlife such as deer and elk. The amount of 
permanent road that is expected to be constructed by oil 
and gas operations, when compared to the present existing 
system, would probably not contribute to a long-term 
reduction in wildlife. The above is based on mitigating 
measures that would prohibit oil and gas operations in 
critical wildlife areas. 

d. Road and drilling site construction could alter the 
natural balance of ecological interrelationships if 
large amounts of erosion or deep road cuts exposed a 
large amount of bedrock. The small amount of area that 
is anticipated to be involved would probably have little 
or no long-term effect on ecological interrelationships 
when compared to the entire analysis area. 

e. Archeological resources could be protected, if identified, 
by changing locations of roads and drilling sites, 
therefore no long-term impacts are anticipated. 

2. Preliminary Investigations 

Little or no road construction is anticipated for preliminary 
investigations. Most roads, if built, in this phase could 
be temporary, and the effect on long-term productivity would 
be less than those described in the preceding section G.l. 

3. Exploratory Drilling 

a. If ground water aquifers were inadvertently contaminated, 
it might take many years for the effects to be noted. 

b. Large oil spills reaching surface waters could have a 
detrimental long-term impact on vegetation in the 
vicinity of the spill. Production of aquatic vascular 
plants could be adversely affected, causing reduced 
production. 

c. Excessive use of water from streams during oil and gas 
operations could cause long lasting impacts on aquatic 
habitats and fish production if the stream flow were 
reduced below minimum flow requirements for an extended 
period of time. 

d. The loss of soil and vegetative productivity could be 
reduced in areas being occupied by mud pits or polluted 
by spills. These areas would be small, and can be 



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rehabilitated. Some additives used in the mud act as 
plant fertilizers. Long-term loss of soil or vegetative 
productivity is not anticipated. 

e. The projected rate of exploratory drilling on economics 
in the area could have very little effect. Drilling 
crews are small, and move out when drilling is finished, 
and it is anticipated that only one exploratory well will 
be drilled. 

Development 

a. Development could require more roads, wells, and larger 
areas than exploratory drilling. The short-term, long- 
term relationships could be the same as those described 

in preceding sections G.l. and G.3. The long-term effects 
of the impacts would increase as the area increases, but 
the effect--even if large fields are developed--could be 
minor when compared to the entire analysis area. 

b. The short-term rate of economics on the surrounding areas 
could increase somewhat over exploratory drilling, but 
the long-term effects could be minor, because many of the 
crews may leave when development is completed. 

Production 

a. If oil and gas were discovered, developed and produced, 
their use in the short-term would preclude long-term use 
of the reserves for energy or as raw material in manu- 
facturing processes. If oil and gas activities caused 
geological subsidence, the effects would extend into the 
long-term future. 

b. The short-term, long-term effects of pipelines could be 
similar to those of road construction if pipelines did 
not follow existing roads. If mitigating measures are 
followed, then impacts would come from unforeseen accidents, 
Accidents would undoubtedly be quickly rectified and 
long-term productivity of soil, aquatic life and other 
environmental components should not be adversely affected. 

c. Curtailment of forest management practices during or 
after oil and gas production is not expected. 



121 



Producing wells and facilities take a small amount of 
space, and the roads could be used for both purposes. 
Most of the area used for oil and gas production, when 
abandoned, could be returned to forest type vegetation. 

d. The short-term effect of oil and gas production on 

area land use patterns and economics is expected to be 
negligible. Long-term effects on land use and economy 
of local communities would come about only if oil and 
gas production far exceeds anyone's expectations. 

6. Abandonment 

Oil and gas operations end in abandonment and rehabilitation 
of the sites. Mitigating measures that protect or enhance 
the basic resources of soil and water quality and expedite 
the return of vegetation would help to restore balanced 
ecosystems and return the land to productive use. 

H. IRREVERSIBLE AND IRRETRIEVABLE COMMITMENT OF RESOURCES 

If oil and gas are discovered and produced, the major irreversible 
impact would be the extraction of oil and/or gas from the geologic 
formations, and the resulting reduction of natural reserves. 

In the event that subsidence occurs as a result of oil and gas 
extraction, it is possible that some small aquifers could be 
permanently impaired. 

There is a possibility that accidents may occur in spite of pre- 
cautions taken. If ground water aquifers were contaminated by 
accidents in drilling operations, water quality may be impaired 
for long periods of time. 

Where bedrock is exposed by landslide, or other unforeseen in- 
cidences, the natural balance of environmental processes can be 
restored only by natural processes operating over a period of 
geologic time. However, the incidences of such occurrences and 
the amount of area involved would be minimal. 



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PART IV 
RECORDATION OF PERSONS, GROUPS AND PUBLIC 
AGENCIES CONSULTED 



On January 27, 1976 a letter announcing the lease applications, the 
preparation of this EAR and request for comments was sent to 81 
individuals groups and agencies. (See Appendix XI for a complete list 
and copy of the letter.) In addition 11 copies were sent to local 
postmasters for display. 

On February 2, 1976 a news release was issued to the local media. 
(See Appendix XI . ) 

Verbal consultations have been held with the following: 

1. Mr. John Ely, Wildlife Biologist, Oregon Department of 
Fish and Wildlife. 

2. Mr. James L. Guy, Mobile Oil Corporation. 

3. Mr. Don Russell and Mr. John Fackler, U. S. Geologic Survey. 

Upon distribution of this EAR it is anticipated that additional 
consultations will occur. This portion of the EAR will be updated to 
reflect such consultation. 



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PART V 
INTENSITY OF PUBLIC INTEREST 



To date, the intensity of public interest toward the proposed oil and 
gas leases could be classed as mild. Twenty written responses have been 
received in the following categories: 

1. Government Agencies 10 

2. Industry Associations 1 

3. Wood Products Companies 2 

4. University Student Groups 2 

5. Advisory Board Members 3 

6. Elected Officials 1 

7. Other Individuals 1 

Very little verbal inquiry has been generated by our announcement. None 
of the written responses could be classed as purely negative. One 
response recommended that the proposal had sufficient potential impact 
to warrent preparation of an EIS. Approximately 9 of the responses 
identified concerns or recommended restrictions. Wood products firms 
and one agency were concerned about the interaction of their operations 
and those of the oil companies. 

Upon request, the State Historic Preservation Office conducted a search 
of properties listed on the National Registry and found that none were 
located within the lease areas. The Sandy Creek covered bridge, located 
on the Coquille River Area is listed on the statewide inventor/. Also, 
from their inquiries they anticipate a low density of archeolo, . cal 
sites within the lease area, but recommend that surveys be conducted 
prior to ground disturbing activities. 

A number of the responses requested more information to allow more ±.. 
depth comment. A copy of the EAR will be sent to these persons. Coos 
County requested a meeting upon completion of the EAR. 

In light of the fact that more public interest may be generated as the 
EAR is reviewed, it is anticipated that this section will be modified to 
reflect such interest. 



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PART VI 



PARTICIPATING STAFF 



This Environmental Analysis Report was prepared on the Coos Bay District, 
Bureau of Land Management by the following: 

Bob Cooke - Planning § Environmental Coordinator 

Jack Schutte - Chief, Branch of Forestry 

John Anderson - Fisheries Biologist 

Dick King - Wildlife Biologist 

Marty Townsend - Soils Scientist 

Phil Neal - Recreation Specialist 

Gene Stark - Forestry Technician 

Ron Kaufman - Chief, Division of Resources 



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PART VII 



SUMMARY CONCLUSION 



Major residual impacts and impacts on long term productivity would be 
expected to occur only as a result of accidents. The use of available 
industry technology, the adherence to recommended mitigating measures 
and the anticipated minor level of exploration and development make 
the probability of such accidents extremely remote. The following are 
a list of accidents and the major impacts which could occur: 

1. Land Subsidence - Elimination of ground water aquifers which 
in turn would adversely impact aquatic life in small tributary 
streams fed by that aquifer. Impacts would affect both short 
term and long term production. 

2. Well Blowouts - The short term destruction of a small amount 
of non-commercial vegetation, and the contamination of surface 
water with salt water or hot water could occur. 

3. Oil Spills and Pipeline Leaks - Impacts would be of a major 
nature only if these accidents occurred in or near water. 
Contamination would occur which could have a short term 
effect on aquatic life and water quality. 

4. Wildfire - Short term reduction of vegetative cover which 
could open the land to erosion; destruction of wildlife and 
wildlife habitat, and some reduction in timber values. 

5. Well Casing Leaks - Oil or briny water contamination of 
ground water aquifer. 



Some minor residual impacts would result from road and drilling site 
construction. The rugged topography and generally unstable nature of 
the analysis area would make minor slides and erosion inevitable when 
ground disturbing activities occur. Adherence to recommended mitigating 
measures and the light amount of new construction anticipated in these 
well roaded areas, however, would keep these impacts to a minimum. 

By comparison, the construction impacts of oil and gas operations would 
be the same, but of less magnitude, as those construction activities 
experienced in the timber harvest activity in the analysis area. 



129 - 



The principal irretrievable commitment would be the depletion of oil 
and/or gas from the geologic formations. After this depletion occurred 
production would stop and the area would be restored as nearly to 
original state as possible. Roads and drill sites which may enhance 
other resource management activities on the area would be maintained. 

To date, the public reaction to the proposed oil and gas leases on 
the Coos Bay District has been mild and overall supportive. It is 
anticipated that further public interest will be generated with the 
publication of this document. 



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BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1. Environmental Geology of Western Coos and Douglas Counties, Oregon 
(Bulletin 87, State of Oregon, 1975.) 

2. Mineral and Water Resources of Oregon (Report prepared by the 
United States Geologic Survey) U. S. Government Printing Office, 
1969. 

3. Timber Management - A Programmatic Environmental Analysis Record 
for Western Oregon. (U. S. Department of the Interior) April, 
1974. 

4. Forest Land Uses and Stream Environment (Oregon State University) 

5. Endangered Plants and Animals of Oregon, III Birds Special Report 
278, July 1969. 

IV Mammals Special Report 364, December 1972 (Agriculture Experi- 
ment Station - Oregon State University, Corvallis) 

6. Oregon Coastal Area - Including Southwestern Oregon Counties: 
Economic Survey and Analysis (State Water Resources Board, March 
1975) 

7. Baldwin, E. M., and Beaulieu, J. D., 1973, Geology and Mineral 
Resources of Coos County: Oregon Department Geology and Mineral 
Industries Bull. 80. 

8. Braislin, D. B., Hastings, D. D., and Snavely, P. D., Jr., 1971, 
Petroleum Potential of Western Oregon and Washington and Adjacent 
Continental Margins: Am. Assoc. Petrol. Geologists Memoir 15, v.l. 

9. Dott, R. H., Jr., 1966, Eocene Deltaic Sedimentation at f os Bay: 
Jour, of Geology, v. 74, no. 4. 

10. Snavely, P. D., Jr., and Wagner, H. S., 1963, Tertiary Geologi - 
History of Western Oregon and Washington: Washington Div. 
Mines and Geology Rept. of Invest. 22. 

REFERENCES 

Historical Sketch of Coos County, Its Cities and Industries (McLean, 
Ed.), Mimeographed, 1949. 

History of Southern Oregon (Walling), 1884. 

A Century of Coos and Curry (Peterson), 1952. 

The Sandal and the Cave, The Indians of Oregon (L. S. Cressman) 
Department of Anthropology - University of Oregon, 1962. 

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I-A-l Department of the Interior Secretarial Order 2948 

I-A-2 Cooperative Procedures Pertaining to Onshore Oil, 

Gas, and Geothermal Resources Operations - 
Implementation of Secretarial Order No. 2948. 

I-B Drilling Mud Materials 



APPENDIX I 



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APPENDIX I-A-I 



SECRETARIAL ORDER 



No. 2948 



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United States Department of the Interior/.! o la" ••'■■.'■■"•'■- . . 

IVU^jJy OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 72 GCT.'fj pV ['M 

l&$y WASHINGTON, D.C. 202-10 



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October 6, 1972 



ORDER NO. 2948 

Subject: Division of Responsibility Between the Bureau of Land 

Management and the Geological Survey for Administration 
of the Mineral Leasing Laws - Onshore 

Sec. 1. Purpo se . The purpose of this Order is to set forth the 
administrative and management procedures for Departmental onshore mineral 
leasing and operating activities. The spirit and intent of this Order 
flow from the Department's mineral management objectives of: orderly and 
timely resources development, protection of the environment, and receipt 
of fair market value for leased mineral resources. 

Sec. 1(a) Orderly and Timely Resource Development, includes the- 
Department's responsibilities to: 

(1) Foster i promote, and encourage the exploration for 

and the production of the mineral deposits from the leasable lands; 
promote competition; 

(2) Encourage the active development of the mineral 
deposits in the leasable lands in a manner compatible with the use of 
the same lands for other purposes; assure that mineral developers 
receive, the acreage necessary for economic plant investment, development, 
and production; 

(3) . Encourage the maximum ultimate recovery of the 
mineral deposit; prevent waste; promote the conservation of the mineral 
resources; 

(4) Assure adequate minimum production and diligent 
development requirements for mineral deposits. 

(b) Prot ection of the Environment includes the Department's 
responsibilities to: 

(1) Assure that mineral exploration and production be 
conducted with the maximum protection of the environment; 



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(2) Assure the rehabilitation of disturbed lands; 

(3) Assure that precautions are taken to protect 
^■public health and safety; and 

(4) Assure full compliance with the spirit and 
objectives of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, other 
Federal environmental legislation, and supporting Executive Orders 
and regulations. 

(c) Receipt of Fair Market Value for L eased Mineral Resources 
includes the Department 's responsibilities to assure the public a fair 
market value return for the use of public lands and the disposition 
of its mineral resources. 

Sec. 2. Agency Responsibilities . The Bill exercises at the Bureau 
level the Secretary's discretionary authority to determine whether or 
not leases, permits, and licenses are to be issued. The Bureau of Land 
Management is responsible for issuing mineral leases, permits, and licenses, 
and is the office of record in mineral leasing matters. The Geological 
Survey is responsible for all geologic, engineering, and economic value 
determinations for the Department's mineral management program. 'These 
determinations include: the mineral characteristics of lease and permit 
areas; parcelling; amounts of bonds; royalties; unit values; rentals; 
mineral resource evaluations; reserves; investment, diligent development, / 
and minimum production requirements; and all other terms and conditions \ 
relating to mineral operations under leases and permits. Geological 
Survey' exercises the Secretary's delegated authority regarding operations 
conducted within the area of operation by permittees, lessees, and 
licensees and determines the actions to be taken by them from the stand- 
point of the development, conservation, and management of mineral resources 
under the jurisdiction of the Department. GS will refer to BUI any 
instances of noncompliance with lease terms requiring cancellation 
action, and BLM will inititate the necessary action. 

For the purpose of this Order, the area of operation is defined 
as that area of the present and planned mine, oil and gas field, or 
geothermal resource field exploratory, development, and production 
operations, as presented in an approved exploration or mining plan, 
drilling permit, oil, gas, or geothermal field development plan, 
or plan for the abandonment of wells or operations. The area of operation 
may cover a fraction of a lease or permit area, or it may cover several 
lease or permit areas . It encompasses the general area needed for 
storage piles, spoils piles, tailings ponds, on-project mill sites, 
flow lines, separators, surge tanks, storage tanks, on-project truck 
or rail-loading stations, drill pads, mud pits, workshops, compressors, 
generators, on-project power plants, and other such facilities used 
for on-project mine, oil and gas field, or geothermal resource field 
exploratory, development, and production operations. 



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(a) Environm ental Protection . The Bureau of Land Management , 
in cooperation vith the Geological Survey, formulates the general require- 
ments to be incorporated in leases, permits, and licenses for the pro- 
tection of the surface and non-mineral resources and for reclamation. 

The Geological Survey, before approving exploration and mining plans, 
drilling permits, oil, gas, or geothermal field development plans, or 
plans for the abandonment of v/ells or operations, consults with the 
Bureau of Land Management on the adequacy of the surface use, environ- 
mental protection, and reclamation aspects of the plans and will not 
grant approval if inconsistent with the BLM's recommendations without 
further discussions with ELM. If differences remain after these further 
discussions, the resolution is made by the Assistant Secretary — Mineral 
Resources and the Assistant Secretary — Public Land Management. If required, 
the Under Secretary resolves any remaining differences. The BIM is respons- 
ible for compliance examinations of environmental protection requirements 
outside the operating area and for reporting infractions to the GS for 
discussions with, or orders to, the permittee, lessee, or licensee. GS 
examines operations to ensure compliance wiLh environmental protection 
and rehabilitation requirements inside the operating area. With respect 
to approval of access roads, pipelines, utility routes and other surface 
uses outside the operating area, the Bureau of Land Management has the 
primary responsibility but obtains the recommendations of the Geological 
Survey before taking final action, Orders to operators for any remedial 
action is the responsibility of the Geological Survey. 

(b) Expertise. The Geological Survey is responsible for main- 
taining engineering, geologic, geophysical, economic, and other technical 
expertise needed by the Department to assure compliance with applicable 
laws, operating regulations, and the objectives of the Department's mineral 
management program. The Bureau of Land Management is responsible for 
maintaining expertise needed by the Department for action on applications 
filed with BLM under the mineral leasing laws to assure compliance with 
applicable laws, leasing regulations, and the objectives of the Department's 
mineral management program. 

(c) Contacts with Applicants . 

(1) Prior to the issuance of mineral leases, permits, and 
licenses, the Bureau of Land Management will represent fhe Secretary in 
dealing with applicants. 

(2) After issuance and during the exploration, development, 
and production phases of leases, permits, and licenses, and until a lease, 
permit, or license has terminated (at which time management is the sole 
responsibility of BLM) the Geological Survey is the sole representative of 
rhi: Secretary in all matters relating to the supervision of operations. 

Sec. 3. Is suance of Mineral L eases, Pe rmits, and Licenses . 

(a) Applications . Prior to the. issuance of mineral prospecting 
permits, leases, or licenses, the Bureau of Land Management refers all 
applications Cor such permits, leases, or licenses to the Geological Survey 
for a report as outlined in (b) below. 



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under .the mineral leasing laws and regulations, if sufficient information 
is known about a mineral deposit to warrant offering the deposit for lease 
by competitive sale and to notify the Bureau of Land Management of its 
'eternination. If the Geological Survey finds that sufficient information 
*As not available to warrant competitive leasing, it notifies the Bureau 
of Land Management of its conclusions so that the Bureau of Land Management 
may issue a prospecting permit or noncompetitive lease, as appropriate. 
The Geological Survey establishes prospecting requirements for prospecting 
permits. When lands are to be leased, the Geological Survey determines 
and reports, as appropriate, on: the mineral characteristics of lease 
and permit areas; parcelling; amounts of bonds; royalties; unit values; 
rentals; mineral resource evaluations; reserves; investments; diligent 
development and minimum production requirements; and all other terras and 
conditions pertaining to lease operations, including environmental and 
surface rehabilitation stipulations relating to mineral exploration and 
extraction. With respect to applications for licenses, the Geological 
Survey determines and reports as to whether the license may be issued. 

(2) The Geological Survey is responsible for determining 
whether a prospecting permittee has demonstrated that the lands contain a 
mineral deposit having the characteristics required by law and regulations 
to qualify for a preference right lease and to notify the Bureau of Land 
Management. 

(3) The Bureau of Land Management refers to the Geological 
Survey all other type applications received which, if approved, may affect 
operations on existing permits, leases, or licenses. 

(4) The Bureau of Land Management notifies the Geological 
Survey of known oil, gas, and geothermal resource geophysical exploration 
activity, including the area involved, the type of survey employed, and 
the name of the operator. 

(5) All applications for noncompetitive oil and gas, 
mineral, and geothermal resource leases filed with the Bureau of Land 
Management will, prior to issuance of a lease, be referred to the 
Geological Survey for a determination as to whether the lands are within 

a known geologic structure (KGS), a known geothermal resource area (KGRA) , 
or a known leasing area (KLA) . .,' . . 

(b) Mineral Resource Evaluation Rep ort. GS is responsible for 
submitting a report of its findings, mineral resource evaluations, and 
resultant recommendations to the ELM, together with a summary explanation 
of how the resource evaluations were developed from geophysical, geologic, 
economic, and engineering data available at the time of the evaluation. 
The BLM reviews these findings and recommendations in light of multiple- 
use management requirements and will not issue leases or permits incon- 
sistent with the findings and recommendations without further, discussion 
with GS. If differences remain after further discussion, the resolution 
is made by the Assistant Secretary—Mineral Resources and the Assistant 
Secretary — Public Land Management . If required, the Under Secretary 
resolves any remaining differences . ■ 

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(c) Cov.\p a t L 1 1 v e Lease Sales. The Bureau of Land Management 
advertises and conducts competitive lease sales. The Geological Survey's 

resource evaluations will be used and the Ceological Survey will have 
'representatives at the sale and renders a post-sale recommendation to 
BLM regarding acceptance or rejection of the bids, which must be confirmed 
in writing. 

(d) Files and Reco rds. BLM maintains the official application, 
permit, and lease case files and forwards to the Geological Survey a copy 
of. each permit, lease, and license, together with copies of relevant 
correspondence thereafter conducted by the Bureau. The GS forwards to 
the BLM copies of mining and exploration plan applications, drilling 
permit applications, and relevant items submitted by the applicants 
directly to the GS, except confidential proprietary information cited 
under paragraph (e) below. . . • 

(e) Security of Information . The Geological Survey is responsi- 
ble for receiving and protecting for the confidential use of the Federal 
Government all proprietary geological, geophysical, engineering, economic, 
statistical, or other information, mineral resource data, and well logs 
required to be submitted under Title 30 CFR, Parts 200, 211, 216, 221, 

231, 270, and related regulations. The Survey' Of f ice receiving such 
information is designated the. Office of Control for those, data. Authorized 
officials of BLM or other surface-managing agencies having a need to see 
such information will normally make appropriate arrangements to visit the 
Office of Control for access to such data and for technical advice based 
on it pertinent to their management responsibilities. 

Sec. 4. Mineral Reports. The Geological Survey is responsible for 
preparing and submitting to the Bureau of Land Management mineral 
classification and evaluation reports with respect to the leasable mineral 
value of lands within proposed exchanges, withdrawals,' sales, land entries, 
or other disposals and all other land transactions. The Geological Survey, 
upon request, also prepares and furnishes mineral reports and other 
information to the Bureau of Land Management needed for its use in long- 
range multiple-use planning or inventory of the public lands * 

Sec. 5. General Relationships . Such additional references, reports, 
interchange of information, and advice shall be made by or between the 
Bureau of Land Management and Geological Survey as may be necessary to 
perpetuate or improve current practice and provide effective administra- 
tion of the mineral leasing laws. 

The Bureau of Land Management and the Geological Survey must submit 

to each other for review and recommendations any proposed changes in 

standard lease terms, regulations, instructions, or other changes that 
would affect each agency's management responsibilities. 



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Sec. 6. Implementation of Order . It is intended that there will 
be no duplication by the BLM or GS of the functions assigned by this 
Order. BLM and GS will promptly bring their manuals and instructions 
into agreement with the terms and the spirit and intent of this Order. 

Sec. 7. Revocation . The Secretary's instruction (procedures 
relating to the administration of the mineral leasing laws - General 
Land Office and Geological Survey) dated September 22, 1925 (51 L. D. 
219) is revoked. 



■ ? />•//'■ 

OCT - 6 1972 ) &4M £?r -V//7M 

Secretary of the Interior 



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APPENDIX I -A- 2 



COOPERATIVE PROCEDURES PERTAINING To 



ONSHORE OIL, GAS AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES 







IMPLEMENTATION OF 



SECRETARIAL ORDER NUMBER 2948 



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COOPERATIVE PROCEDURES 

These procedures provide for the mutual cooperation between U. S. 
Geological Survey (GS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) concerning 
oil, gas, and geothermal resources operations in accordance with 
Secretarial Order No. 2948. 

The designation of BLM in this agreement shall refer to the responsi- 
bilities of the BLM District Managers in the Western States or to the 
Director of the Eastern States Office, as applicable. 

The designation of GS in this agreement shall refer to the responsi- 
bilities of the District Engineers, the Alaska Area Oil and Gas Super- 
visor, the Western Area Geothermal Supervisor, and in some instances, 
the Eastern Area Oil and Gas Supervisor, as applicable. 

This agreement pertains to the cooperative procedures between the two 
bureaus with respect to oil, gas, or geothermal resources operations 
conducted within an area of operation on those leases where BLM is the 
responsible surface managing agency or where reserved minerals are 
involved. 

In the event of a conflict between special lease stipulations and the 
instructions herein contained, this agreement shall prevail. With only 
those exceptions herein specified, the GS shall be the sole represen- 
tative of the Secretary with respect to direct contact with the lessees 
and operators in matters related to operations as specified in Section 
2(c)(2) of Secretarial Order No. 2948. 

For the purpose of this working agreement, the Area of Operation (AO) 
shall be outlined on the map attached to the approved plan of operations. 
Such AO will involve joint GS/BLM management roles and responsibilities." 
Operations on that portion of the AO involving exploration, development" 
and production of the leased mineral deposit shall be the exclusive 
jurisdiction of the GS. All other uses not appurtenant to the mineral 
operations will be the exclusive jurisdiction of the BLM. The following 
general guidelines are provided to describe the exterior boundaries of 
an AO: 

1. For an exploratory well : For wells two miles or more from 
the nearest producing well, the AO shall be established as 
160 acres if it is an oil or geothermal resources test and 
640 acres if a gas test. 

2 - For a producing field : For wells within or adjacent to 
producing fields, the AO shall embrace the actual acreage 
then spaced for production from the target reservoir plus, 

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if necessary, the spacing unit for the well then under 
consideration. For wells outside the established productive 
limit of a field but within two miles thereof, the AO shall 
be the same size as the spacing unit then established for 
wells in the nearby field. However, in any instance where 
the well is projected to test a reservoir not then productive 
within two miles of the location, the AO shall be 160 acres 
if it is an oil or geothermal resources test and 640 acres 
if a gas test. However, only the surface use area delineated 
on the map attached to the plan of operations and approved 
by both the GS and BLM shall be for the exclusive use of 
the operator while such operations are being conducted thereon. 
Sould a well projected as an oil test be completed as a gas 
well, or vice versa, any additional surface use required by 
such completion will be subject to the pertinent approval 
procedures hereinafter set forth. 

Regardless of the AO so established, the GS shall be solely 
responsible for all oil, gas, or geothermal resources opera- 
tions conducted thereon, including the enforcement of the 
surface protection and rehabilitation requirements, on approved 
surface use areas whereon such operations are normally conducted 
as follows: 



wvi± biteb - inciuaes zae area required ror arming . m 

and/ or producing the well, normally 3 to 5 acres. j } 

Tank batteries and treatment area - actual use areas 

as established by the approved plan of operations. ! ! 

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For additional surface uses related to operations inside the AO but 



Gathering lines to and from the wells to the tank 
batteries or treatment facilities and access roads 
covered by the approved plan of operations. 



rui ctuui uj-uucLi. suiiiite ui>ei reiateu \.u uperatioiib msxae zne ru dug pfi 

outside the production facilities or operations areas defined above, 
and not covered by an approved plan of operations, the operator shall 
submit his proposed plan of operations to the GS. The GS will not 
approve any such plan for additional surface uses until the require- 
ments of Part D of this agreement have been satisfied. For surface 
uses within the AO other than those related to operations, the BLM 
shall be solely responsible for authorizing such uses and the surface 
user (oil, gas, or geothermal resources operators or other parties 
such as recreationists, special use permittees, etc.) shall submit 
their proposals directly to BLM who shall consult with GS to prevent or « 

reduce any surface use conflicts. BLM will not approve any surface use 



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within an AO which is contrary to GS recommendations without further 
discussions with GS. Any unresolved issues will be referred to appro- 
priate Department officials for resolution. 

All surface use requirements outside the limits of established Areas 
of Operations shall be the sole responsibility of the BLM. 



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A - PRELIMINARY FIELD INVESTIGATION (discretionary) 

The Surface Disturbance Stipulations, which will be made a part of each 
oil and gas and geothermal resources lease, require that the operator, 
prior to his entry upon the land or the disturbance of the surface 
thereof for drilling or other purposes, shall furnish both the GS and 
the appropriate surface managing agency with a copy of a map and an 
explanation of the nature of the anticipated activity and surface 
disturbance. Maps furnished in this regard will not be accepted if 
on a scale less than one inch to the mile. Work such as surveying for 
a well site or access route is covered by this stipulation. 

Upon receipt of the required map and the explanation of the proposed 
activity and if BLM is the surface managing agency, or where reserved 
minerals are involved, the GS will: 

1. Contact both the operator and the BLM to schedule a coordinated 
joint field examination of the area if such inspection is deemed 
necessary by GS. In those instances where an inspection is con- 
sidered unnecessary, the GS will not proceed further without first 
contacting BLM as to its need for a field inspection. If BLM 
desires such an inspection, GS will coordinate arrangements with 
the operator, participate in any such inspection, and furnish 
appropriate data. If neither bureau requires an inspection, no 
further action is necessary until such time as an application 

for permit to drill is filed with the GS. The time for such 
inspections will be scheduled as soon as possible, considering work 
priorities; however, the BLM will, in most instances, not be 
requested to set an inspection date that falls less than seven 
days from the date on which it is established that either one or 
both require an on-site examination. In no event will the GS 
make a commitment to the operator as to when the inspection will 
be conducted until after BLM and GS have agreed upon a mutually 
acceptable date. This time may be reduced for high priority 
situations. The GS will encourage operators to file such maps and 
explanations at least 15 days in advance of the date on which they 
wish to enter upon the leasehold. 

2. Confer with BLM and the operator to select the most feasible and 
environmentally acceptable areas for: 

a. Well sites (Geologic factors and both Federal and State 
regulations must be considered) . 

b. Access routes. 

c. Any other proposed surface use. 

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3. Delineate on the maps supplied by the operator the AO which shall 
be established in accordance with the foregoing, the surface 

use activity areas within the AO which are directly related to 
the proposed operations, and the access route to the AO and the 
surface use areas which were tentatively approved by BLM, GS, and 
the operator in the joint field examination. 

4. Encourage the operators to submit preliminary field development, 
plans or drilling schedules to permit lead time for evaluating 
environmental considerations, resource conflicts, land use planning 
alternatives and revised plans prior to official submission. Furnish 
BLM such plans or schedules. 

5. Take note of the resources which will be affected, the conflicts 
that may occur, and also the environmental impacts which are 
anticipated if the activity use takes place. 

6. Furnish any information requested by BLM should BLM determine 
that it must prepare an environmental analysis record (EAR) as 
provided in item 7, page A-3 . 

7. Request BLM's surface protection and rehabilitation require- 
ments for the contemplated surface use areas involved which will 
be made part of any subsequently approved plan of operations for 
such AO. 

8. Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) if the EAR pre- 
pared by the BLM, as provided for in item 7, page A-3, indicates 
that an EIS is necessary to comply with the requirements of Section 
102 (2) (c) of the National Environment Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) . 

Upon receipt of the required map and the explanation of the proposed 
activity, the BLM will: 

1. Review the Unit Resource Analysis and Management Framework plan 
for the Resource Area, noting existing or alternate access routes, 
existing and proposed resource uses in the area, what resources 
will be affected by the proposed use, known archaeological sites, 
etc. 

2. Notify the GS in those instances where BLM determines that there 

is a need for a joint field inspection. However, in those instances 
where BLM considers an inspection to be unnecessary, it will 
participate in a joint inspection if GS desires such an examination 
and will, regardless of whether a joing on-site inspection is made, 
furnish GS with its surface protection and rehabilitation require- 
ments. 



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Delineate on the maps furnished by the operator such items as 
existing or alternate access routes if not shown, and furnish 
the GS this information. 

Confer with the GS and the operator to select the most feasible 
and environmentally acceptable areas for: 

a. Well sites (Geologic factors and both Federal and State 
regulations must be considered) . 

b. Access routes. 

c. Any other proposed surface use. 

Delineate on the maps supplied by the operator the AO which shall 
be established in accordance with the foregoing, the surface 
use activity areas within the AO which are directly related to 
the proposed operations, and the access route to the AO and the 
surface use areas which were tentatively approved by BLM, GS, and 
the operator in the joint field examination. 

Take note of the resources which will be affected, the conflicts 
which may occur, and also the environmental impacts which are 
anticipated if the activity use takes place. 

Where significant surface disturbance will occur as a result of 
surveying operations, prepare an environmental analysis record (EAR) 
with respect to such activity. 



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B - PROCESSING AND ISSUANCE OF A DRILLING PERMIT 
INVOLVING FEDERAL OIL AND GAS OR GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES LEASES 



GS will: 



Where BLM is the surface managing agency, or where reserved 
minerals are involved, send a copy of all applications for 
permits to drill exploratory and development wells, including 
the development plan and other appropriate information, to 
the proper BLM office immediately upon receipt of each such 
application (in high priority situations, the BLM will also 
be contacted verbally to expedite issuance of a drilling 
permit) . Other appropriate data includes the "12-point 
plan" required by the GS but no subsurface data of a proprietary 
nature or other proprietary data or information will be 
furnished BLM; however, BLM can, upon request, inspect but 
not copy such data and information in the GS office. 

a. If the application is based on and follows closely the 
arrangements tentatively agreed upon at a preliminary 
joint field inspection as outlined in Section A, a 
second joint inspection will not be necessary. 

b. If the application deviates appreciably from the ar- 
rangements tentatively agreed upon at a preliminary 
joint field inspection as outlined in Section A, or if 
there has not been a preliminary joint field inspection, 
the procedure outlined in 2 and 3 below will be followed. 

Contact the appropriate BLM office and the operator to establish 
a time and place to meet for a joint inspection of the drill 
site and access route for all exploratory well proposals and for 
development wells, if such inspection is deemed necessary by GS. 
In those instances where an inspection is considered unnecessary, 
the GS will not proceed further without first contacting BLM as 
to its need for a field inspection. If BLM desires such an 
inspection, GS will coordinate arrangements with the operator 
participate in any such inspection, and furnish appropriate data. 
Whether or not either bureau requires an on-site examination, 
BLM's surface protection and rehabilitation requirements will be 
requested and made a part of the approved plan of operations. 
The time for these inspections will be scheduled as soon as 
possible, considering work priorities; however, the BLM will, in 
most instances, not be requested to set an inspection date that 
falls less than seven days from the date on which it is established 



/SI 



either one or both require an on-site examination. In no event 
will the GS make a commitment to the operator as to when the 
inspection will be conducted until after BLM and GS have agreed 
upon a mutually acceptable date. This time may be reduced for high 
priority situations. The GS will encourage operators to file all 
applications at least 30 days in advance of the time they wish to 
enter upon the leasehold. 

3. Schedule, insofar as possible, each inspection so that several 
future sites, access roads, etc., can be inspected at one time. 

4. Prepare an environmental impact analysis (EIA) 1/ utilizing BLM 
input for either 1(a) or 1(b) of this Part B on all exploratory 
wells and on those development wells which GS determines an EIA 
is required. Furnish BLM a copy of the EIA (the GS worksheet, 
Form 2-A, will not be furnished) or a statement of why one was 
not prepared for inclusion in BLM's official case file. All EIA's 
prepared in this regard will take into consideration the total 
aspects of the proposed operations including access to the AO 

and the proposed surface use areas within the AO. 

Supply relevant data requested by BLM in those instances where 
it is determined that an EIA is not required but BLM finds 
it necessary to prepare an EAR to complete its records as provided 
in item 3, page B-4. 

5. Prepare the EIS if the EIA indicates that one is necessary in 
order to comply with requirements of Section 102(2) (c) of the NEPA. 

6. Delineate the AO and the approved surface use areas within the AO, 
including the access route to the AO and the surface use areas 

on the maps provided by the operator and make such map a part of 
the approved plan of operations. If a field examination is required, 
the delineation of the surface use areas shall not be made until 
after the field examination and mutual agreement is reached with 
BLM. 

7. Where privately owned surface is involved in the surface use 
areas or access thereto, the operator will be required to furnish 

a copy of the contract or agreement with the private surface owner. 

8. Supply the operator with the name, address, and both the home and 
office telephone numbers of the BLM contact who will be available 
for consultation during construction and rehabilitation activities. 



1/ Corresponds to BLM Environmental Analysis Record (EAR) 



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9. Furnish BLM the name address, and both the office and home tele- 
phone numbers of the GS Supervisor or the District Engineer to 
contact in case of emergencies or incidents of noncompliance with 
the surface use and rehabilitation requirements of the lease or 
approved plan of operations. 

10. Furnish immediate notification of all approved drilling permits 
to the appropriate BLM office. 

11. Require the operator to notify the GS of the exact day field 
operations will begin in areas where significant surface values, 
such as archaeological sites, require special protection. GS 
will immediately notify the BLM of such date. 

12. Advise the operator that the GS will expect full compliance with 
the applicable laws, regulations, and the approved plan of opera- 
tions; and further, that the GS will consider the operator to be 
fully responsible for the actions of his subcontractors. 

13. Require all activities to be conducted so as to conform to the 
approved plan of operations and subsequent amendments made thereto 
by GS or requested by BLM. BLM may not directly amend any approved 
plan of operations but may suggest changes to GS which it believes 
should be incorporated as a result of circumstances not contemplated 
at the time the plan was first approved. The GS will not approve 
any plan of operations which is inconsistent with BLM recommendations 
as to surface protection and rehabilitation requirements. Any 
unresolved disagreement with the original permit conditions or 
proposed amendments thereto will be referred to appropriate Depart- 
mental officials for resolution under procedures established by 
Section 2(a) of Secretarial Order No. 2948. 



BLM will : 

1. Upon receipt of the application for a drilling permit forwarded 
by the GS, notify the GS immediately in those instances where BLM 
determines that there is a need for a joint field inspection. 
However, in those instances where BLM considers an inspection to 
be unnecessary, it will participate in a joing inspection if GS 
desires such an examination and will, regardless of whether a joint 
inspection is made, furnish GS with its surface protection and 
rehabilitation requirements. 

2. Provide GS with the name, address, and both the office and home 
telephone numbers of the BLM representative who will be available 
for consultation during construction and rehabilitation activities. 



/£3 



3. Furnish input data to GS for use in the preparation of an EIA. 
Where GS determines that an EIA is not required for a development 
well, BLM may individually, as it determines necessary, prepare 
an EAR to complete its records. BLM will furnish GS with a com- 
pleted copy of its EAR. 

4. Make a recommendation to the GS as to whether an environmental 
impact statement is needed. 

5. Furnish the GS with a report, within ten working days following 
the joint inspection or within ten working days after receipt of 
the application for a permit to drill, if no joint inspections 

was deemed necessary by either bureau, setting forth the recommenda- 
tions and requirements necessary to protect the surface resources 
and the rehabilitation requirements to be included in the drilling 
permit. The report shall confirm in writing and delineate on a 
map the AO, the surface use areas within the AO, and the access 
route to the AO and the surface use areas as agreed upon among 
BLM, GS, and the operator during their joint inspection, or as a 
result of discussions, or both. For high priority situations 
the BLM representative may, with the concurrence of the District 
Manager, verbally inform the GS representative of the BLM require- 
ments for the drilling permit. This verbal communication shall be 
followed up with a written report to the GS within 10 days thereafter. 

6. At the request of GS, work directly with the operator in the 
rehabilitation of disturbed areas. 

7. Contact Federal and State agencies and other operators in the 
area for information which will be helpful in implementing a 
successful rehabilitation program. 

8. Make available to the GS and the operator any known or new re- 
habilitation procedures for the specific area of operation. 

9. Provide GS with a written declaration prior to commencement of 
drilling operations, as to whether or not a water well is desired 
in case the well encounters a useable fresh water zone and is later 
abandoned. If at abandonment BLM elects to assume further responsi- 
bility for the well, it will reimburse the operator for any re- 
coverable casing left in the hole solely because it is to be completed 
as a water well. The payment shall be based upon cost figures 
supplied by the operator prior to abandonment. 



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The operator will abandon the well to the base of the deepest fresh 
water zone of interest as required by the GS and will complete the 
surface clean-up operations as required by the drilling permit. BLM 
will accept liability for the well after GS has approved the abandon- 
ment and the surface clean-up operations have been completed to BLM's 
satisfaction. BLM will furnish GS with a written acceptance of all 
future responsibility for the well including its proper abandonment 
when it is no longer needed as a water well. In the event BLM requires 
a quitclaim deed from the operator, a copy thereof will be furnished to GS. 



/b6 



C - COMPLIANCE WITH TERMS AND CONDITIONS 



EMERGENCY SITUATIONS 



GS will: 

1. Conduct inspections to insure that the operator is in compliance 
with terms and conditions of the lease and is conducting oper- 
ations in accordance with the applicable regulations and the approved 
plan of operations. 

2. Seek BLM assistance and expertise in surface management problems 
involving noncompliance with terms and conditions or stipulations, 
or for modifications requested by the operator. 

3. Notify BLM of noncompliance which may require rehabilitation. 

4. As appropriate, request the BLM to make inspections to assure 
compliance with the surface protection requirements of the approved 
plan of operations. 

5. Seek all available help, including BLM, on major accidents or spills 
involving flowline or lease gathering facility spills, breaks in 
sludge pits, etc. Seek BLM expertise in rehabilitation and clean 

up operations. 

BLM will: 



1. Conduct inspections to insure compliance with the surface protec- 
tion requirements of the lease and the approved plan of operations 
and will note operator noncompliance therewith. Except in an 
emergency, no instructions or directions will be given to the 
operator or his subcontractors without GS approval. 

2. Notify GS immediately of all such incidents of noncompliance with 
the surface protection requirements of the lease or approved plan 
of operations. 

3. Contact the operator directly only in cases involving an emergency 
such as accidental spills, flowline breaks, or other situations 
endangering health, safety, or significant resources. 

GS will be immediately notified of any such actions taken by BLM. 
At that time GS will assume jurisdiction to expedite the necessary 
operations to resolve the emergency and will request BLM's assist- 
ance as needed in matters of surface clean up and rehabilitation. 



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4. If requested, furnish help during and after the emergency for 

clean up operations, and also furnish expertise for any required 
rehabilitation. 

The agency responsible for seeking curative action on instances on 
non-compliance with the terms and conditions of the lease or the approved 
plan of operations will take the necessary action when notified of the 
non-compliance by the other agency. 



C - 2 

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D - MAINTENANCE OF FIELD ACTIVITIES 



INSIDE THE AREA OF OPERATION 



GS will: 



The operator must submit to GS enough information concerning the 
proposed activity to allow evaluation of possible surface dis- 
turbance . 

Notify BLM of the proposed surface disturbing activity and furnish 
all available information. 

Process the proposed plan only after receiving the input of BLM 
with respect to surface protection and rehabilitation requirements 
and make such requirements a part of the approved plan. 

Make its approval of the plan subject to such conditions as shall 
be mutually agreeable to both the GS and BLM. 



BLM will: 



When requested by the GS, assist in resolving noncompliance with 
the terms and conditions or stipulations of any approved plan. 

Make periodic inspections to assure that the operator is complying 
with the surface protection and rehabilitation requirements of 
the lease and the approved operating plan and will notify GS when 
it becomes aware of any operating condition warranting correction. 
The BLM, on its own initiative, may make recommendations to GS for 
the maintenance or rehabilitation of existing conditions adversely 
affecting the surface or other resources within an AO. 



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Require operators to file for approval a suitable plan with GS 

prior to undertaking any new construction, reconstruction or ™ 

alteration of facilities, including roads, dams, reservoirs, etc., 

which will result in additional surface disturbance. 



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Make periodic inspections to assure that the operator is properly 

maintaining the facilities. 9 



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Respond timely to GS's notification that a plan has been filed for « 

additional surface use within an AO by providing its recommended I 

surface protection or rehabilitation requirements. 



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II 4. Notify GS of all applications which involve other surface uses 

■ of lands within the AO for GS recommendations prior to approval 

of the application. 

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E - SURFACE USE MANAGEMENT OUTSIDE 



THE AREA OF OPERATION 



BLM will: 



Resolve surface use conflicts to the satisfaction of all users 
if possible; failing this, BLM will take appropriate steps to 
eliminate the conflict generally with priority consideration given 
to the continued mineral development. In that regard the comments 
and recommendations of the GS will be requested. 



GS will: 



1. Contact BLM immediately if it becomes aware of any conflicts 
involving surface use. 

2. Make recommendations to BLM if production facilities are being 
vandalized so protection measures, such as limiting or restricting 
public access into the area, may be initiated, i 

3. Make recommendations to both the operator and BLM to improve 
public health and safety conditions and other conditions such as 
road maintenance in the general area. 

4. Work with BLM to resolve any surface use conflicts which may arise. 



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Work directly with all surface users in the area, including 

operators, regarding maintenance of roads and other support 

facilities, preventing damage to the surface resources, and en- _ 

couraging public health and safety awareness. 

Notify GS of all applications involving lands outside the AO where 
surface use may cause conflicts. Approval of applications will 
be based upon all considerations including recommendations from 
the GS. 



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ABANDONMENT 



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GS will: 



1. Notify BLM of cancellation or termination of any approved plan 
of operations tinder which no activity has taken place. 

2. Send BLM a copy of all notices of intention to abandon. If the 
lease is to remain in effect, any proprietary data contained in 
a notice will be deleted. If that portion of the approved plan 
of operations covering surface rehabilitation does not contain 
information as to whether the well's casing is to be cut off 
below the ground surface or the abandonment marker is to be 
waived, or both, the BLM will be orally contacted for its recom- 
mendations . 

3. Approve the surface and subsurface plugging program to be followed 
by the operator. 

4. Not approve the abandonment of a well where BLM has furnished a 
written declaration of its interest in acquiring that well should 
it encounter useable fresh water, without first supplying BLM 
with the operator's estimated cost of the casing to be left in the 
hole and the opportunity to assume future responsibility for the 
well. GS will provide as much advance notice as is possible but 
it is recognized that in many instances it will be necessary that 
BLM's decision be made within a few hours after notification of 
the proposed abandonment. 

5. As necessary, request that BLM work directly with the operator 
concerning surface rehabilitation. 

6. Approve the subsequent report of abandonment only after a joint 
inspection by BLM and GS confirms that surface rehabilitation 
requirements of the approved plan of operations have been completed 
satisfactorily. 



BLM will: 



Upon being notified of the pending abandonment of a well which 
encountered useable fresh water and being furnished with the 
operator's estimated cost of the casing to be left in the hole, 
make a decision within the time allowed by GS as to whether it 
wants the well and will pay the attendant costs thereof. (See 
item 9, page B-4 ) . 



F - 1 



2. Upon request, advise GS if the well's casing should be cut off 
below ground surface. 

3. Upon request, advise the GS whether the required surface abandon- 
ment marker should be waived. 

4. When requested by GS, work directly with the operator concerning 
surface rehabilitation. 

5. Notify GS of any failure on the part of the operator to undertake 
surface rehabilitation measures which are required by the approved 
plan of operations. 

6. Initiate action to have the operator's surety company perform 

the required rehabilitation if all efforts to secure the operator's 
compliance with the pertinent provisions of the approved plan of 
operations are unsuccessful. 

7. Contact the surface owner where private lands are involved to 
ascertain acceptance of the surface rehabilitation. In no event 
shall the operator be required to perform less surface rehabilitation 
than that required by his prior contract or agreement with the 
private surface owner (See item 7, page B-2). 

8. Notify GS of the operator's satisfactory completion of surface 
rehabilitation . 





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GENERAL 



GS will : 

Coordinate and communicate with lessees and operators and BLM concerning 
area development plans and other information requirements prior to 
submission of drilling applications. 

BLM will : 

If requested by GS, communicate with lessees and operators prior to 
submission of drilling applications to expedite BLM's input concerning 
surface management and rehabilitation requirements. 

BLM and GS will : 

1. Periodically hold joint meetings with lessees, operators, con- 
tractors, and other involved parties to discuss problems, stipula- 
tions working agreements, and other items of common concern. 

2. Meet together periodically at the BLM State Office and GS Area 
Office level to discuss past and future procedures under these 
instructions. Where appropriate, the State Director and Area 
Supervisors may consummate regional cooperative agreements to 
supplement this agreement, subject to approval of such agreement 
by the Washington Offices of the GS and BLM. 

3. Offer suggestions for revision of these procedures to their 
Washington Offices for improving their workability and to reduce 
duplication of effort in conducting these cooperative activitif 



/63 



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APPENDIX I - B 



DRILLING MUD MATERIALS 



/£:£" 



DRILLING MUD MATERIALS 



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FUNCTION 


MATERIALS 


WHY USED 


Lubricants 


Certain oils, graphite powder and soaps. 


To reduce down- 
hole friction. 


Flocculants 


Salt, Kydrated line, Gypsum and Sodium 
Tetraphosphates . 


To increase gel 
strength. Causes 
some solids to 
settle out. 


Filtrate 
Reducers 


Bentonite clays, Sodium. carboxy -methyl 
cellulose (CMC) and pregelatinized 
starch. 


Reduce filter 
loss. Prevent 
"water loss" to 
porous formations I 


Foaming Agents 


Anionic foaming chemicals. 


Causes formation 
water to foam 
helping gas or 
air' drilling to 
continue. 

! 


Lost 

Circulation 


Asphalt Emulsions, Asbestos Fibers, 
Shredded Plastics, Mica Flakes, Nut Hulls, 
Cedar Fibers, Cottonseed Hulls and many 
other materials. 


To stop mud loss 
to porous zones . 


Shale Control 
Inhibitors 


Gypsum, Sodium Silicate, Chrome Ligno- 
sulfates, Lime and salt. 


To stop or pre- 
vent swelling of 
shales or clays. 


Surface Active 
Agents 


. Surfactant Chemicals 


To permit better j 
mixing. Example- 
water and oil. 


Thinners and 
Dispersants 


Quebracho, some Polyphosphates and 
lignitlc materials. 


To prevent too 
high a viscosity, 
improve pump abil- 
ity, better 
solids distribu- 
tion in muds . 


Viscosif iers 


Bentonite, CMC, Attapulgite clays and 
Asbestos Fibers. 


To increase 
fiscosity for 
cuttings removal 
and gel strength. 


Preservatives 


Formaldehyde 


Prevent starch 
mud from fer- 
ment in (?. 



/t>7 



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DRILLING AND MATERIALS ( Cent .) 



FUNCTION 



MATERIALS 



WHY USED 



Cement 
Contamination 



Calcium 
Removers 



Weight 
Materials 



Corrosion 
Inhibitors 



Oil 

Emulsion 



Sodium Bicarbonate 



Caustic Soda, Soda Ash, Certain Poly- 
phosphates (SAPP) and Sodium Bicarbonate. 



Barite, Lead Compounds r . Iron Oxides and 
high specific gravity compounds. 



Hydrated Lime, Amine Salts and 
Dichromate salts. 



Prevents mud 
destruction. 



To prevent mud 
destruction by 
Gypsum or 
Anhydrite. 



To- increase mud 
weight (pounds per 
gallon) to hold 
formation fluids 
in place and 
prevent hole 
caving. 



To prevent 
corrosion of 
drilling equip- 
ment and casing. 



Special Emulsifiers or Soaps. 



To make oil-in- 
water or water-in- 
oil emulsions for 
"oil base" mud. 



Sources : 



American Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors. .. Toolgusher's 
Manual, Section 0. September 1970. 

Gatlin, Carl. ' Petroleum Engineering , "Drilling and Well Completions," 
Chapter 6. Prentice-Hall, Inc. New York. 1960. 



/6tf 



waap**V"ilS* , *^i^***^S^V'W^'^^;"^ «^/>'»lMto, , )#S^1Wtf<ww1P 1 i ( ^^ 'Kfja&W.titiffc 



APPENDIX II 

II-A Notice of Intent to Conduct Oil and Gas Exploration 

Operations, BLM Form 3041-1. 
II-B Section 2, Paragraph (g) of the Federal Oil 'and Gas Lease 

(BLM Form 3120-7), "Protection of Surface, Natural 

Resources and Improvements / 
II-C Surface Disturbance Stipulations, BLM Form 3109-5. 
II-D Examples of Site - Specific Oil and Gas Lease Stipulations, 
II-E Archeological Stipulation to Oil and Gas Leases Issued in 

Oregon. 
II-F U. S. Geological Survey NTL - 2B (proposed) . 
II-G U. S. Geological Survey NTL - 3. 
II-H U. S. Geological Survey NTL-4. 
II-I U. S. Geological Survey NTL-6 (proposed). 
II-J Chapter 632 of the Oregon Administrative Rules, Department 

of Geology and Mineral Industries. 
II-K Special Conditions to Apply to all Deep Well Explorator> 

Drilling in Oregon, Departments of Environmental Quality 

and Geology and Mineral Industries. 



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APPENDIX 1 1 -A 



NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONDUCT 



OIL AND GAS EXPLORATORY OPERATIONS 



(BLM Form 3041-1) 



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Form 30-10- 1 
(November 1970) . 
■ (formerly 3107-1) 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONDUCT OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION OPERATIONS 



Name 



Address (include zip code) 



hereby files this "Notice of Intent to Conduct Oil and Gas Exploration Operations" across and upon (give description 
of lands by township(s) and range) 



The type of_ operation to be pursued is □magnetometer □seismograph | j other (specify) 



ximate date of commencement of operations . Upon completion of 

Vj/the Bureau of Land Management District Manager shall be furnished a "Notice of Completion of Oil and Gas 
Exploration Operations. " 



The undersigned agrees that oil and gas exploration operations 
will be conducted pursuant to the following terms and 
conditions: 

1. Exploration operations shall be conducted in compliance 
with all Fedora!, State and County laws, ordinances or 
regulations which are applicable to the area of operations 
including, but not limited to, those- pertaining to fire, 
sanitation, conservation, water pollution, fish and game. 
All operations hereunder shall be conducted in a prudent 
manner. 

2. Due care will be exercised in protecting lands in this 
notice. Al! necessary precautions shall be taken to avoid 
any damage other than norma! wear and tear, to gates, 
bridges, roads, culverts, cattle guards, fences, dams, 
dykes, vegetative cover and improvements, and stock 
watering and other facilities. 

3. Appropriate procedures shall be taken to protect any 
shafts, pits or tunnels, and shot holes shall be capped 
when not in use to protect the lives, safety, or property of 
other person's or of wildlife and livestock. 

4. All vehicles shall be operated at a reasonable rate of 
speed, and due care must be taken to safeguard all live- 



(Signature) 



(Address including zip code) 



stock and wildlife in the vicinity of his operations. Bull- 
dozers shall not be used without advance notification to 
the District Manager. Existing roads and trails shall be 
used wherever possible; if new roa''*4 and trails are made, 
care should be taken to follow natural contours of the lands 
where feasible and restoration and/or reseeding, as re- 
quested by District Manager shall be made. 

5. Upon expiration, revocation or abanu. ent of open lions 
conducted pursuant to this "Notice," oi equipment shall 
be removed from the land and the land shall I ■ restored as 
nearly as practicable to its original Condi.. . '.,v such 
measures as the District Manager may specify. All geo- 
physical holes must be safely plugged. Upon leaving the 
land, the District Manager shall be informed. 

6. Upon request, the location and depth of water sands en- 
countered shall be disclosed to the District Manager. 

7. The party conducting such operations shall contact the 
District Manager prior to actual entry upon the land in order 
to be apprised of the practices which should be followed 
or avoided in the conduct of his operations in order to 
minimize damages to property of the United States. 



(Signature of Geophysical Operator) 



(Address including zip code) 



GPO 6 3 i - 96 a 



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APPENDIX II-B 

SECTION 2, PARAGRAPH (g) of the FEDERAL 
OIL AND GAS LEASE (BLM Form 5120- 7 ) 



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Section 2, Paragraph (q) of Federal Oil and Gas Lease, —' "Protection 

of Surface, Natural Resurces , and Improvements" 



(q) Protection of surface, natural resources, and im- 
provements. The lessee agrees to take such reason- 
able steps as may be needed to prevent operations on 
the leased lands from unnecessarily: (1) causing or 
contributing to soil erosion or damaging crops, including 
forage, and timber growth thereon on Federal or non- 
Federal lands in the vicinity; (2) polluting air and water; 
(3) damaging improvements owned by the United States' 
or other parties; or (4) destroying, damaging or removing 
fossils, historic or prehistoric ruins, or artifacts; and 
upon any partial or total relinquishment or the cancel- 
lation or expiration of this lease, or at any other time 
thereto when required and to the extent deemed neces- 
sary by the lessor to fill any pits, ditches and other 
excavations, remove or cover all debris, and so far as 
reasonably possible, restore the surface of the leased 
land and access roads to their former condition, includ- 
ing the removal of structures as and if required. The 
lessor may prescribe the steps to be taken and res- 
toration to be made with respect to the leased lands 
and improvements thereon whether or not owned by the 
United States. 



1/ BUI Form 3120-7 



177 



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APPENDIX II-C 



SURFACE DISTURBANCE STIPULATIONS 



(BLM Form 3109-5) 



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UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 

SURFACE DISTURBANCE STIPULATIONS 



Area Oil and Gas Supervisor or 

District Engineer (Address, include zip code) 



Management Agency {name) 



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Address (include zip code) 



1. Notwithstanding any provision of this lease to the 
contrary, any drilling, construction, or other operation 
on the leased lands that will disturb the surface there- 
of or otherwise affect the environment, hereinafter 
called "surface disturbing operation," conducted by 
lessee shall be subject, as set forth in this stipu- 
lation, to prior approval of such operation by the Area 
Oil and Gas Supervisor in consultation with appro- 
priate surface management agency and to such rea- 
P""Hble conditions, not inconsistent with the purposes 

hich this lease is issued, as the Supervisor may 
\^ , i ^ c're to protect the surface of the leased lands and 
the environment. 

2. Prior to entry upon the land or the disturbance of 
the surface thereof for drilling or other purposes, 
lessee shall submit for approval two (2) copies of a 
map and explanation of the nature of the anticipated 
activity and surface disturbance to the District Engi- 
neer or Area Oil and Gas Supervisor, as appropriate, and 
will also furnish the appropriate surface management 
agency named above, with a copy of such map 
and explanation. 



An environmental analysis will be made by the Geo- 
logical Survey in consultation with the appropriate 
surface management agency for the purpose of assuring 
proper protection of the surface, the natural resources, 
the environment, existing improvements, and for 
assuring timely reclamation of disturbed lands. 

3. Upon completion of said environmental analysis, 
the District Engineer or Area Oil and Gas Supervisor, 
as appropriate, shall notify lessee of the conditions, 
if any, to which the proposed surface disturbing 
operations will be subject. 

Said conditions may relate to any of the following: 

(a) Location of drilling or other exploratory or 
developmental operations or the manner in 
which they are to be conducted; 

(b) Types of vehicles that may bu t:sed and areas 
in which they may be used; am' 

(c) Manner or location in which irr rovements 
such a"s roads, buildings, pipelines, oi other 
improvements are to be constructed. 



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Form 310 9-5 (August 1373) 



GPO 84S -2SB 



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APPENDIX II-D 



EXAMPLES of SITE-SPECIFIC 



OIL and GAS LEASE 



STIPULATIONS 



fSS 



Form 3040-4 
(November 1970) 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 

MINERAL LEASING STIPULATIONS 

SURFACE MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS 
FOR EXPLORATION, MINING, AND RECLAMATION 



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Stipulations may be selected from the following list for 
inclusion in permits or leases. Care must be exercised 
to assure that any stipulation used apply specifically to 
the need for such stipulation. .Other stipulations may be 
drafted as needed to meet specific problems. 

1. Activities employing wheeled or tracked vehicles 
shall be conducted in accordance with industry practices 
and in such a manner as to minimize surface damage. 

2. Trail widths shall be kept to the minimum necessary 
and may not exceed feet. Surface may be cleared of 

timber, stumps, and snags. Care must be taken to avoid 
scarring or removal of ground vegetative cover. 

3. Drainage systems shall not be blocked. No cuts or 
fills shall be made near or in streams which will result 
in siiiation or accumulation of debris. All damage to 
streams must be repaired, to the satisfaction of the 
authorized officer. 

4. All operations 'must be conducted so as not to change 

haracter or cause pollution of streams, lakes, ponds, 
noles, seeps, and marshes or cause damage to fish 
ana wildlife resources. 

5. Surface damage which causes soil movement and/or 
water pollution must be corrected to the satisfaction of 
the authorized officer. 

6. Vegetation must not be disturbed within 300 feet of 
any waters designated in a (prospecting permit) (lease) 
(contract) except at authorized stream crossings. 

7. No explosives may be used without prior written 
consent of the authorized officer. 

8. Trails and campsites must be kept clean. All gar- 
bage and foreign debris must be eliminated by removal or 
burial. Burning is permissible only by prior written 
consent of the authorized officer. 

9. Existing roads and trails shall be used when- 
ever possible. 

10. All survey monuments, witness corners, reference 
■ monuments, and bearing trees must be protected against 
destruction, obliteration, or damage. Any damaged or 
obliterated markers must be reestablished in accordance 

with accepted survey practices at expense of (permittee) 
■actor) (lessee). 

Ns^^-The operator shall make every effort to prevent, 
control, or suppress any fire in the operating area. 



Reports of uncontrolled fires must be immediately sent to 
the authorized ofiicer or his representatives. 

12. Fill all holes, pits, and excavations to the extent 
agreed in the approved mining plan and grade to the 
natural contour. 

13. When surface operations are conducted, overburden 
or other waste shall be returned to the excavation, as 
set forth in the mining plan and except in instances 
when the district manager or state director determines 
that it would be desirable to use an excavation for the 
permanent impoundment of water or for other beneficial 
uses. 

14. Disposal sites shall be selected and prepared so as 
to avoid downward percolation of pollutants into aquircrs. 

15. Disposal systems for solid and liquid wastes shall 
be designed and constructed so as to avoid landslides, 
control wind and water erosion, and establish conditions 
conducive to vegetative growth in the disposal area. 

16. Casual accumulations of water on waste piles shall 
be avoided, and, where necessary, surface waters shall 
be directed around the piles. 

17. Final grading of backfilled and other unconsolidated 
materials shall be so performed as to present a surface 
susceptible to vegetation or desired land form. 

18. Excavations used for the permanent impoundment of 
water shall be graded to establish safe access to water 
for persons, livestock, and w'ildlife. 

19. No solid rock face or bench face shall exceed 

feet in height*. Appropriate access suitable for persons, 
lifestock, and wildlife shall be provided for every 
feel of continuous rock or bench face. 

20. Except for solid rock faces, bench faces, and 
excavations used for impoundment of water, those surface 
areas of the leased premises disturbed by operations 
conducted by the lessee shall be revegetated when their 
use is no longer required by the operator. (Species, 
methods, and season of seeding or planting, etc. should 
be specified. These requirements should he practical 
and generally should not require vegetative rehabilitation 
beyond level of production. ) 

21. Backfilling, final grading, and vegetation shall be 
completed within two (2) years after the completion or 
termination of the particular operation involved unless 
the district manager extends the time. 



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?'' Drill holes shall be permanently scaled or filled as 
led by the district manager upon completion of 
^ ...itions. 

23. Surface building, supporting facilities, and other 
structures which are not required for particular operations 
shall be removed and the area graded and revegetated. 

24. All operations shall be conducted with a view to 
avoidance of range and forest fires and spontaneous 
combustion. Open burning of carbonaceous materials 
shall be in accordance with suitable practices for fire 
prevention and contiol. 

25. The lease or contract premises shall be appropri- , 
alely posted and fenced or otherwise protected to 
minimize injury to persons, livestock, and wildlife. 

26. All access, haul, and other support roads and trails 
shall be constructed and maintained in such a manner 
as to control and minimize channeling and other erosion. 
Reads and trails shall be constructed only at locations 
approved by the authorized officer. 



27. All roads constructed in the operation shall be 
closed by barricades or protected from erosion by placing 
of water control bars as required by the district manager. 

28. All existing improvements including, but not limited 
to, fences, gates, cattle guards, roads, trails, culverts, 
pipelines, bridges, public land survey monuments, and 
water development and control structures shall be 
maintained in serviceable condition. Damaged or 
destroyed improvements shall be replaced, restored, or 
appropriately compensated for. 

29. When agreed by lessee and lessor, the lease site 
shall be available for other public uses including, but 
not limited to, livestock, grazing, hunting, fishing, 
camping, hiking, and picnicking. 

30. Topsoil shall be removed and stockpiled prior to 
removal of overburden. Stockpiles shall be located so 
as not to be covered by spoil materials and to facilitate 
their use in final backfilling and grading. 

GPO 631 - 559 



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EXAMPLES OF SITE-SPECIFIC OIL AND GAS LEASE STIPULATIONS 

1. All of the land in this lease is included in (recreation or special. 
area, etc. ) . Therefore, no occupancy or disturbance of the surface 
of the land described in this lease is authorized. The lessee, how- 
ever, may exploit the oil and gas resources in this lease by direc- 
tional drilling from sites outside this lease. If a proposed drilling 
site lies on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management, a 
permit for use of the site must be obtained from the BLM District 
Manager before drilling or other development begins,;. 

2. No access or work trail or road, earth cut or fill, structure or 
other improvement, other than an active drilling rig, will be 
permitted if it can be viewed from the (road, lake, river, etc.). 

3. No occupancy or other activity on the surface of (legal subdivision) 
is allowed under this lease. 

4. No occupancy or other surface disturbance will be allowed within 

feet of the (Road, Trail, River, Creek, Canal, 
etc.). This distance may be reduced when specifically approved in 
writing by the District Engineer, Geological Survey, with the con- 
currence of the District Manager, Bureau of Land Management. 

5. No drilling or storage facilities will be allowed within 

feet of ( live water , the reservoir , etc.) located in (legal subdivi- 
sion) . TKIFdistance may be reduced when specifically approved m 
writing by the District Engineer, Geological Survey, with the con- 
currence of the District Manager, Bureau of Land Management. 

6. No occupanyy or other surface disturbance will be allowed on slopes 
in excess of percent, without written permission from the 
District Engineer, Geological Survey, with the concurrence of the 
District Manager, Bureau of Land Management. 

7. In order to (minimize watershed damage, protect important seasonal 
wildlife habitat , etc.) exploration, drilling, and other develop- 
ment activity will be allowed only during the period from 

to . This limitation does not apply to 

maintenance and operation of producing wells. Exceptions to this 
limitation in any year may be specifically authorized in writing 
by the District Engineer, Geological Survey, with the concurrence 
of the District Manager, Bureau of Land Management. 

8. In order to minimize watershed damage, during muddy and/or wet 
periods the District Manager, Bureau of Land Management, through 
the District Engineer, Geological Survey, may prohibit exploration, 
drilling or other development. This limitation does not apply 

to maintenance and operation of producing wells . 



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9» The (Trail/Road) will not be used as an access 

road tor activities on this lease. 

10. To maintain esthetic values, all semi -permanent and permanent 
facilities will be painted or camouflaged to blend with the 
natural surroundings. The paint selection or method of camou- 
flage will be subject to approval by the District Engineer, 
Geological Survey, with the concurrence of the District Manager, 
Bureau of Land Management. 



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APPENDIX II-E 



ARCHEOLOGICAL STIPULATION 



To OIL and GAS LEASES 



ISSUED IN OREGON 



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CULTURAL RESOURCE STIPULATIONS TO 
OIL AND GAS LEASES 
ISSUED IN OREGON 



Prior to any operations under this lease, the Lessee will engage a 
qualified professional, acceptable to the Authorized Officer, to make 
a survey of the land to be disturbed or occupied. A certified statement, 
signed by the qualified professional, setting out the steps taken in 
the survey and the findings thereof as to the existence of antiquites 
or other objects of historic or scientific interest, shall be submitted 
to the Authorized Officer. If the statement indicates the existence 
J| of such materials which might be disturbed by operations under this lease, 
the Lessee shall take such mitigating actions as may be required by the 
Authorized Officer, including, but not limited to, archeological salvage 
or protective measures or avoidance of the site, to protect and preserve 
. such objects. Such objects shall remain the property of the Lessor, or 
the surface owner if other than the Lessor. 

If a cultural resource is discovered during project operations, acti- 
vities will be stopped until a survey of the materials is completed ly 
a professional engaged by the lessee and acceptable to the Authorized 
Officer, including but not limited to archeological salvage or protective 
measures or avoidance of the site, to protect and preserve the materials. 
Such materials shall remain the property of the Lessor, or the surface 
owner if other than the Lessor. 



191 



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APPENDIX II-F 



U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 



NTL - 2B 



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JUSTICE DEPARTMENT 

Law Enforcement Assistance 
Administration 

"NAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON 
Aimi JUSTICE STAWDAROS AND 
,iLS, PRIVATE TASK FORCE 

Mooting 

Notice Is hereby given of a correction 
In the location of a meeting previously 
announced in the Federal liitr.isxsR. 

An ad hoc working committee of tlic 
Private Security Task force to the 
National Advisory Committee on Crimi- 
nal Justice Standards and Goals is 
scheduled to meet Friday and Saturday, 
August 22 and 23, 1075, in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, The meeting is' still 
scheduled to convene at B:GQ a.m. Friday 
August 22, In the East Conference. Room, 
12th Floor, I.N. A. Building, at 1S0Q Arch 
Street. The location of Saturday's por- 
tion of the meeting has been changed to 
the Citizens' Crime Commission Office, 
12 South 12th Street, alao in Philadel- 
phia, 

Discussion at this meeting will focus 
Upon the area ol private security per- 
sonnel training and education, The 
meeting will be open to the public. 

For further information, please con- 
tact: Mr. William T. Archey, Director, 
Policy Analysis Division, OfBce of Plan- 
ning end Management, LEAA, U.S. De- 
partment of Justice, 633 Indiana Avenue, 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20531. 202/370- 
8762. 

Gerald H. Yastada, 
Attorney' Advisor, 
Office of General Counsel. 

"'00.75-31462 Filed 8-14-75:8:46 a-mj 

irtelient of the interior 

BUREAU OP LAK0 MANAGEMENT 

OUTEf! CONTIHEKTAL SBEIF OFFSHORE, 
SOUTHERN CAUrOHNSA 

AvsfisbHIty of FtneJ Fnvironrnatttal impact 
Statement Regarding Proposed Oil end 

Gas Lease Saio 

Pursuant to section 103(2) (C) of the 
National Environmental Policy Act of 
1058, the Department of the Interior bna 
prepared a- final environmental impact 
statement relating to a proposed Cuter 
Continental Shelf tOCS) general oli and 
gas lease sale of 207 Iraewcf submersed 
lands on the OC3 offshore southern 
California. 

The final environmental impact state- 
ment has been submitted to tire Council 
on Environmental Quality and made 
available to government agencies and the 
public for review for a 30-day period 
from the date of availability, During this 
period, comments on any aspect of the 
final statement will be. accepted and con- 
sidered by the Department of the In- 
terior. This comment period will overlap 
In part with the 00-day comment period 
for the OCS Programmatic FEI3. This is 
the last of three commenting periods 
provided by the Department of the In- 
terior in Use review of a sltc-.Nlierlflc en- 
v^-'irrienUil Impact statement for this 



proposed lease sale. The first two com- 
menting periods were announced In the 
Federal Register editions of February 
21, 1975 (40 F.R. 7092) (site-specific 
D: ; :iS comment period from February 21 
through May 23, 1975) and April 8, 1975 
(40 Fit. 15.117-159181 (comments on 
site-specific DEIS, and FEIS when issued, 
during 60-day COS Programmatic FEIS 
comment period which commenced on 
July 11 and will extend through Septem- 
ber 9, 1075). 

Single copier, of the final environ- 
mental statement can he obtained from 
the Office of fchu Manager, Pacific Outer 
Continental Shelf Office, Bureau of Land 
Management, 7603 Federal Building, 300 
North Los Angeles Street. Los Angeles, 
California 90012, and from the Office of 
Public Affairs, Bureau of Lund Manage- 
ment (1301. Washington. DC. 20240. 

Copies of the linal environmental 
statement will also be available for re- 
view In the main public libraries in vari- 
ous coastal cities in the sale area. 

Curt Bskklund, 

Director, 
Bureau of lAind Management, 

Approved : 
Stanley D. Doremvs, 

Deputy Assistant Secretary 
of the Interior. 

August 1, 1975. 

I PR Doc.76-21053 Piled 8-14-7fi;R;48 i»m) 

Geological Survey 
DISPOSAL OF PRODUCED WATER 
Comments 



On May 13, 1375, the Geological Sur- 
vey published in the Federal Register 
(Vol. 40, No. 93. pp. 20834-20835) , a 
Notice which <l> suspended the per- 
formance dates prescribed iri NTL-2 and 
NTL-2A; (2) advised of the Intent to 
modify and combine the requirements 
of osid Notices into a new KTL; and, <3) 
invited the submittal of written com- 
ments in that regard by July 15, 1975. 
• Written and oral comments received 
by the Geological Survey have been care- 
fully considered in the preparation of a 
proposed new Notice. All written com- 
ments arc on file with the Geological 
Survey. Certain of these comments have 
been p.dopted or essentially satisfied, and 
the Geological Survey has made other 
changes on its own motion. The principal 
changes are discussed below: 

FORMAT. The format has been 
Changed to Incorporate all requirements 
ft. the disposal of produced water into 
r Mle Notice. 

•ROVAL AUTHORITY. Approval 

applications and compliance en- 

. :nt has been made the responsi- 

of the District Engineer. 

LIGATIONS. The information to 

!;.., icmitted with the application for 

m; .will of each l.\>e disposal system 

ha . ;:een specified. 

DISPOSAL IN UN LINED PITS. The 
criteria under which the disposal of pro- 
duced water In untitled pits will he per- 
mitted litis been clarified. 



TIME FOR COMPLIANCE. The com- 
pliance date has been extended to Octo- 
ber 1, 1977. 

Due to the number of changes in both 
format and content, the Geological 
Survey is soliciting written comments, 
suggestions, and objections concerning 
the requirements of the proposed Notice. 
Such comments arc to be submitted to 
tho Chief, Conservation Division, U.S. 
Geological Survey, Mall Stop 650, 12201 
Sunrise Valley Drive, .Res ton, Virginia 
22092, by September 12, 1975. 

It is hereby certified that the economic 
and inflationary impacts of proposed 
Notice to lessees and Operators, NTL- 
2B, have been carefully evaluated In ac~. 
eordanee with OMB Circular A-107. 

V. F. McKelvey. 

Direclnr. 



[NTL-2B] 

Disposal of Produced V/assr 

notice to lessees an!) operators of 
federal and indian oil and gas leas3s 

This Notice supersedes NTL-2 and 
2A dated , and March 1, 1875, re- 
spectively, and is Issued pursuant to the 
authority prescribed in 30 CFR 221/. and 
221.32. 

Lessees and operators of onshore Fed- 
eral and Indian oil and gas leases or fee 
and State leases committed to federally- 
supervised unitized or corcmuniticed 
areas shall comply with the following 
requirements for the handling, storing, or 
disposing of water produced from oil 
and gas weiis on such leases. 

I. Disposal Requirements and Applica- 
tions for Approval of Disposal Methods 

By October 1, 1977, all produced water 
must be disposed of by (1) injection into 
the subsurface; (2) lined pits; or <3) 
by other acceptable methods. All such 
disposal methods must be approved in 
writing by tiro District Engineer. Any 
method of disposal which has not been 
approved as of Octeher 1, 1977, will be 
considered as an incident of noncom- 
pliance and will be ground? for issuing a 
shut-in order until an acceptable man- 
ner of disposing of said water la pro- 
vided and approved by the District 
Engineer. 

No additional approval is required for 
facilities previously approved by the Geo- 
logical Survey which involve the disposal 
of produced water into the subsurface or 
in lined surface pits. Likewise, no further 
approval is necessary for existing injec- 
tion iacilities utilized for pressure main- 
tenance or secondary recovery opera- 
tions. 

Lessees and operators who are pres- 
ently disposing of water in unlined sur- 
face pits must timely file applications 
with the District Engineer for approval 
ol present or. proposed disposal methods. 



FEDERAL REGISTER, VOL. 40, NO I S9 — HUDAlf, AUGUST J 5, 1975 



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Likewise, lessees and opKi'iilul'-s who are 
presently disposing of produced water in 
the KUbsurir.ce or in lined surface pits 
'■ "hout approval of the Geological Sur- 
nust also file application!) for np- 
1 thereof by the District Engineer. 
s — ^. a minimum, .such applications must 
specify the met hod of disposal and pro- 
vide Information concerning tiie quan- 
tity, quality, and source of the produced 
water, I.e., the daily average volume and 
a water analysis which includes total dis- 
solved solids, Ph, and the concentration 
of chloride;, and sulphates. Additional 
information may be required by the Dis- 
trict Engineer. 

A. Disposal in the Subsurface 

If approval is requested for subsurface 
disposal, the lessee or operator must also 
furnish information with respect to: 

1. The injection formation and inter- 
val. 

2. The quality of the fluid'; in the In- 
jection Interval, i.e., total dissolved solids. 

3. The K'za, weight, grade, and casing 
point of all casing strings, the tiza hole 
drilled to accommodate each string, the 
amount and type of cement ussd in ce- 
menting: the separate string and the 
top of th© cement behind each string. 

4. The total ana plugged back depth 
of the well. 

6. The present or proposed method of 
completing the well for injection, includ- 
ing the ty::s! and size of tubing and 
packer to ■ utilized, the setting depth 
of the p;.-.teer, anticipated injection 
pressure, and Information concsming 
n»v eonwitm inhibitor fluid which fa to 
c-z& ta Hie tubing-casing snnulus. 
, zns for monitoring the system to 

*S^^ ^ na *' 'hjsction ^ confined to the 
injection interval. 

In order to be unproved, subsurface 
disposal must be confined to formations 
which cotitein connate water of similar 
or poorer Quality than the injected water. 
In ccnoral, it will be required (hat sub- 
surface disposal be accomplished through 
tubing utilizing ft packer which is de- 
signed to hold pressure from above and 
below. The pa ok?r should be set at a 
depth where the casing is protected by 
competent cement but usually not more 
than 50 feet above the injection interval. 
Other procedures or methcojs of sub- 
surface dlspp.Mil may be approved by the 
District engineer when justified by the 
lessee or operator. 

B. Disposal in Li?ied Pits 

Where approval Is requested for .sur- 
face disposiii in r» lined pit, the lessee or 
operator must also supply information 
with reapoct to : 

1. Size and location or pit. 

2. Evaporation rate for the area com- 
pensated .for annual rainfall. 

3. Method (or periodic cfisiKWttl of pre- 
cipitated BO.'icR 

4. Type of material to be used for lin- 
ing the pit and the method of installa- 
tion. 

5. Method to be employed for the de- 
tection ut leaks. 

The material used in lining pll« must 
1 -ervtous, weather-resistant, and not 



.subject to deterioration when contacted 
by hydrocarbons, aqueous acids, alkalis, 
fungi, or other substances likely to he 
contained In the produced water. Lined 
pits constructed after the issuance of this 
Notice must have an underlying gravel- 
filled sump and lateral system or other 
suitable devices for the detection of leaks. 
The District Engineer shall be provided 
an opportunity to inspect the leak detec- 
tion system prior to the, installation of 
the pit liner. 

C. Disposal in Unltncd Pits 

Surface disposal into unlined pits will 
not be approved unless the lessee or oper- 
ator can show by application that such 
disposal meets any of the following 
criteria : 

1. The water to be disposed of does not 
contain more than 3,000 ppm of total dis- 
solved solids on an annua,! weighted av- 
erage basis, provided that such water does 
not contain objectionable or toxic levels 
of any constituent. 

2. The volume of water to be disposed 
of per facility does not. exceed five barrels 
per day or the quantity of dissolved solids 
does not exceed 600 pounds on a monthly 
basis, whichever is greater. 

For the purpose of determining' the 
total dissolved solids in produced water, 
the Geological Survey will use the fol- 
lowing formula: 

Pounds / Month =■•■ Parts / Million (PPM ) 
x .05035 x Barrels/Month 

3. That all, or a substantial part, of the 
produced water is bailiff used for bene- 
ficial purposes. For example, produced 
water ussd for irrigation, livestock-, or 
wildlife watering shaii be considered aa 
being beneficially used. 

4. The specific method of dtoMMl has 
been granted & surface discharged per- 
mit under the National Pollutant Dis- 
charge Elimination Oystem (NPDSS). 

5. The water to ha disposed of is not of 
poorer Quality than the surface and sub- 
surface water in the area which reason- 
ably mittht be affected by such disposal. 

Applications for approval of unlined 
surjr.ee pits must include the following 
additional Information : 

i. Diss and location of the pit 

2. flvaporation rate for the area com- 
pensated for annua? rainfall. 

3. Percolation rate. 

4. Where beneficial uae is the basis for ■ 
the application, written confirmation 
from the ussrfo) . The water analysis sub- 
mitted must also includo the oil and 
grease content, temperature, chemical 
oxygen demand, and the concentration 
of other constituents which are toxic to 
animal, plant, or aquatic life. 

5. If disposal is pursuant to an NPDES 
permit, n copy of Use approved i>crmlt 
and the most recent "Discharge Monitor- 
lnc Report," 

(I. Where an assertion if; made that 
surface and subsurface fresh waters will 
not be affected by disposal in an unlined 
pit, the Justification must include: 

a, Analyses of all surface tuid subsur- 
face waters in the area which might rea- 
sonably be affected by the proposed dis- 
posal. . ■„ . 



I). Maps or plats showing the locution 
of surface waters, fresh water wells, and 
existing water disposal facilities within 
two miles of the proposed disposal facil- 
ity. 

c. Reasonable ReoIoKic and hydroloslc 
evidence showing that the proposed dis- 
posal method will not adversely impact 
on existing water quality or major uses 
of such waters, the depth of the shsJlow- 
est frfish water aquifer in the area, and 
the presence of any impermeable bar- 
rier's), 

II. General Requirements for Permanent 
Surface Pits 

Lined and unlined pita approved for 
water disposal shall: 

1. Have adequate storage capacity to 
safely contain all produced wa»er ?.«m in 
those months when evaporation mis). mid 
at a minimum, 

2. Bo constructed, maintained, and op- 
erated to prevent unautftorisad, surface 
discharges of water. .Unless surface, dis- 
charge is authorized, 'no siphon, except 
between pits, will be permitted. 

3. Be fenced, when necessary, to pre- 
vent livestock or wildlife entry to the pit, 

4. Be kept free from surface eecumuift- 
tlons of liquid hydrocarbons by use of 
approved skimmer pita, seirfeln® tests, 
or other suitable equipment. 

5. Have a continuous embankment sur- 
rounding the pit to prevent entrance of 
surface water. 

III. Temporary Use of Surface Pits 

Unlined surface pits may bs used for 
handling or storage of fluids used in drill- 
ing, redriUing, reworking, despening, or 
plugging of a well provided that, such 
facilities are promptly emptied and re- 
stored upon completion of the ciJe*a&»B«. 
Unless otherwise specified by fee Dis- 
trict Enijine-jr, unlined pffcs may to essd 
for well evaluation purposes tea a period 
of 30 days. 

Unlined pits may also be retained as ■ 
temporary containment ■■ its for use only 
in an emergency provide*, .tich pits have 
been approved by the EC et Engineer. 
Any emergency use of su j is skaM be 
reported to the D-'strict Er., , :.es m 6SOS" 
as possible and the pit sfaiw s esnplJed 
and the liquids disposed o& in ',%. ■*$iti*m%& 
manner witfcin 48 hours foikrai i> ^ra. 
unless such time is extended '®$ &L 
trict Engineer - . 

IV. Disposal Facilities for Nap WeUa . 

With the approval of the District Sn- 
ginesr, produced v/ater from wells com- 
pleted after the issuance dates of this No- 
tice may be temporarily disposed of into 
unlined pits for a period of SO days. Dur- 
ing this period, an application for ap- 
proval of tlie permanent disposal method 
alonic Willi all required water analysts 
and other Information must be submit- 
ted for the District Engineer's approval. 
Failure to timely file an application with- 
in the time allowed will be considered an 
incident of noncompliance and will be 
Rrounds for Issuing a shut-in order until 
the application is submitted. Disposal 
may .be continued pending the District 






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fHOSHAL, REGISTER, VOL. ^0, NO. 159 — FHIOAV, AUGUST 15, 197i 



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NOTICES 



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^lnesr'e determination. Once the Dis- 
trict Engineer has determined the proper 
method of disposal, the Icaree or operator 
ve until October i, 3077, or CO days 
ig- receipt of the District Einl- 
Vv'dcifsrminstfci, whichever is ti:o 
lorSer, in which to make any changes 
necessary to brfns the disposal method 
tnto compliance. 

V. Unamiicktble Delay 
A Single extension of time not to exceed 
Brree months may be granted by Ujs Dis- 
frfert Engineer where the- lessee or op- 
enter conclusively shows by application 
that, deepite the cgterefce of due care and 
dSSgertce, he has been unable to timely 
»raply with the requirements of thta 
Kotice, provided that such- delay will not 
edroreely affect the environment, 

W. Reports 

AH unSBttwized discharges or spills 
irosn CkpD".-tA facilities s:aus4 ba reported 
to itoe District Engineer in accordance 
with the provision* of WTL-3, 

An aantieJ report lor each facility 
ehkrh tez&atien the total volutna s'is- 
p-xed of dnri'M the reverting period end 
e aarreafi waits* uaajya'a which provide 
feesama iy[;s of. information required tor 
aps»rovr4 cs the origtnei Kpshcatkra, 

Til. CtmpUame 
Compliance -with this Notice does not 
relieve rs terns ox op^at-ar of the rr>- 
epB-iiibiiiSy ■ ? comply!*!* with tnnro 
sfcrtarent &;,-. '.cable Federal or State 
arstsr ftii&^ty laws or regulations or with 
ether written aiders of the Geological 



34-12 



rs 



Area 041 and Gas SupcrvS.tor. 
APPROVED: Rtjssbll o. Watohto, 

CfeJe/, Conservation Division. 

{SE PB3.1B-SU7E M.I«J &-!.4-75;8;46 tmj 



fSOTHETi^At RESOURCES CPERATIONAf 
(CftO) C-RQEfi f?0, 4 

Cerstref and Western PJsgtans 

Notice is hereby riven th&t pursuant Jo 
t$CFH 370.3, the Chief, Conservation BJ- 
TteSsn, U.S> Gsotetfca) iiurrey, has ap- 
peared GRO Gvtier No. 4 for the Central 
tad Western JtegScns. 

The purpoaa of GRO Oritur No. 4 fas to 
provide General Environmental Protec- 
tion Requirraenta for geothermaJ re- 
sources operations in the Central and 
Western Regions. 

The proposed Order was published In 
the Feulkal Rbgi.stesj on January 38 
1975, (Vol. 49, Wo. 19, pages 416S-41C3),' 
with a felicitation for eomment/t. AH 
comments on the proposed Order Were 
jorrsidored in preparing the final version 
ef GTiO Order No. 4. In addition, the 
OeclogJcsl &irrvey, on its own motion, 
hM revised some serttona of the proposed 
Order to Strengthen and clarify it. " 

Significant modifications made In the 
draft Order and the rationale for them 



The Introduction has been emended to 
reflect recent changes in the Freedom of 
Information Act <P.L. 80-487, m amended 
hy P.L. 03-502), with respect to treat- 
ment of proprietary data submitted under 
this Order and to clarify the necessary 
acquisition of environmental baseline 
date one year prior to submission of a 
plan for production as required by 30 
CFK 270.34(Ic). 

Paragraph 2, land USE and REC- 
LAMATION, has been amended to con- 
sider vehicular traffic in environmentally 
fracils areas and temporary fencing, as 
needed, to facilitate re vegetation in re- 
claimed areas. 

Paragraph 4, RECREATION, has been 
emended to provide for the relocation of 
recreation sites and/or access routes 
thereto where such relocation is approved 
by the Supervisor with the concurrence 
of the Authorized oacer. 

Paragraph 6, SLOPE STABILITY AND 
EROSION CONTROL, has been broad- 
ened to ensure that sites for wells and 
surface facilities in potentially unstable 
areas are designed by and constructed 
under the supervision of a Qualified en- 
gineer or engineering geologist. 

Paragraph si, BIOTA, has been exten- 
sively revised end clarified v/itte respect 
to soliciting expert advice and assistance 
from other Government P-fenclss or pri- 
vate groups to detect adverse flora! and 
faunal trends und to provide realistic 
mitigating measure*, a soc^nn fcr>a been 
added which reetuirea reasonable replace- 
ment of species or their habitat which' ere 
sifrniilcantly dssmagrod by . a lessee's 
operations. " . 

Paragraph S, SUBSIDENCE AND 
SEISBOTCIxy, h!:s been broadened to in- 
clude sclsmicHy. The Introduction has 
been reworded for clarification of sur- 
veying and data required. 

Subparagraph SB, BENCH MARKS, 
has been modified to include periodic re- 
surveying of bench marks as necewary. 
Subparagraph fc'L), BEISMICITY, has 
been retiUcd and modified to require 
monitoring and remedial actions where 
production or Injection results in Induced 
xeisrniclty. 

SubjwrnRraph 8A di. liquid dis- 
posal, has beers modified to allow liquid 
wiwte dispoaal by means otiier than In- 
fection if all applicable water quality 
stsndards are met. 

Subparagraph 9A (3) has been retitlorf 
AIR QUALITY, ■ ' rc " UWJ 

Subparagraph 8A t4), pits and 
SUMPS, has been reworded for clarifi- 
cation, and hs.1 been modified to require 
fencing of unattended pits and sumps 
when necessary to protect wildlife, live- 
stock, and the public. 

Subparagraph 9B r2>, POLLUTION 
REPORTS, ha,s been changed to elimi- 
nate distinction between "minor" and 
"substantial'' spills, and now requires a 
uniform reporting procedure for ail pol- 
lution Incidents. 

Subparagraph t-c (I), plan of in- 
jection, has been modified to eliminate 
the requirement that a lessee furnish a 
copy of his plan of injection to adjacent 
lessees. «' •" - 



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Subparagraph 9C (3), INSPECTION, 
has been expanded to require the imme- 
diate cessation of injection operations in 
the event of an injection well failure 
which may damage surface or fresh 
water aquifers. 

Paragraph 10, WATER QUALITY, has 
been clarified regarding water analysis 
requirements and to provide for a sus- 
pension of a production where a health 
liazard exists. 

Subparagraph 1 1C, NOISK CTtrTEPT A 
has been clarified with respect to the' 
conditions under which a noise level of 
65dB(A) may be exceeded.--.. ". • 

it is hereby certified' that the economic 
and Inflationary impacts of G«othcrmal 
Resources Operational Order No 4~hav? 
teen carefully evaluated in accordance 
with OMB Circular A-107. 

V. E. McKzLvrt, 

uniteu st4te3 dspabtmsaft op tt.s 

Interior 

csiotoaicAL survey coRBEavasiOB Br.«ja.<osr 

Gaothermal Resources Opemtkmet 
Order No. 4 

Effective August 1, 197S 

General Environmental Frotectfon 

Requirements 
This Order is established pyx 



, ..it to 
me authority prescribed in 30 c>'Xi ?.70.n 
and in accordance with 30 C ; ""i 170.2 
270.34(k). 270.37, 270.41, 270.42. fnO/V 
S70.44, and £70.73. Lessees Er;,=ul ftCBOSly 
with the provialons of this Qvdar. All 
variances frosa the requUrera&n^- R^ci- 
fiad in this Order shall be fcu-iis-srt- -to aj>- ' 
provpi pursuant to 30 CFB 'S70.43. Rg&* 
erencea in this Order to aupswiMa. da- 
terminations, or requirements Me to 
those given or saade by Use Area Q-eo- 
Uiermal Supervisor (Supervisor > or his 
delegated representative. 

All data submitted under this Qrc'rr 
shall be available for inspection, in ba- 
cordance with the Freedom of lijibwaia,- 
tioa Act of 1008 tt>J. 4 C«MW?), &s 
wacndett in 1S74 (PJU 8S-6aa). except 
inibraaation euah as geaioirisvtl, zw- 
p).iyeicai, reasrvoir, trade twrtis, imi ;l- 
naBciai data and interpretations ci euah 
dp-ta, maps,, and related nUes for sbieh a 
lessee requests pro.tyir.taxy rtatua, pro- 
vided that such stetuji is determined bv 
the Supervisor to be warranted and is 
approved by appropriate officials of the 
Department of the interior. 

Protection of the environment includes 
the lessee's responsibility to: conduct ex- 
ploration and development operations in 
a manner that provides maximum pro- 
tection, of the environment; rehabilitate 
disturbed binds; take all necessary pre- 
cautions to protect the public health arid 
safety; and conduct operations in ac- 
cordance with the spirit and objective 1 ! of 
all applicable Federal environmental leg- 
islation and supporting executive orders. 
Adverse environmental Impacts from 
geothermal-related activity shall be pre- 
vented or mitigated through enforcement 
of applicable Federal, State, and local 
standard*, and the application of exist- 



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FEDERAL RFGiSTEe, VOL. 40, NO. 1 5V-. f PJDAL AUGUST 15, 1975 

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APPENDIX II-G 

U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 
NTL - 3 



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October 21, 1974 
December 31, 1974 Revision 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
CONSERVATION DIVISION 
PACIFIC AREA 



NOTICE TO LESSEES AND OPERATORS OF PUBLIC DOMAIN 
ACQUIRED AND INDIAN OIL AND GAS LEASES 
(NTL-3) 



This notice is issued pursuant to the authority prescribed in 
30 CFR 221.7 which provides as follows: 

"The supervisor shall prescribe the manner and form in 
which records of all operations, reports, and notices 
shall be made by lessees and operators." 

Operators shall comply with the following reporting requirements: 
POLLUTION RE PORTS 

The following incidents, when occurring on the subject leases, shall 
be reported to the appropriate District Engineer as soon as practical 
but within a maximum of IS hours: 

1. All surface discharges of pollutants (oil, saltwater, and 
other liquid, or combination thereof) in excess of 10 barrels; 

2. All surface discharges of pollutants, regardless of size, 
which have entered or threaten to enter freshwater streams, 
lakes, ponds, navigable waters, or that occur in environ- 
mentally sensitive areas; 

3. All blowouts (loss of control of any well); 

1 1 

4. All accidents involving life-threatening injuries or loss 
of life; 

5. All fires or explosions which cause damage -to property, 
equipment, loss of oil or gas, or result in injuries to 
personnel; and 

6. All subsurface loss of production, or other contamination 
or pollution. 

WRITTEN REPORTS 



A written report shall be submitted in triplicate to the District Office 
no later than fifteen (15) days following the control or containment of 
any of the above incidents. Such reports shall provide information on: 



1. The specific nature and cause of the incident; 

2. The location where the incident occurred; 

3. A description of the resultant damage and estimated volume of 
pollutant discharged; 

4. The date and time of occurrence; 

5. The length of time required to control the incident or contain 
the pollutants; 

6. Actions that have been or will be taken to prevent recurrence 
of said incident; 

7. Measures being taken to clean up pollutants; 

8. The make or manufacturer, size, working and test pressure, date 
of installation, type of use, physical damage, etc. of any equip- 
ment causing or indirectly involved with the incident; and 

9. Other Federal or State agencies notified of incident. 

Spills of pollutants involving less than 10 barrels which have been con- 
tained and cleaned up without entering a freshwater stream, lake, or pond 
can be reported in writing without immediate verbal notification. Accidents 
not involving injury or loss of life may be reported in a similar manner. 
A sample reporting form is attached to this notice. 

CONTING ENCY PLANS 

A copy of any Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Plan (SPCC Plan) 
required by the (Federal) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under Part 
112 of 40 CFR or ether contingency plan must be submitted upon request, t 
the appropriate District Engineer. 




December 31, 1974 
F. J. Schambeck Date 

Oil and Gas Supervisor 
Pacific Area 



Attached are a plat(s) and data showing District boundaries, office loca- 
tions, addresses, and telephone numbers of District engineering personnel, 
(NOTE: Data to be compiled and attached by Area personnel.) 



2 
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■ Attachment No. 1 

n (Submit in triplicate) 

I To: District Iinginccr 
U. S. Geological Survey 
309 Federal Building 

1800 Truxton Avenue 
Bakcrsficld, California 93301 




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From: 

Subject: Pollution Report 

Fire or 
Spill Discharge Blowout Accident Explosion 



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1. Specific Natu re and Cause of Incident 



2. Location of Incident 



3= Description of R esultan t Damage and Volume of Pollutant Discharged 



4. Date and Time of Occurrence 



5o Le ngth of Time Required to Contro l Incident or Contain Pollutants 
6. Action Taken to Prevent Recurrence 



^" Jfe a$urcs T aken to_ CJ ean_Up Pollutants 



203 



8. The make or manufacturer, size, working; and test pr e ssures , date of 
installation, type of use, physical damage, etc., of any equipment 
causing or directly involved with the incident 



9. Other Federal or State Agencies Notified of Incident 



Signature ^ _ ' ' ' Date_ 

Title 



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Attachment No. 2 



PACIFIC AREA 



Bakersfield District Office: 



U. S. Geological Survey 
309 Federal Building 
800 Truxton Avenue 
Bakersfield, California 93301 

Phone: 805-861-4.186 

Donald F, Russell, District Engineer 
Home Phone: 805-871-4620 

John P. Wagner, Assistant District Engineer 
Home Phone: 805-872-2240 



The Bakersfield District includes the states of Arizona, California, Idaho, 
Nevada, Oregon and Washington. 



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APPENDIX II-H 

U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 
NTL-4 



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UNITED STATES DC PART? HINT OF Tl IE INTERIOR 
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 
CONSERVATION' DIVISION 
ONSHORE OIL AND GAS OPERATIONS 
PACIFIC AREA 



November 15, 1974 



NOTICE TO LESSEES AND OPERAT ORS OF FEDERAL 
ONSHORE" 01 L AN lT GAS LEASES 
(NTL-41 

Royalty Pa ym ent on Oil and Gas Lost 

This Notice supersedes the Notice issued July 25, 1974 concerning the 
payment of royalties on oil and gas lost. 



Attached are copies of memorandums dated May 17 and May 30, 1974, from 
the Office of the Solicitor, Department of the Inter: 
payment of royalties on oil and' gas lost. 



*ior, concerning the 



Effective December 1, 1974, royalty or other compensation will be due 
on the value of all oil and gas which is produced pursuant to or for the 
benefit of all onshore Federal oil and gas leases except that gas pro- 
duction specifically exempted by section 3 of , this Notice. Onshore 
Federal leases subject to this Notice are those which arc now in effect 
^^ and those subsequently issued pursuant to 'the Mineral Leasing Act of 

February 25, 1920, as amended and supplemented (30 U.S.C. 131-263) (except 
those previously issued pursuant to sections 18 or 19 thereof) the "" 
Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of August 7, 1947 (30 U S C 351- 
359), and the implied authority of the Executive Branch as defined in the 
Attorney General's Opinion of April 2, 1941- (Vol. 40 Op. Atty. Gen. 41). 

Oil production subject to royalty shall include (1) that oil which is 
produced and sold either on a lease basis or that which is allocated' to 
a lease under the terms of an approved communication or unitization 
agreement; (2) that oil which is used on a lease, communitized tract 
or unitized area for production purposes; (3) that oil which is lost'in 
well tests, spills, blowouts, and fires which occur on a lease, communitized 
tract or unitized area; and, (4) that oil which is unavoidab' 
wise lost on a lease, communitized tract, or unitized area. 

Gas production subject to royalty shall include (1) that gas (both 
dry and casing-head) which is produced and sold either on 'a lease basis 
or that wnich is allocated to a lease under the terms of an annroved ' 
^unitization or unitization agreement; (2) that gas which is vented 

coiunlti^ r U , tCStS ««"-****' completion, or production on a lease, 
* UU C "«' or unitized area; and, (3) that gas which is otherwise 

^ :ir a le ^ e> rr nitized tract > ° r - m - d — ^7 

prior hntten authorization of the Area Oil and Gas Supervisor (Supervisor) 



y or other- 



tjyS. 



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Where gas (both dry and casing-head) is lost (1) because of line breaks, 
equipment malfunctions, blowouts, and fires that occur on a lease, 
comniunitizcd tract or unitized area due to negligence, failure to take 
reasonable precautions, or as a result of the violation of lease terms, 
applicable regulations, provisions of the approved operating plan, or 
the written orders of the Supervisor; or, (2) as a result of the venting 
or flaring of gas through well tests, or otherwise, on a lease, comnun i t i zed 
tract, or unitized area without the prior approval of the Supervisor, shall 
not be considered unavoidably lost and the compensation due the United 
States will be the full value, or allocated portion thereof, of the gas so 
wasted. 

The volume of oil and gas lost and the amount of royalty or compensation 
accruing to the United States as a result of these losses shall be reported 
monthly on Lessee's Monthly Report of Sales and Royalty, Form 9-361. Pay- 
ment of royalty or compensation shall be made on these volumes of oil and 
gas subject to the determination by the Supervisor that such royalty or 
compensation values are properly calculated pursuant to 30 CFR 221.12 and 
30 CFR 221.35. 

The Supervisor may require additional measurement equipment at any production 
facility where lie considers present methods to be inadequate to satisfy the 
purposes of this Notice. 

The operator shall comply with the following specific requirements: 

1. Volume Determination 

A. Oil or G as Lost Af ter Measurement 

When the amount of oil or gas lost has been measured pursuant • 
to 30 CFR 221.43 or 221.44, that measurement shall be the 
basis for the volume determination. 

B. Oil or Ga s host Prior to Measu rement 

The volume of oil or gas lost prior to measurement shall be 
determined as follows: 

(1) Emergencies. During emergency situations, the volume 

of oil or gas lost shall be estimated by comparison with 
the last measured throughput from the production 
facilities on the lease, communitized tract, or unitized 
area where the loss occurs considering such factors as 
the duration of the emergency, individual well tests, 
daily lease production rates, historical production data, 
or by such other methods as may be approved by the 
Supervisor. 

( 2 5 .Well Purging and Evaluati on Test s. The results of 
previous production tests of the well from which the 
oil or gas is lost and of other wells in the area and, 
the duration of the test period-shall form the basis 

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for determining the volume- of oil or Ras lost during 
t well evaluation tests. The volumes of oil or gas lost 

J as a result of well purgings shall be similarly determined 

unless more reliable information is available. 

(3) Vent inn, or Faring. The volume of casing-head gas 

vented or flared shall be estimated on the basis- of the 
latest available gas-oil ratio tests and the most 
recent data concerning the daily oil production rates 
of the oil wells which produce into the facility where 
the venting or flaring occurs. The Supervisor mav require 
additional testing if no recent well tests have been nade 
The volume of dry gas vented or flared shall be estimated' 
by comparison with the last measured throughput of the 
facility which occurred without venting or flaring and 
by consideration of such factors as individual well tests 
daily production rates, and historical production data or' 
if such information is not available, by such other method 
as shall be approved by the Supervisor. 

2 - Valuo Deter mination for Royalty, or Compensation Purposes 
A. Oil or Gas 

In computing the royalty or other compensation due on oil or 
■• gas which is lost, the value shall be computed in the same 
manner as the Supervisor calculates the value of other oil or 
^ ! aS . S 5 0lci from the lease . communitized tract, or unitized area, 

rieiu, or general area in accordance with 30 CFR 221.47. 



5, 



Ga s Production on W hich Royalty Will N ot Accrue 
A. Lea se Use 

No royalty will be due on gas (dry or casing-head) that is 
used on or for the benefit of the leased land provided that 
it is used for production purposes as provided below: 

(1) Reinjected Gas, Gas which is produced pursuant to a 

lease, communitization agreement; or unitization agree- 
ment, and which is reinjected in accordance with a 'plan 
first approved by the Supervisor into a well or formation- 
subject to that lease or agreement, to aid in the recovery 
of oil or gas in a manner which renders that gas reasonably 
subject to later extraction, will not be subject to the ' 
payment of royalty until finally produced and not so 
reinjected. However, the operator shall report monthly 
tothe Supervisor the volume of gas so produced and 
For^ 9-329 ^ LeSSee ' S Month1 / R e P ort of Operations, 

(2) Other Use. Gas produced pursuant to a lease, communi- 
cation agreement, or unitization agreement and used, with 



the prior approval of the .Supervisor, for operations 



or 



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production purposes on that same lease, communit ized tract 
or unitized area shall not be subject to royalty if that 
gas is (1) used as a fuel in lifting oil or gas; (2) used 
as a fuel in heating oil or jjas for the purpose of placing 
it in a merchantable condition; (3) used as a fuel in 
compressing gas for the purpose of placing it in a 
marketable condition; or, (4) used for the purpose of 
operating automatic valves at production facilities. 

B. Unavoid ably Lost Gas 

No royalty shall be collected on gas which is unavoidably- 
lost as defined below: 

• C*) Ga s Va pors, Gas vapors which are released from 

storage tanks or other low-pressure production vessels 
and which are not collected by a vapor recovery unit 
.or similar system shall be considered unavoidably lost 
when it is not feasible to require the collection or 
the measurement of such vapors. 



(2) Other Gas. Gas which is lost because of line brca 



Kb 



equipment malfunctions, blowouts, fires, and otherwise 
shall be considered unavoidably lost and no royalty or 
compensation shall accrue unless (i) there has been 
negligence on the part of the lessee, or (ii) the 
lessee lias failed to take all reasonable precautions 
against such loss, or (iii) there has been a violation 
of the lease terms, applicable regulations, provisions 
of the approved operating plan, or the written orders 
of the Supervisor (see paragraph 2, page 2 hereof). 
Where gas is intentionally flared or vented, the gas 
shall not be considered unavoidably lost and royalty 
or compensation shall accrue. 

4 • Ad ditional Royalty Obligations 

It is anticipated that a notice of proposed rulemaking will be 
published shortly in the Fede ral Re gister . That notice will be 
for the purpose of advising interested parties of an intent to 
revise those provisions of the current onshore oil and gas 
operating regulations (30 CFR Part 221) which allow produced gas 
to be used royalty free on the lease for production purposes 
and those provisions which preclude the payment of royalty on 
that gas which is determined to have been unavoidably lost. 

In addition, all lessees are advised that on August 26, 1974, 
the Chairman, Conservation and Natural Resources Subcommittee of 
the House Committee on Government Operations requested the 
Comptroller General to determine the validity of the Geological 
Survey's past practice of exempting from the payment of royalty 
that gas 'wiiicr. is used for' product ion purposes or' unavoidably 
lost. Moreover, the Comptroller General was asked, if the past 
practice is ruled invalid, whether royalty should be collected 
retroactively. 

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Should the Department subsequently decide that royalty payments 
arc required for that p.as used for production purposes or unavoid- 
ably lost, the exemptions granted by sections 3(A)(2) and 3(B)(2) 
hereof will no longer be allowed. Because it is possible that 
royalty will be required to be paid retroactively, lessees should 
keep records of the volume of the gas so used or unavoidably lost 
and which is presently exempt from royalty under the provisions of 
sections 3(A)(2) and 3(B)(2). 




•*-/£ 



i^&i e £*&~' 



F. J. Schambeck 

Oil and Gas Supervisor 

Pacific Area 



Attachments 



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APPENDIX I I -I 

U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 
NTL-6 



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>f the 'a Shu.' Multiple Use Advi- 

sory '. will bo hold December 10 

incl lis— ^^ stt 8 ft .m. at the Pioneer 
inn, 221 3. Virginia Street, ll«m>, 
Nevada. 

The Nevada State Multiple Use Advi- 
sory Board was established to ttdvj.se and 
■ouusel the Bureau of Land MiituiKcmont 
Hid the Secretary of Uie Interior on 
Mlioiia2 resource land infttWKumcnt. 

Tins will l)e I he first mcellnR ol the 
lCwly appointed hoard under its charter 
approved by the Secretary of the In- 
crior on August 5, 1975. The ptinxj.se 
f the meeitiifc is to orient the board 
nembers to BLM'k programs, to elect 
fflcors and to discuss necessary com- 
mittees. The following topics will be clls- 
ussed during the meeting: Hole and or- 
anization of the board Including com- 
mittees, eurrent issue:.? nationally and in 
fevada, BLM Nevada district orfjani- 
r.tion study, current legislation affecting 
:ie BuM and the board's perceptions of 
fee BLM. 

Tfce meeting is open to the public. In- 
Bfested persons may make oral pres- 
ateUous to the beard or file written 
iatenienfcs. Ouch lequcsts should be 
mde to the official listed below at least 
5 days prior to the meeting. 
Further Information concerning this 
lectins may be obtained from Carl A. 
Kdlund, Chief, Public Affairs Staff, Bn- 
?:\n of Land Man ■wenient, Nevada State 
•luce, J?-"i;n 300c' Federal Building, SOO 
ooth ' '. Reno, Nevada 89602, tele- 
hone- .--5459. 

MiruX. .,> the meeting will be avail- 
I'Le foi public inspection and copimg 
;;ir weaks after the meeting at the ,Uu- 
tru of Land Maaagurnent, Nevada state 
i.GiCe, K-norn 3041, Federal Building, 300 
•ooth Street, Reno, Nevada 89502, 

E. I. Rowland, 



NOTICES 

Wn.I.MiBTTH Ml'lltlHIAN 
WfHfATCHfcti NATIONAL TOHKOT 
IMmrty tHsiurii'.nt District 
20 N„ It. 17 K., 



Boo. 1, portions of HVV',.', NWt', . BKUKWl,',, 

tmcl NW',HV,'v:,; 
Sue. 3, portions of NI'T'.;,SiKVi. 
Furlhsr riCKcrltird ai roilown: 
BoRtnnlut; nl. Comer No. I, the V, Bortlot; 
Corner <omu,oii to .'.cm:.. I mid :!, T. 20 
N.. H. 17 V.. 
Front CotlMT No f by iihMch ami bounds; 
N. 73 57* E, 10liS.no rv«t lo OorniT Nu. 
Ii; N. 90" 00' I... 34G.M fi't-t to CTuniur 
No, .'I; ,4. 0" DQ' ]■;. 129,4!! feet to Cloruur 
■ HW W„ 3S6.0S loot i.o Gamer 
' 13" V,'.. 12G.03 foot to Corner 
3!)' V.'., 1372.50 fort t.o Censor 
' 53' W., 291.00 reel to Corner 
* 48" W., yria.06 (bce to Corner 
No. U; S. OS" 04' W„ 307.2:3 fed to Co«jcr 
No. 10; n. 0" 00' E., 542.10 feet to Corner 
No. 11; N. 73° 07' E., 708.97 teot to Corner 
No. l; the pi am of boginniag. 

Tlie area described contains approxi- 
mately 23.7fi acres hi Kittitas County, 
Washington. 

Hakold A. Berenss, 
Chief, Branch of Lands 
and Minerals Operations. 

|FR Doc 75 "10044 Filed 11- 10 -7G;8:45 nm] 



l'ir, 


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State Director, Nevada. 
Novembers, 1575. 

jFR Doo.75-30242 Filed 11-10 75;8:4f> ftml 



[OH 13863 (Was): 
WASHINSTOri 

i &"t Te!Trsifiaii.yrs O' 



n 



Notice of Termination of Proposed 
Withdrawal £nd Reservation of Lands 

Octo-l-r 30. 1975. 
Notice of wi application Serial No. OR 
*S53 (Wash.), for withdrawal and res- 
■vatfen of lands was published as Fro- 
:al RsicrsTKi Document no. fr 75-0093 
l pace 12131 of the Iskub for March 17, 
175. The applicant agency has cancelled 
5 itpplicn tion v, hieh involved the lands 
■scribed below. Therefore, pursuant to 
e regulations contained in 43 ofk 
ij)1.2-5(b), such lai;d;i will he »t 10 a.m. 
l December 5, 1975, relieved of the 
sreiattvo elfortof Uie above-mcalioneci 
iplice.tion. 

Tiie latwla involved in this notice of 
I'mirta' ■■•)'*: 



Geological Survey 

[NTL 6] 

FEDERAL AND INDIAN Oil. AND GAS 

LE-ASc'^ 

Approval of Operations 

Notice is hereby Riven that the Geo- 
logical Survey proposes to formalize its 
procedures for approval of all applica- 
tions for permits to conduct operational 
or construction activities on onshore 
Federal and Indian oil and gas leases. 
Tin; proposed Notice also prescribes the 
JnJorniafcioa which a lessee or operator 
must submit in support of applications 
to conduct operations. 

Interested parties may submit written 
comments, objections, and suggestions to 
the Chief, Conservation Division, U.S. 
Geological Survey, National Center, Mai! 
Stop 650, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, 
Rcston, Virginia 220.92, on or before De- 
cember 14, 1975. 

It is hereby certified that the economic, 
and inflationary impacts of proposed No- 
tice to Lessees and Operators, NTL--G, 
have been carefully evaluated in accord- 
ance with OM1J Circular A-107. 



V. E. 



McKmc?ey, 
Director. 



Notice to Lkssmls and Opeuators of Fku- 
i:rai. and Indian Onkhoue On. and Oas 
Lkasks (N'l'F-GI 

Pursuant to the National Kiivironmen- 
ial Policy Act of tOOfl (K3 Stat. 861! >, the 
Department of the Interior is charged 
with the responsibility of assuring that 
oil and i;.rs operations on leased lands 



under Its jurisdiction are conducted with 
due nvSftrd for the protection of the en- 
vironment. Therefore, all operations 
which are conducted on onshore Federal 
.'mil Indian oil and fn.es louse must con- 
form to the reqniivinehU ol this Notice 
as well as those contained In the lease 
and in the Oil and (las Operating Hern- 
iations. Title SO CPU Part 221. 

I. GllNflUI, 

In oid.r Unit the environmental im- 
pact of proposed operation* may ho 
properly evaluated, all applications to 
conduct leasehold operations or con- 
struction activities must be accompanied 
by an appropriate surface use plan. As a 
minimum, such applications and surface 
use plans must provide a detailed de- 
scription of the technical aspects of the 
proposed operation or activity, the mag- 
nitude of surface disturbance involved, 
and the procedures to bo followed in 
rehabilitating the surface once the op- 
eration or construction activity has been 
completed. Specific requirements In this 
regard are set forth in Sections HiB>, 
m, and V hereof, One copy of the sur- 
face use plan must be attached to each 
cony of the application to conduct op- 
erations or construction activities. 

Applications to conduct operations or 
construction activities with attache J sur- 
face use plans should be filed at least 30 
days in advance of the contemplated 
starting date of any operation or con- 
struction activity in order to allow suffi- 
cient time in which to schedule and con- 
duct, if necessary, a joint field inspection 
by appropriate personnel of the Geolog- 
ical Survey, the Federal surface miui.vn- 
men!: agency, the lessee or operator, and, 
if practical, the lessee's or operator's con- 
tractors and subcontractors who will rcr- 
totsa the work. However, the early jiiinrr 
of an application is no ku;- ran tee that 
approval thereof will be granted within 
the 50-day period, as environmental con- 
siderations or current workload in the 
affected Federal agencies may result in 
further delay. 

Lessees and operators have the respon- 
sibility to see that their exploration,' de- 
velopment, production, and construction 
operations are conducted in a manner 
which (l) affords maximum safeguard* 
for the environment: (2) results in the 
proper rehabilitation of disturbed lands; 
and, i3) assures the protection of the 
public health and safety. In that regard, 
lessees and operators will be held fully 
accountable for their contractors' and 
subcontractors' compliance with the 
applicable laws, regulations, and the re- 
quirements of the approved permit and 
surface use plan. 

All approvals of proposed operations 
as we)) as subsequent instructions and 
regulation thereof will ronio from {.he 
District Engineer or Area Oil and Oas 
Supervisor of the Geological Survey. 
However, the Federal surface manage- 
ment agency will establish the rehabili- 
tation requirements and will be available 
for consultation during rehabilitation 



rtDFRAl REGISTER, '/Ol. U), HO ?1R- 



-lUtSDAV. NOVCMSFR I 1 
"9/"7 



nirrittoiM N«iw« addresses, mid phone 'vcyor or eugtaer; <3) Uio elevation or exi^ : nsiw damage to tbc cnvironni.nl 

Sir. of i- ' opnaU- prmUcI of Uie above Rett level of the ground mid derrick will be w ithheld until the plan Is motfl- 

■ rX-\c; Kurvevnmi the Federal sur- floor or rotary kclly buahSw; (3) the fled .Additional mltlgaUnff measures h« 

' ■'•• • "'Vm-eincrt nrency. as well as kcoIop.jc name of the sur; ace formation; provided, or. alternatives to the proposed 

,' "i smrfar'e use .areas, will he fur- c-t) the type of tools and other equip- action are agreed upon, 

i. he lessee or operator on Its ap- meat to be utilized; (ft* the proposed A GUlBK) 1NF , S fo r jiie preparation or 

)JV« «/copy of the permit and surface drillinic depth; 'ti> the estimated tops ol surface use and operations plaks 

,..., „i„« ' Important urolouic markets; (7) the c.sti- 

J ,™ ..ml «... ,• d,-- -. v. .1! (. - their mated depth.-, ul which water, oil. pan. In Uie preparation of surface use and 

,' rs „,' ml ■ -o lr e .i rm. .». or other mineral deposits are ejected operation, plans, lessees and operators 

' „ I ' m! tL to I» encountered: '.') th- proposed cas- should adhere clorciy to the folio* row: 

•"uviU mn e a v i' i- I. I"' oWlm Includm." the sue. rraoe, 1. BsMino roarts. A e,ible map «(JSOS 

tc-Us Jt> o,i n i \,iukiu. hi. > r ;il .| U ,v, lor collapse, topographic or e-tuntv mad map oi n 

•Ti"',? 1 'SnTlW ' ■ I. •'-/' Viiinil III eaVa,\lrh lf ., UP „.■•?... „nl. i n « than I inch « mil,. Mm.1I 

■ •'•olo,.t<,il " nu< ' '■'•'^'■' ( - ' ........,„ .,.n„... .•. ,n, i,l i-m ■tK.-ii it." I'" used lor ocatint! Uio propped well 

;:!;:.;.rt\ i ;;-'c;::,r:.o:;:; ,i ;:. I 'i; ,,; : ;, ; ." flts. ...*'. «. •., ■.<.»* n «.,■.,.« ■ r..e ,. W ,. T . .,,,,,.. 

""'"* m c , , "'" v< » ' iiuMiniii(.M»l i.ir^i.'-e-nn. tolhi! moat on includm,- appropriate 'Hi- 

tons in DfliiMN m ^ „,, inn { „. „,.,-i mm .s l,o. he em- All proposed »cccss roads Khali be a >- 
tv n,nTt,«r opvpamov. moved- il2J the testinrc. lopxmv/. mid propria tely labeled or eolor coded. Addi- 
II. 15.ui.UNn Opmaiio • K^vwroimtobc followed! (13) an> tionaliv. all existing roads within a ra- 
ft. pnctrMiNAr.Y environmental ki en w ,,i. nolm .;i , U 'essurc.s or temperatures ex- dins of three miles from the location ot 




uft file with the GcoTopieaJ consideration of the implication. The location Knould be shown. 

Surveys District Engineer or Area Oil District Engineer or Area, oil and Gas Any plans for the mprovemsnt and, or , 

and Gas Supervisor and the appropriate Supervisor un; rewire additional in- maintenance of existlns roaos .held , 

office of the involved Federal surface formation art »anv.nted. also be stated. 

m nanenienta,e,H:y.u u„,o,r„phic ,uap A copy ol BP»rm e.d. a; e.h ,a lion f- rer- miormwtoii n quired by item Nob. 3 , 

(or eruivalent) of a scale not lass than mU ( „ dl -iu and the a< , : o»ip»n>lnB «u- n«d 4 of this subsection may d So bs 

1 Ineh.l mi:a which shows the preferred fnce use and openilUev pimi shaii he shov.n on this map if appiopiiatelj 

lof-iM'iu biki U.o general lopo[.n'i.pliie [m *U-(i at the diillM.'te. la V, Cl< i', ! ,' , .. „,?« r , lf ,- r .„ tK „, 

t . in the a -en This will permit U.a .... „, _ „ , „ , .,.,, 2. Vlntinrd »cee.« roads. Ii form,tion 

i "i ,'f-e ' in-rnn-ut. agency, III. Vuwi-r.v.Ki km m t w'.«. -■•<. m this rceard Is to be submnted on a > 

^Vv, th e fe'ee' or ope^'r, ^p,^ Opmiattoks Puah hlr „ c „, ale ma „ (not Ic s S than 4 inches 

dnSTcf lime and r. ;0 ney for wrwys, to A surface use and operations plan in ■- 1 mile) and shall appropriately iden- 

review its recovlj ror any potonlW con- sufficient detail to permit a complete up- tify all permanent and temporary access, 

filets with other resource values, if con- , )V aisal of the. environmental effect* as- roads that are to be constructed oi re- 

flicts are note.', a joint eonteivn'.e or SO cmf.ed with Uie proposed project must coiwtfucted. m connection with m.oi..i- ; 

field inspection, as appropriate, by too |, e submitted, in triplicate, to the Dis- Innr and production of .the propped was, , 

Oeolo'ical Survev. the Fidnal s.iri'aee ( , vif .(, Knainecr or AveA Oil ami Gas Sup- Width, maximum grad<o. turnouts. oicm- 

manaaenient. aeenc.-. and I ho operator ,.„,,,„ vv iiM live 'ipphcnlion for permit, aue d«sij?n. location and s'^e 01 cubreir.v ■ 

may be scheduled to reaolv probk-n h , „,.„,, and s.irhic.inK materia . b ny, fOiall 1. ! 

^\s The Geological Si ..-vi v will send a copy .staled. At, the lime ol su, iwion, the 

,,1'^ch plan to Uie r.deral surface nv.ui- location of ad proposed nr 0) recon- 

ii. At'1'i.ieAiP..ii; ror. i'Brmst -o muu, !VKm cf.i smo'v. Win ii i-ossibia, c pre- strucied roads shall be stnl ■ •■"■•. c ei , 

All drtllfn.f operations mus-l U con- iiminary mild d'evdopment plan or drill- modiP-.ation of proposed ' ■ , r! ;; ; ;^ 

ducted in accordance with a permit or | tl( , .vhecule i nhoul.l :>1m> l>0 SUhmittod to may bo reimrcd alter the 

development, plan which has the prior , t ll.,W lead Iliac lor • va I. latin,-, environ- acceph'O. 

appnnsdonhel.islric. Kn.Pncer «.r Area „„,„.,,! ,ooside,at,oi.a. .e.-..unv c.ollicb . Information should a '«' b« n -» . 

O and Gas Supcvf.or. and land use planning ai.erna lives. to ind.eate where °™\ n *}™™£"^ 

'Hie pernn, or ^^-{^.K h ™ ^^ ItZ^JZ^ ' ^ ^X^uffitoVA ^ | 

and a niiilli-poliit ..surface use and opera- componenf.s, and na-liul.' .ulequuU iiu .1.. I.ni ., ,wiu , . u 

tc;ve;1"ha:;r;i'o7:a;;"e , ;^o;; , of ?,"« Xn'rfSil^S aaiUed in inform- C T^««. 0/ ^ gr*. This in- j 

£w ^t tet S£ en nt betweeo'the I'eUe i 'Vith the provisions of the lease at- formation should befmiiUed on a map 

or operator and the surface owner or a taehed stipulations, and the guidelines of suitable scale and 1 ncluc. ..1) ; c.iis 

^U^,,un fori!, the reimbihtation re- provided by this Notice In deve on n, 'W™™**^^^^ i 

aiiVovIv v of lids H..II.T. ,M,vt...nmen.:,l ,,„. id.a.dtaia. and lo,al poaed local on of a dcvelopnu ,. v c,l. 

mU st.provideinform..t.oncon.-..r.,m.! .1) i.-m. a-<i to ■'» «,u.i < ^,. ' „ . , ,,„„„,, h0 R , U)Wn on n mai> o£ suitable ; 

iiniKAi UH.i-.tlR, vol »'. N.i Jill IIUMIAC movimiiik 11. ill 

tit 



flic 





I 
I 

u 

I 

[] 

Q 
I 
1 
1 
I 
I 
I 

X 

I 

I 

'■> 

I 

I 



NOTICES 



one-mik rt'.dius of the propped 



,;tton o/ fanfc ttattnrirs. pitKlue- 
tio;T"7SCu , i*ies, arid j)rorfui-(ii»i', u'll^erhuf. 
ami itreicc fines. Kxi. fins tank Imtterlr: . 



production 



fa'-tllili- T). i irJ production, 
gathering, or servhe imo.i within ft one- 
mile radius of t-'-.r proposed location 
which are owned or controlled by the 
I W t« or operator should he shown c;:i a 
ninp or pint of suitable scale. Tin: type of 
each present facility ami the exact na- 
ture of each existing lino 'oil How line, 
g&.s gathering lino, Injection line, or 
water disposal hue) should Ik identified 
s-r:d it should he noted which, tf any, of 
SiU.1 lines are buticd. If new facilities 
(tank battery, other production equip- 
ment, and lines) aro contemplates in the 
event production t« established and Uio.se 
facility's are lo be iocatw 1 . at other than 
on the veil site Itself, the map or plot 
furnished in this regard- must also indi- 
cate the location all proponed nev. facili- 
ties. Future prospects far additional de- 
velopment of the leasehold should bo 
considered in the sithifl of new facilities. 
However final approval to construct such 
new facilities will not be nmnW until 
after detailed plans have been submitted 
and evaluated pursuant to Section V 
hereof. 

6. Location and typr. of mUrr supply 
(rivers, creel";, lake..-, ponds, end wrllr) . 
This lnforr-aUorj may be shown by 
quorter-fiu; er section on a plat or map 
c* —hlc scale or may Iks a written 
< ion. The source of all we ter to bo 

ijk drilling the proposed v.oH should 

bc^Wfcd The method of transporting the 
water shall be stated and any scecss 
roads neded to herd the water will be 
described hi items Nos. 1 or 2. as ap- 
propriate. However, the Survc;. t, ap- 
proval of the surface use and operations 
plan does not relieve the lessee or oper- 
ator from obtaining any other aulhon/,a- 
tion which may be resumed for the nr-c 
o f such water. Moreover, if a water sup- 
ply well Is to be drilled on the len.se . h 
must be. so stated under this item and the 
District Engineer or Area Oil mid Gas 
Supervisor may require the filing of a 
geparate application for permit to drul. 

7. Source of construction jnatsruili. 
Tills information may be shown by 
quarter-quarter section on a plat, or man 
of suitable scale or may lv a written 
(iescr)ptlon. The proposed source thai' 
acter. and use of all construction male- 
rials such as sand. (Travel, stone anil soil 
material should be stated. Any ao-c^ 
roads needed to haul such materials 



should be descn'oed in hem N«' 
as appropriate. 

B. Method-, for hchtUiini mist' (I 

A brief, written description Ma 

given of the methods and local 

safe containment and disposal 

type of waste materia! (C.uttinns. f 

salts, chemicals, and sewanei w. 1 

ruIU; from the drilling of the p 

" UfeeWvC the narrative sin 

plans for the ever.tual d;.- 

ns fluids and any produce- 

\^t recovered during teatlm: 

Uons. 



...Si// 



an 



lor 
el i. ail 

•arbafse. 
itch re- 

imposed 

add in- 

;,o-.a 1 of 

I oil or 

npera- 



9. AncUhtrji facili/ica, "'he plan or 
subsequent amendment? to such plans 
shall identify all ancillary facilities such 
as camps and airstrips as l-> their loca- 
tion land area reiimtvd.nnd the methods 
and sl.aiuiard.-i to be employed In their 
construct!,, u. Btlch facilities shall bo 
shown on a r;v{) of suitable sc.de and 
shall he staked on the r.rounu 

]0 Well situ twin!. A plat of snitaole 
scale <not less inan l Inch ■ f>0 feet) 
ineludinw cross section diapvams of the 
drill pad ami the relar.lon to tepopr-aphy 
are remurcd, The plat should also In- 
clude the proposed local led of the mud 
tanks pits i reserve, hum. and trash), 
pipe Yu<Ks, aeceas mad, turnaround 
areas pnriung areas, living fseiliUo.s soil 
material stockpile, and the orientation 
of the rta with respect to the pad and 
other rncilitios. Plans hi line the reserve 
'pit should be indicated. 

The exterior dimensions of (he pad 
and reserve, pit shall be specified and will 
be staked on the ground. 

11. /"'/ess lor restoration of the mr~ 
lace. State the proposed program for 
surface restoration upon completion of 
the operation such as stockpiling topsoil. 
leveling res c.edlrw. and seed mixture. 
Such plans will be reviewed .lor adequacy 
by the appropriate Federal surface man- 
agement npency. A proposed timetable. 
for the commencement and completion 
of rehabilitation operations must be 
provided.. 

12 Oilier information. Include a gen- 
oral 'description of the topography, BO 11 
eharaetei-isfics. formation litbologles, 
geohvie features, flora, fauna, and other 
nspcctn of the area such as other surface 
use activities. 

The rurface ownerahip (Federal. In- 
dian Slate, or private) at the well loca- 
tion and for ah lands which are to be 
c<-o:.:ed by newly constructed roads 
sihmdd bo Indicated. 

Anv available information which 
would be. useful in cvalmvtlns the envi- 
ronmental impact of the proposed oper- 
ation iricdudiiuv proximity lo steep hill- 
sides 'and auhi.es, water wells, poucfe, 
lakes, or breams, occupied dwellings, or 
other facilities, and archeologlcal, his- 
torical, or cultural sites should be In- 
cluded. Information concerning required 
cuts ana fills during the construction of' 
road--- and the locai-ui should also be 

I'Ul'llhhrd. 

All conr,: us tlon practices necessary to 
aeeonmiodate poU-nliat KCOloBtC. hu7.ards 

sliould liu dis.-us.M-d under the appropri- 
ate items of the plan, 

13. L.'isee'-' or i,pe.-«7or's reprencnta- 
ilp'r.' Ineiildc the name, address, and 
phone number of the lessee's or oper- 
ator's held r< prcsentativi? who is respon- 
sible for assui ua; compliance with the 
approved suilace use and operation.-, 

piau. 

Pi Ccr/i'sp '."<ns. Thr f illowdns state- 
u; ent is to' he inroniiirated in the plan 
and must h" si;:ncd hy the lessee's or 
operator's he's I representative who is 
identilied in Item No. 13 of ihe plan: 



Ian 



alllar 
'., 'i 

1 n 
i i-l . 

■a-"' 



rilteita aii<l access rouLe: tliftt I riti 
with the coiiflttlona which pr.-sciulv 
.it the s,tuti'!in;ats nuide In thin pltm 

'.ho h'-sl "I lay kisiwleil,'/', true nn<l 
uiid. tin,:. Uai umrk miHAiifati'd satn 



ill. 



V 



lili-ii 1 



sulennl.r.i. S 
n nail the U-ri 
r ih ppprovil. 



pi-reln will bfi prr- 

- and Its c<in- 

In ci)iirori"l'.y with 

roel cuali ' !'.ie-. ua'Icr 



Nnmf- u.ml Title 

IV. rii.'vieris'Mr.si'M, Analysis 

KlSo'IHI-.SUSJTS 

SVhen en application for permit to drill 
Is received, an r-ndte inspection normally 
will he reciuireii. If made, It will include 
the District Engineer or Area Oil ana 
Gas Supervisor, Ihe lessee or operator. 
the Federal surface 1 manaeement agency, 
and others includfnf! the dirt contractor, 
as rinproprtite. The purpose of tihs in- 
spert.lon will he to seled the most feasible 
nnd environmentally acceptable areas for 
well sites (considei-lnti taadopi". fnctors 
ami Fcieral and State regulations') . se- 
re-.-, roads and oth'T prolTO-n-d surface 
use uveas Ace.irdinply, lessees and opera- 
tors are ei-.-om-ae.ed to desii-nale future 
tievr|oj,mr -ill. or ririi'lm; sites so that sev- 
eral locations may he inspected at. one 
time 

when sia-h an inspection is made, o o 
environmental analysis wilt usually lv 
prepared hy the I lislric.t F,n'!ioce»- or As, :i 
OH and Oas Supervisor. Said an.u'\ sis v, ill 
identify methods for mill.eaUn« the. po- 
tential adverse env'roumental C'fTeets e- 
soelaled with the propnse.d operntion and 
will be the basis of the approving offi- 
cial's determination as to whether appro- 
val of the proposed activity would consti- 
tute n maior Federal action significantly 
affecting the qualify of the human en- 
vironment as defined by Section 102':?' 
(C) of ihe National Environmental Polio 
Aci of 1959. Any rurfsee protection and 
rehabilitation requirements specified by 
the Federal snrfa-e management agency 
will normally be made a part of any sub- 
sequently approved permit or pnd/or the 
surface use and operations plan 

Due to the probahdity of a required on- 
site inspection, the required input from 
other Federal nwneics. and the varia- 
tion.:; in the level of drillinr: activity, le"- 
secs and opernlors are encomesed lo file 
application.-, well tn aduiUee ei the lime 

e,.;role-liee Opieril- 



tt-hen it Is desirei 

lion ■'. 

V. Aii-r.oeM. oi Si 



si ! >: 



■11 VI lnMS 

or eondi - 
len siat.:- 
ne filed on 
ic District. 



X Hereby ri'i-l it v I lull 
il'.r,, '. yiijp'»i-vi>iun. Ii 



,,m . n ue'ii-r my 
eii'i-U Hie pro 



Bef'-re repairing, rteepcniiu 
tioniiif! a well, a detailed wi 
nier.t of the plan of work mils 
Form 9-331 or 9-331 with 
Fiicineer or Area Oil and Cias Supervisor 
and' approval obtained before the work is 
started. Anv proposed ehanac in an; such 
plan of work must also receive the prior 
approval of the District Engineer or Area. 
Oil and Gas Supervisor. 

Lessees and operators are also required 
to submit for the approval of the District 
Fnpincer or Area Oil and Gas Supervisor 



ttDERAI FEOIiUR, VOL, 10, NO. SIS -JUESDAT, KOVEMEfR 11, l?7S 

2/f 



526 to 

ft , pint) prior to undertakim: any 

Sll ^ , lt , new construction, rccnii- 

Rtrtferifm or alteration of existing luna- 
tics inrludinf: roads, (Huns, hues or other 
production facilities on i\n.v lease when 
tiddlitonrU surface disturbance will result. 
Sufficient information must bo submit- 
ted to permit a proper evaluation of tin- 
proposed surface disturbing activities as 
well as any planned accommodations 
necessary to mitigate potential adverse 
environmental effects, 

The environmental analysis procedures 
discussed in Section IV of this Notice 
will also apply to such subsequent oper- 
ations which have, the potential inr sig- 
nificant surface disturbance although 
these requirements may be somewhat less 
in established producing areas. 

VI A6RKBMBNI FOK • REHABILITATION OF 
' PniVATELY-OWNEB SURFACE 

Where the surface Is privately owned 
or is owned by an Indian allottee, each 
application for permit to drill or to con- 
duct other surface disturbance activities, 
shall contain information concerning the 
surface owner's rehabilitation require- 
ments H written agreement between the 
lessee or operator and the surface owner 
is not necessary if a letter from the lessee 
or the operator setting forth the surface 
owner's ' rehabilitation requirements is 
furnished. Payment or damages in lieu 
of full restoration will not be an aecept- 
a < b.Uifntc for a normal cleanup and 

i : atton program. 

V V irranRcmcnts have been made, or 
iflSfoj-matlon eunrcrntnrc such arranr.e- 
menu is not [urnished, the Dlsl.net Kn- 
elneer or Area Oil and Gas Supervisor 
will request the Federal surface manage- 
ment agency to recommend the neces- 
sary surface restoration requirements. In 
such cases, the lessee or operator will be 
expected 'to comply with these rcbiwiU- 
tation requirements, if any, regardless o: 
the arrangement made with the surface 
oviv-r Provided, however, that subse- 
quent reasonable requests by the surface 
owner that pits, roads, and other facili- 
ties be left intact may he honored It 
written proof of prior airangements has 
been provided, the Federal surface man- 
agement agency will be asked to recom- 
mend surface rehabilitation require- 
ments to the District Engineer or Area. 
Oil and Gas Superior giving full con- 
sideration to the preferences of the land- 
owner. 

VI. WST.1 ABANDONMENT 

No well abandonment operations may 
be commenced in the absence of the prior 
approval of the District Mutineer or Area 
Oil and Ga.s Supervisor. However, the 
Federal surface management aneuei' may 
request, additional surface rehabilitation 
measures at abandonment and these re- 
quirements are normally made a part of 
the Geological Survey's approval ot 
,i-jidoinneut. U)xm completion of Uio 
donment and rehabilitation oper- 
.. (ij., i,.;..!',;' or operator should 

V j C( the Dist-i ict Kii'dneer or Area Oil 
jjd Gas Supervisor that the location to 
rcadv for Inspection. However, flu: 
abandonment will not he approved until 



NOTICES 

the surface rehabilitation work required 
hy the drillim: permit or abandonment 
notice has been completed and the re- 
quired vof'.efntUm is established to the 
mi flsl notion of tlic appropriate I'Vderni 
snirl'ac.e inanaiu'iucni np.eney. 

VII. WATIIR VVK1.1. OONVlffiSlON 
The complete ali.mdonniiHif of a well 
which lias encountered usable fresh wa- 
ter will not lie approved if Hie Federal 
surface management agency determines 
it wants to acquire the well. If, at aban- 
donment, the Federal surface manage- 
ment aaencv elects to assume further re- 
sponslbilifi'for the well, it will reimburse 
the lessee or operator for the cost of any 
recoverable casing left in the hole solely 
because: it is to lie completed as a water 
well. The lessee or operator will abandon 
tire well to the base of the deepest fresh 
water zone of interest as required by the 
District Engineer or Area Oil and Gas 
Supervisor and will complete the surface 
cleanup and rehabilitation as rewired 
by the drilling permit or abandonment 
notice Immediately upon completion of 
the conversion operations* 
[PR Doc. 75 206+1 Filed 11-10-75;8:40 am] 



National Park Service 
BOSTON NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
ADVISORY COMMISSION 
Notice of Meeting 
Notice is hereby given in accordance 
with the Federal Advisory Committee 
Act, Public Law 92-463. that a meeting of 
the'uostoii National Historical Park Ad- 
visory Commission will be held at 10:00 
am. on December 8, 1975, at the North 
Atlantic Regional Office, Room 715, ISO 
Causeway Street. Boston, Massachusetts. 
The Commission was established by 
Public Law 03-431 to advise the Secre- 
tary of the Interior on matters relating 
to the development of the Boston Na- 
tional Historical Park. 

The members of the Advisory Com- 
mission, arc as follows: 

Mr. Richard A. I-erenson, Chairman, Brook - 
linn, MasHMtmsetls. 
Dr. Bvelyu Murphy, Lexington, Massalicu- 

ssetts. 

Mr. Byron D, Rushing, Boston, Massacliu- , 

SottS 

Mrs. Kfithpriue D. Kane, Benton, Massachu- 
setts- i . »« ,.„ 
Mr. Maurice 1". O'Sliea, Charwstown, massa- 

chusettK. .... 

Mr. any A. Benlnatl, Beaton, Mmssaclui- 

selts. 

The matters to be discussed at tills 
meeting include: 

1. Tin' rolo of KatlomU Parko flervhw ad- 
visory e.inini'ssie.u.c 

2. Tlif orwani".«f!..tt ° r u,c Commission. 
3 ataiim of lundlm;, 

4! stuuis of I" 11 '- administration nud op- 
erations. , 

S Suuais i.f r.ioperaHve ivnreenienr.. 
B \ review or nHmn»tlvf> plana for (ho 
mauKeneii, development an.l mm «>f «"> 
r.-i. .ur.es hieluiiotl within the lloalon Na- 
tional irmtorleal Park. 

The tneeliiuT will be open U> the pub- 
lic However, labilities and space are ma- 
lted and It is expected that not more 
than 25 persons will !>o able to attend 



the sessions. Any member of the public 
may file with the committee a written 
statement concerning the mutters I* be 
diseiissed. 

Persons wishing further Information 
concerning this inwlmx, or who wish to 
.submit written statements, may contact 
Huidi 1). Gurney. Project Manaper, 
Boston National Historical Park at 
617-223-3777. Minutes of the mooting 
will be available for public inspection 
four weeks after the meeting at the of- 
fice of the North Atlantic Region. 150 
Causeway Street. Boston, Massachusetts. 

Dated: October 23, 1973. 

Jf.PRY D. Wackks, 
Regional Director. 

I Fit Doe. 75-30370 Filed 11-10-75; 8:45 Bill] 

NORTH ATLANTIC REGION ADVISORY 
COMMISSION 

Notice of Meeting 

Notice is hereby tdven in accord.-! nee 
with the Federal Advisory Committee 
Act that a meeting of tiie North Atlantic 
Region Advisory Commission will be held 
at 9 a.m., e.d.t. on December 4, i&>o 
through 4:30 p.m. on December 5. 191 •>, 
at Minute Man National Historical Par.-:, 
Lexington, Massachusetts, 

The purpose of the Commission is to 
provide for the free exchange of ideas 
between the National Park Service ana 
the public, and to facilitate the solicita- 
tion of advice or other council ircrn 
members of the public, on problems and 
programs pertinent to the North Atlantic 

Region. , , 

The members of the Commission are 

as follows: 

Mr. John N. Cole. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

Ma. Antoinette F. Downing 
Frovkleuce, Rhode Islam 

Mrs. Arthur Fenske, 

Green Village, Now Jersey 

Mr. Charles H. W. Foster, 
Needhain, Mas&achusottH. 

Mr. George T. munition, Dov "ew Hamp- 
shire. , 

M John P.Keith. Hartsdate, New s H*. 

Mr. Frederic* E. Mlcha, On tarlo, N< \. c 

Mr. William A. Nierlng, Gales Ferry, u. • • - 

' Mr. William n. Finney, Chuiotto, Vermont. 

The purpose of tills meeting is as 
follows : 

] Briftflng hy the North Atlantic Regional 
Director on current evens In the Region. 

2. Disruss and prepare nine, report of 
Snrlnpfield Armory vi.-.il. 

a, Receive and cUseil-s rep'>rt of Ae.ulla 
Ntilli'ival Park vtsll , 

4, 'Che linnl UlSCUi-ioll of Ul!.:el la:': und 

rieeie.uh.n. 

5. iM-.en.s^ien of N.itein.il lure. ..ei\a< 
Hiituittiti; I're.eedure. 



r i'h(" meeting will be open to the pu.mc, 
However, facilities and space for ficeom- 
modaline members of the public are 1 un- 
ited mid persons will be aernmmuda.ed 
on a first come, lirst served basis. Micro 
Will be a tour of Minute Man Nai,e.:ial 
Historical Park betjinninff at the Mieru- 
ton PexliiKton, Concord at 9 AM. Dec< m- 
ber 4 1075 and ending at 12 noon at the 



K-riERAL RtGISTCE, VOL 10. 



NO. 218— TUESDAY, 

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APPENDIX II-J 

CHAPTER 632 of the OREGON 
ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 

Department of Geology and 
Mineral Industires 



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OREGON ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 

CHAPTER 632 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL 
INDUSTRIES 



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10-002 
10-004 
10-006 
10-008 
10-010 

10-012 

10-014 
10-016 
10-018 
10-020 
10-122 
10-124 
10-126 
10-128 
10-130 
10-132 
10-134 
10-136 
10- 138 
10-140 
10- 142 
10-144 



10-146 
10-148 
10-150 

10-151 

10-152 

10-154 



Table of Contents 



General Rules 

Supremacy of Special Rules 

Secretary to the Board 

Definitions 

Application and Permit to 

Drill 

Changes of Location or 

Ownership 

Drilling Practices 

Identification of Wells 

Organization Reports 

Surface Equipment 

Blow-Out Prevention 

Drilling Fluid 

Cleaning Wells 

Boiler or Light Plant 

Rubbish or Debris 

Tubing 

Chokes 

Separators 

Fire Walls 

Slush Pits to be Filled In 

Deviation 

Report of Result of Shooting, 

Perforating or Treating of 

Well 

Vacuum Pumps Prohibited 

Production Practice 

Pulling Outside Strings'of 

Casing 

Notification of Fire, Breaks, 

Leaks, or Blow-Outs 

Producing From Different 

Strata Through the Same 

Casing String 

Determining and Naming 

Pools 



10-156 
10-158 

10-160 
10-162 
10-164 

10-166 

10- 168 
10-172 

10-174 



10-176 

10-178 
10-180 
10-182 
10-184 
10-186 
10-188 

10-190 
10-192 

10-194 



10-196 



Spacing Units 

Location and Spacing of 

Wells 

Pooling of Small Tracts 

Illegal Production 

Commingling of Production 

Prohibited 

Reports by Purchasers and 

Producers 

Use of Earthen Reservoirs 

Operators to Assist in 

Reservoir Surveys 

Measurement of 

Potential Open-Flow of 

Gas Wells 

Supervision of Open-Flow 

and Pressure Tests 

Duration of Tests 

Notice of Tests 

Gas to be Metered 

Direct Well Pressure 

Gas-Oil Ratio 

Gas-Oil Ratio Surveys 

and Reports 

Gas Utilization 

Disposal of Brine or „ 

Salt Water 

Water Injection and 

Water Flooding of Oil 

and Gas Properties 

Gas Injection of Oil and 

Gas Properties 



10-198 Abandonment, Unlawful 

Abandonment, Suspension, 
Well Plugging 

10-200 Confidential Information 



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OREGON ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 

GENERAL 



Authority for Publication: 

ORS 183.360 (1) 



Contents: 



Text of administrative rules or 
reference thereto for all agencies coming 
within the purview of ORS 183.310-183.510. 

Replacement Pages: 

Additions, amendments or re- 
peals will be published in loose-leaf form 
and distributed as new or replacement pages 
with directions for inclusion in the compi- 
lation. 

Record of Past Rules: 

Replaced rules shouldbe retained 
in a separate file for future reference to the 
prior wording of the amended or repealed 
rules. 

HOW TO CITE 

Cite all material in this compilation by the 
chapter and section number. Example: Oregon 
Administrative Rules, Chapter 274, Section 10-110. 
(Short form: OAR 274-10-110) 

INDEX AND TABLE OF CONTENTS 

An index and table of contents will be pub- 
lished with each chapter. Consideration will be given 
to the publication of a master index and table of con- 
tents upon completion of the compilation. 



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DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES CI I. 632 



[ED, NOTE: Unloss otherwise speci- 
fied, sections 10-002 through 10-200 of 
this chapter of the Oregon Administra- 
tive Rules Compilation were adopted by 
the Department of Geology and Mineral 
Industries January 14, 1954 and filed 
with the Secretary of State January 27, 
1954 as Administrative Order GMI l.j 

Statutory Authority: ORS 520.095 

(ORS citations indicate the statutory 
reference concerning the matter regu- 
lated.) 



10-002 GENERAL RULES. General 
rules shall be state-wide in application 
unless otherwise specifically stated and 
applicable to all lands within the juris- 
diction of the State of Oregon. 

10-004 SUPREMACY OF SPECIAL 
RULES. Special rules will be issued 
when required and shall prevail as 
against general rules if in conflict there- 
with. 

-10-006 SECRETARY TO THE BOARD. 
The director of the State Department 
of Geology and Mineral Industries shall 
act as secretary to the Board. 

10-008 DEFINITIONS. As used in sec- 
tions 10-010 to 10-200, unless otherwise 
required by context: 

(1) "Allowable" shall mean the quan- 
tity of natural gas or oil allowed by 
order of the Board to be produced with- 
in a stated period. 

(2) "Atmospheric Pressure" shall 
mean the pressure of air at sea level, 
equivalent to about 14.7 pounds to the 
square inch. 

(3) "Barometric Pressure" shallmean 
the pressure or weight of air determined 
by the use of a barometer at a given 
point. 

(4) "Barrel" shall mean 42 U. S. gal- 
lons equaling approximately 231 cubic 
inches to the gallon. 

(5) "Blow-Out" shall mean a sudden 
or violent escape of oil or natural gas, 
as from a drilling well, when high for- 
mational pressure is encountered. 

4-1-61 



(6) "Blow-Out Preventer" shall mean 
a heavy casing-head control filled with 
special pates or rams which may be 
closed around the drill pipe, or which 
completely closes the top of the casing. 

(7) "Bottom Hole Pressure" shall me an 
the pressure in pounds per square inch 
at or near the bottom of an oil or gas 
well determined at the face of the pro- 
ducing horizon by means of a pressure 
recording instrument, adopted and recog- 
nized by the oil and gas industry, and 
corrected to the predetermined plane. 

(8) "Casing Pressure" shall mean the 
pressure built up between the casing and 
tubing when the casing and tubing are 
packed off at the top of the well. 

(9) "Casing-Head Gas" shall mean any 
gas or vapor, or both gas and vapor, 
indigenous to an oil stratum and produced 
from such stratum with oil. 

(10) "Combination Well" shall mean 
well productive of both oil and gas in 
commercial quantities from the same 
common source of supply and which has 
sufficient natural pressure to cause gas 
to enter a pipe line carrying more than 
atmospheric pressure. 

(11) "Common Source of Supply" is 
Synonymous with pool. 

(12) "Condensate" shall mean hydro- 
carbons existing in the gaseous state in 
the reservoir, by condensing to a liquid 
at pressures or temperatures belowthose 
of the reservoir. For the purpose of 
brevity, the use herein of the word "oil" 
shall include condensate as defined here- 
in, unless otherwise provided. For in- 
stance, oil well shall mean not onlv an 
oil well but also a condensate weli. 

(13) "Connate Water" shall mean the 
water which was present with the depo- 
sition of solid sediments in an oil or 
gas reservoir and which has not, during 
the oil accumulation, been displaced. 

(14) "Correlative Rights" as used in 
these regulations shall mean that each 
owner or producer in a pool is privi- 
leged to produce therefrom only in such 
manner or amount as not to injure the 
reservoir to the detriment of others or 
to take an undue proportion of the oil or 
gas obtainable therefrom, or to cause 
net drainage between developed units. 

(15) "Cubic Foot of Gas" shall mean 



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CH. 632 



OREGON ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 



the volume of gas expressed in cubic 
feet computed at standard pressure base 
of 14.65 pounds per square inch absolute 
and a standard temperature base of 60 
degree F. 

(16) "Day" shall mean a period of 
twenty-four consecutive hours from 
7 a.m. one day to 7 a.m. the following 
day. 

(17) "Development" shall mean any 
work which actively looks toward bring- 
ing in production, such as erecting rigs, 
building tanks, drilling wells, etc. 

(18) "Developed Area or Developed 
Unit" shall mean a proration unit having 
a well completed thereon which is cap- 
able of producing oil or gas in paying 
quantities; however, in the event it be 
shown, and the Board finds, that a part 
of any unit is nonproductive, then the 
developed area of the unit shall include 
only that part so found to be productive. 

(19) "Differential Pressure" shall mean 
in the case of wellhead measurement the 
difference between the tubing pressure and 
the casing pressure; in the case of an 
orifice meter, the pressure difference 
between the up-stream and the down- 
stream sides of the orifice, a pressure 
difference measured with a differential 
gauge or with a manometer (U tube). 

(20) "Director" shallmean the director 
of the State Department of Geology and 
Mineral Industries. 

(21) "Edge Water" shall mean water 
that holds the oil or gas, or both oil and 
gas, in a higher structural position usu- 
ally encroaching on a pool as the oil or 
gas is recovered. 

(22) "Field" shall mean the general 
area underlaid by one or more pools. 

(23) "Gas" shall mean all natural gas, 
including casinghead gas and other hydro- 
carbons not defined as oil in subsection 
(5) of this section. 

(24) "Gas Allowable" shall mean the 
amount of natural gas authorized to be 
produced by order of the Board. 

(25) "Gas-Oil Ratio" shall mean the 
relation of the gas in cubic feet to the 
production of oil in barrels as accepted 
by pipe lines. 

(26) "Gas Repressuring" shall mean 
the introduction of gaseous substances into 
a pool by artificial means in order to 



replenish, replace, or increase the rese r- 
voir energy. 

(27) "Gas, Sour" shall mean gas which 
contains hydrogen-sulphide, sulphur, or 
other deleterious substances, in sufficient 
quantities to render it unfit for domestic 
light and fuel. 

(28) "Gas Well" shall mean (a) a well 
which produces natural gas only; (b) that 
part of a well where the gas producing 
stratum has been successfully cased off 
from the oil, the gas and oil being pro- 
duced through separate casing or tubing; 
(c) any well capable of producing gas 
in commercial quantities; or (d) a well 
producing from a reservoir containing no 
liquid hydrocarbons. 

(29) "Illegal Gas" shallmean gas which 
has been produced within the State from 
any well or wells in excess of the amount 
allowed by any rule, regulation, or order 
of the Board, as distinguished from gas 
produced within the State not in excess 
of the amount of allowed production by 
any such rule, regulation, or order which 
is legal gas. 

(30) "Illegal Oil" shall mean oil which 
has been produced within the State from 
any well or wells in excess of the amount 
allowed by any rule, regulation, or order 
of the Board, as distinguished from oil 
produced within the State not in excess 
of the amount so allowed by any such 
rule, regulation, or order which is legal 
oil. 

(31) "Illegal Product" shall mean any 
product of oil or gas, any part of which 
was processed or derived, in whole or 
in part, from illegal oil or illegal gas 
or from any product thereof, as dis- 
tinguished from legal product, which is 
a product processed or derived to no 
extent from illegal gas or illegal oil. 

(32) "Indices of Productive Value" 
shall mean the factors to be considered 
in ascertaining the productivity of all 
property in a pool for the purpose of 
fixing the allowable production. These 
indices can mean, at the discretion of 
the Board, potential acreage, gas-oil 
ratios, static reservoir pressures, 
flowing pressures, fluid level draw- 
downs, the well or wells, or any other 
pertinent factors. 

(33) "Mud-laden Fluid" shall mean 

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DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES CH. 632 



any approved mixture of water and clay 
or other material as the term is common- 
ly used in the industry which will ef- 
fectively seal the formation to which it 
is applied. 

(34) "Net Drainage" shall mean the 
drainage or migration of oil or gas with- 
in the reservoir which is not equalized 
by counter-drainage. 

(35) "Nomination" shall mean the state- 
ment made by a purchaser as to the amount 
of oil or gas he is willing to purchase 
for a given period. 

(36) "Oil" shall mean crude petroleum 
oil and any other hydrocarbons, regard- 
less of gravity, which are produced atthe 
well head in liquid form and from gas 
by ordinary production methods. 

(37) "Oil Allowable" shall mean the 
amount of oil authorized to be produced 
by order of the Board. 

(38) "Oil Well" for the purpose of 
the rules, shall mean any well not a gas 
well capable of producing oil or con- 
densate in paying quantities. 

(39) "Operator" shall mean any person 
who, duly authorized, is in ■ charge of 
the development of a lease or the oper- 
ation of a producing well. 

(40) "Overage, Overproduction" shall 
mean the oil or gas produced in excess 
of the allowable fixed by the Board. 

(41) "Owner" shall mean the person 
who has the right to drill into and pro- 
duce from a field or pool, or to appro- 
priate the production therefrom, or both, 
either for himself or for himself and 
others." 

Hist: Filed 6-20-55 as GMI 2. 

(42) "Period Allowable" shall mean 
the period as designated in which an 
allowable may be produced. 

(43) "Person" shall mean any natural 
person, partnership, corporation, asso- 
ciation, receiver, trustee, guardian, fidu- 
ciary, executor, administrator, represen- 
tative of any kind, or the State of Oregon 
and its political subdivisions. 

(44) "Pipe Line Oil" shall mean oil 
free from water and basic sediment to 
the degree that it is acceptable for 
pipe line transportation and refinery use. 

(45) Pool ' shall mean an underground 
4-1-61 3 



reservoir containing or appearing to con- 
tain a common accumulation of oil and 
natural gas. A zone of a structure which 
is completely separated from any other 
zone in the same structure is a pool. 

(46) "Potential" shall mean the com- 
puted daily ability of a well to produce 
oil as determined by a test made m con- 
formity with rules prescribed by the 
Board. 

(47) "Pressure Maintenance" shall 
mean (a) the reintroduction (in the early 
stages of field development) of gas or 
fluid produced from an oil or gas well to 
maintain the pressure of the reservoir; 
(b) the introduction of gas or fluid for 
the same purpose but obtained from an 
outside source. 

(48) "Producer" or "owner" shall 
mean a person who has the right to drill 
into and to produce from any pool and to 
appropriate the oil or gas he produces 
therefrom either for others, for hims elf 
or for himself and others. 

(49) "Product" shall mean any com- 
modity made from oil or gas, and shall 
include refined crude oil, crude tops, 
topped crude, processed crude petroleum, 
residue from crude petroleum, cracking 
stock, uncracked fuel oil, fuel oil, treated 
crude oil, residuum, gas oil, casing-head 
gasoline, natural gas, gasoline, kerosene, 
benzene, wash oil, v/aste oil, blended 
gasoline, lubricating oil, blends or mix- 
tures of oil with one or more liquid 
products or by-products derived from 
oil or gas, and blends or mixtures of 
two or more liquid products or by- 
products from oil or gas. 

(50) "Proved Oil or Gas Land" shall 
mean the area which has been shown by 
development or geological information to 
be such that additional wells drilled 
thereon are reasonably certain to be 
commercially productive of oil or gas, 
or both. 

(51) "Purchaser" shall mean any per- 
son who directly or indirectly purchases, 
transports, takes or otherwise removes 
production to his account from a well, 
wells, or pool. 

(52) "Recycle" - See Pressure Main- 
tenance. 

(53) "Repressure" - See Pressure 
Maintenance. 



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CH. 632 



OREGON ADMINIS TRATIVE RULES 



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(5-1) "Run" shall mean oil or gas 
piped from one place lo another. 

(55) "Separator" shall mean an ap- 
paratus for separating oil, gas, water, 
etc., with efficiency as it is produced. 

(56) "Share, Fair" shall mean that 
part of the authorized production for the 
pool which is substantially in the pro- 
portion that the quantity of recoverable 
oil and gas in the developed area of a 
tract in the pool bears to the recoverable 
oil and gas in the total developed area 
of the pool, insofar as these amounts 
can be practically ascertained. 

(57) "Shortage of Underage" shall mean 
the amount of production less than the 
allowable. 

(58) "Spacing Unit" shall mean the 
maximum area in a pool which may be 
efficiently and economically drained by 
one well. 

(59) "Storage" shall mean produced 
oil, gas, or both confined in tanks, res- 
ervoirs, or containers. 

(60) "Storage, Underground" shall 
mean underground cavities either natural 
or artificial or both which are suitable 
for storage of natural gas, produced 
petroleum, and petroleum products. The 
term may also mean the produced petro- 
leum and petroleum products confined 
in underground cavities. 

(61) "Survey" shall mean all tests made 
for the purpose of obtaining information 
concerning the productive possibility of 
any geological formation and shall in- 
clude electrical and directional surveys. 

(62) "Waste" in addition to its ordi- 
nary meaning, shall mean "physical 
waste as that term is generally under- 
stood in the petroleum industry. It in- 
cludes: 

(a) Underground waste and the ineffi- 
cient, excessive or improper use or 
dissipation of reservoir energy, includ- 
ing gas energy and water drive, of any 
pool; and the locating, spacing, drilling, 
equipping, operating or producing of any 
oil well or gas well in a manner which 
results or tends to result in reducing 
the quantity of oil or gas ultimately 
recoverable from any pool; 

(b) Surface waste and the inefficient 
storing of oil and the locating, spacing, 
drilling, equipping, operating or produc- 



ing of oil wells or gas wells in a 
manner causing or tending to cause un- 
necessary or excessive surface loss or 
dest mrtion of oil or fas. (1953 c 667, 
section 2.) 

(63) "Well" shall mean a well drilled 
in search of oil cr gas, but shall not 
include core test wells, stratigraphic 
test wells or wells drilled lor infor- 
mation purposes only as distinguished 
from wells drilled for the purpose of 
producing oil or gas if found. [ 1953 
c. 667 section 1] 

(64)"Well Log" shall mean the writ- 
ten record progressively describing the 
strata, water, oil or gas encountered in 
drilling a well with such additional in- 
formation as to give volumes, pressure, 
rate of fill-up, water depths, caving 
strata, casing record, etc., as is usually 
recorded in normal procedure of dril- 
ling, also to include electrical survey 
or logging. 

(65) "Wildcat Well" shall mean a 
drilling or producing well in an unproved 
area. 

(66) Additional definitions may be found 
in ORS 520.005 and 520.015. 

10-010 APPLICATION AND PERMIT 
TO DRILL, "Before any person shall 
spud in and begin the actual drilling 
of any well in search of oil or gas, 
such person shall file with the Board 
his application, in such iorm as the 
Board shall require for a permit to 
drill said well. The application shall be 
accompanied by the sum of $25.00, which 
sum is fixed as a fee for granting of 
a permit. When satisfied that the ap- 
plication and the bond are in confor- 
mance with law, the Board, shall issue 
a permit to the applicant, in such form 
as it may have established by its rules 
and regulations; and the number appear- 
ing upon such permit shall at all timis 
be conspicuously displayed on the der- 
rick used in drilling such well. 

As a further condition precedent to 
the granting of a permit for drilling any 
oil or gas well, the operator shall fur- 
nish a bond in the »um of $4,000, con- 
ditioned as provided by law und on a 
form supplied by the Board. The surety 
on the bond shall be a corporate surety 

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authorized to do business in t h e Slate 
of Oregon." (See ORS 520.025). 

Hist: Filed 6-20-55 as GMI 2. 

10-012 CHANGES OF LOCATION OR 
OWNERSHIP. (1) If, prior to the dril- 
ling of a well, the person to whom the 
permit was issued desires to change 
the location, he shall submit a letter 
so. stating and another application prop- 
erly filled out showing the new location. 
No additional fee is necessary, but dril- 
ling shall not be started until the trans- 
fer has been approved and the new per- 
mit posted at the new location. 

(2) If, while a well is drilling or after 
it has been completed, the person to 
whom the permit was issued disposes 
of his interest in the well, he shall sub- 
mit a written statement to the director 
setting forth the facts. 

(3) Before the transfer of any well, 
the person who is to acquire it must 
obtain a permit and post a bond as 
required by section 10-010. 

Hist: Filed 6-20-55 as GMI 2. 

-10-014 DRILLING PRACTICES. (1) 
Pits for Drill Cuttings: There shall 
be provided at every well before the 
actual drilling has been started, one or 
more pits of adequate and approved size 
for holding the drill cuttings removed 
from such well. 

(2) Casing and Sealing Off Formations: 
Each oil, gas, brine, or fresh-water 
stratum above the producing horizon shall 
be cased and sealed off to prevent effec- 
tively the migration of oil, gas, brine, 
or fresh water to other areas. Such 
casing and sealing off shall be effected 
and tested in such manner and by such 
methods and means as may be prescribed 
by the director. 

(3) Mud-laden Fluid to be Applied: 
No gas sand or stratum upon being pene-' 
trated shall be drilled or left open more 
than two days without the application of 
mud-laden fluid to prevent the escape of 
gas during further drilling in or through 
such sand stratum. 

(4) Well-Head Equipment: No well shall 
be drilled into any formation where oil or 
4-1-61 



gas under high pressure is expected to 
be found until the innermost strir.^ ol 
casing shall have been equipped w.t.. ;,n 
adequate high- pressure master ja'.« val- 
ve and blow-out preventer securely an- 
chored. 

(5) Well Records (Logs): During the 
drilling or deepening of every well, ex- 
clusive of stratigraphic test wells and/or 
holes drilled solely for the purpose of 
seismograph operations, the owner, ope r- 
ator, contractor, driller, or other person 
responsible for the conduct of drilling 
operations, shall keep at the well a de- 
tailed and accurate record of the well, 
reduced to writing from day to day, which 
shall be accessible to the director upon 
order of the Board at all reasonable 
times. A copy of the records shall be 
furnished to the director within 20 days 
after the completion or abandonment of 
any well, but shall be kept confidential 
for a period of two years from the date 
of filing with the director. 

(6) Deepening: Every person, owne r, or 
producer who desires to deepen a well 
to a depth below that to which it was orig- 
inally drilled shall file a written notice 
of intention to deepen. The notice shall 
set forth in detail the new proposed total 
depth, the plan for sealing off any oii, 
gas, brine, or fresh- water strata to be 
found or expected to be found in the deep- 
ening. If the method set forth is satis- 
factory and the person, owner, or pro- 
ducer is not in violation of the law or 
the rules of the Board, the director 
shall issue a deepening permit. The 
actual deepening shall not be started 
until the deepening permit has been posted 
at the well location. 

10-016 IDENTIFICATION OF WELLS. 

Hereafter, every person drilling f'">r 
oil or gas or operating, owning, or con- 
trolling or in possession of any well 
drilled for oil or gas, shall paint or 
stencil and post and keep posted in a 
conspicuous place near the well, the 
name of the person drilling, operating, 
owning, or controlling the well, the name 
of the lease, the number of the well, and 
the number of the permit for the well, 
together with the Section, Township, and 
Range. 



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10-018 ORGANIZATION REPORTS. Ev- 
ery person acting as principal or agent 
for another or independently- engaged in 
drilling for oil or gas or in the produc- 
tion, storage, reclaiming, treating, or 
processing of crude oil or natural gas 
produced in Oregon shall immediately 
file with the Board in the form of an 
affidavit: the name under which such 
business is being conducted or operated; 
the name and postoffice address of such 
person, the business or businesses in 
which he is engaged; the plan of organi- 
zation and, in case of a corporation, the 
law under which it is chartered and the 
name and postoffice addres-s of any per- 
son acting as a trustee, together with 
the name of the manager, agent, attorney- 
in-fact, or principal executive thereof, 
and the name and postoffice address of 
each officer thereof. In each case where 
such business is conducted under an 
assumed name, such report shall show 
the names and postoffice addresses of 
all owners in addition to the other infor- 
mation required and also the name of 
the county in which the certificate of 
assumed name is filed. Immediately af- 
ter any change occurs as to the facts 
stated in the report filed, a supplemen- 
tary report under oath shall be immedi- 
ately filed with the Board with respect to 
such change. 

Hist: Filed 6-20-55 as GMI 2. 

10-020 SURFACE EQUIPMENT. Meter 
fittings of adequate size to measure the 
gas efficiency for the purpose of obtain- 
ing gas-oil ratios shall be installed on 
the gas vent-line of every separator. 
Well-head equipment shall be installed 
and maintained in first-class condition 
so that static bottom hole pressure may 
be obtained at any time by the duly auth- 
orized agents of the Board or the direc- 
tor. Valves shall be installed so that 
pressures can be readily obtained on 
both casing and tubing. 

10-122 BLOW-OUT PREVENTION. In 
drilling in areas where high pressures 
are likely to exist, all proper and neces- 
sary precautions shall be taken for keep- 
ing the well under control, including the 



use of blow-out preventers and high- 
pressure fittings attached to casing 
strings properly anchored and cemented. 

10-124 DRILLING FLUID. At any time 
of drilling any well by rotary method, 
the operator shall continuously maintain 
in the hole, from top to bottom, good 
mud-laden fluid in accordance with rec- 
ognized safe practice. 

10-126 CLEANING WELLS. All wells 
shall be cleaned into a pit not less than 
one hundred fifty (150) feet from the 
derrick floor and one hundred fifty (150) 
feet from any fire hazard. 

10-128 BOILER OR LIGHT PLANT. No 
boiler or electric lighting generator shall 
be placed nearer than 100 feet to any 
producing well or oil tank. 

10-130 RUBBISH OR DEBRIS. Any rub- 
bish or debris that might constitute a 
fire hazard shall be removed to a dis- 
tance of at least 150 feet from the vicin- 
ity of wells, tanks, and pump stations. 
All waste shall be burned or disposed 
of in such manner as to avoid creating 
a fire hazard or polluting streams and 
fresh-water strata. 

10-132 TUBING. All wells shall be 
equipped with, and produce through, tubing 
of not more than three inches in diameter. 
The bottom of tubing on flowing wells 
shall not be higher than 100 feet above 
the top of the producing sand. If the 
tubing is perforated, the perforations 
shall not extend above the top of the 
producing horizon. Tubing shall be free 
from obstructions, and have orange-peel 
weld or bar on the bottom in order to 
permit the free entrance of bottom hole 
instruments. 

10-134 CHOKES. All flowing wells shall 
be equipped with chokes or beans ade- 
quate to control the flow thereof. 

10-136 SEPARATORS. All flowing wells 
must be produced through an approved 
oil and gas separator. 

10-138 FIRE WALLS. Every permanent 

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oil tank, or battery of tanks, must be 
surrounded by a dike or fire wall with 
a capacity of one and one-half times that 
of the tank or battery of tanks. 

10-140 SLUSH PITS TO BE FILLED 
IN. Slush pits at producing oil wells 
must be filled in within a reasonable 
time after the completion of the well. 

10-142 DEVIATION. Except by special 
permission of the Board the maximum 
point at which a well penetrates the pro- 
ducing formation shall not vary more than 
60 feet from the vertical drawn from the 
center of the hole at the surface for 
each 1,000 feet of depth. 

10-144 REPORT OF RESULT OF 
SHOOTING, PERFORATING OR TREAT- 
ING OF WELL. Within 30 days after 
either the shooting or chemical treat- 
ment of a well, a report shall be filed 
with the director by the owner, giving 
the condition of the well after shooting, 
perforating, or treating, the size and 
depth of the shot or amount of chemical 
used, the daily production of oil, gas, 
and water after shooting or chemical 
treatment, the name of the person rend- 
ering such service, and any other perti- 
nent information. Such report shall be 
signed and sworn to. 

10-146 VACUUM PUMPS PROHIBITED. 

The use of vacuum pumps or other de- 
vises for the purpose of putting a vacuum 
on any gas or oil-bearing stratum is 
prohibited, unless, upon application and 
hearing, and for good cause shown, the 
Board shall permit the use of vacuum 
pumps. 

10-148 PRODUCTION PRACTICE. Nat- 
urally flowing wells shall be produced 
at a continuous uniform rate as far as 
is practical, in keeping with the current 
allowable, unless the Board specifically 
permits stop-cocking to reduce the gas- 
oil ratio. 

10-150 PULLING OUTSIDE STRINGS 
OF CASING. In pulling outside strings 
of casing from any oil or gas well, the 
space outside the casing left in the hole 
4-1-61 7 



shall immediately be filled, and shall at 
all times be kept full of mud-laden 
fluid of adequate specific gravity to seal 
off all fresh and salt water strata and 
any strata bearing oil or gas which is 
not producing. 

10-151 NOTIFICATION OF FIRE 
BREAKS, LEAKS, OR BLOW-OUTS. (1) 
All persons controlling or operating any 
oil and gas wells, or receiving tanks, 
storage tanks, or receiving and storage 
receptacles into which crude oil is pro'- 
duced, received, or stored, shall im- 
mediately notify the Board by letter 
giving full details concerning all fires 
which occur at such oil or gas wells 
or tanks or receptacles on their prop- 
erty, and all such persons shall im- 
mediately report all tanks or recep- 
tacles struck by lightning and any other 
fire which destroys oil or gas, and shall 
immediately report any breaks in or 
from tanks or receptacles and pipe lines 
from which oil or gas is escaping or 
has escaped. 

In all such reports of fires, breaks, 
leaks, or escapes, or other accidents of 
this nature, the location of the well, tank 
receptacle, or line break shall be given 
by Section, Township, Range, and prop- 
erty so that the exact location thereof 
can be readily located on the ground. 
Such report shall likewise specify what 
steps have been taken or are in progress 
to remedy the situation reported' and 
shall detail the quantity of oil or gas 
lost, destroyed, or permitted to escape. 
In case any tank or receptacle is 
permitted to run over, the escape thus 
occurring shall be reported as in the 
case of a leak. The report hereby re- 
quired as to oil losses shall be neces- 
sary only in case such oil loss exceeds 
five barrels in the aggregate. 

10-152 PRODUCING FROM DIFFERENT 
STRATA THROUGH THE SAME CASING 
STRING. No well shall be permitted to 
produce either oil or gas from different 
strata through the same string of casing 
without first applying for a hearing be- 
fore the Board. The operator requesting 
Buch permission must present to tin- 
Board full and complete facts relative 



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CH. 632 



OREGON ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 



to the operation and the reasons for re- 
questing such permission. If a stratum 
should be encountered bearing either 
oil or gas and it is desired to drill 
deeper, the iltratum first penetrated and 
likewise each and every formation in 
turn shall be closed and sealed off to 
prevent waste, either surface or under- 
ground. 

10-154 DETERMINING AND NAMING 
POOLS. Wells shall be classified as to 
the pool from which they produce and 
pools shall be determined and named by 
the director, provided, that in the event 
any person is dissatisfied with any such 
classification, an application maybemade 
to the Board for such classificationas the 
applicant deems proper, and the Board 
will hear and determine the same. 

10-156 SPACING UNITS. Immediately 
upon the discovery of any pool or at 
any time after the effective date of this 
rule, the Board may prescribe spacing 
units for each pool and specify the size, 
shape, and location thereof. 

10-158 LOCATION AND SPACING OF 
WELLS. (1) Spacing Plan: Unless a dif- 
ferent well- spacing plan is adopted the 
director will, simultaneously with the 
establishment of spacing units for each 
pool, prescribe well-spacing plans there- 
for, the boundaries of which shall coin- 
cide, if possible, with the boundaries of 
such spacing units, which plan shall re- 
quire a minimum of a 40 acre spacing 
unless a different spacing shall be re- 
quired or approved by the Board. 

(2) Location of Well: Each well per- 
mitted to be drilled upon any spacing 
unit shall be drilled approximately in 
the center thereof with such exceptions 
as may be reasonably necessary where 
it is shown, after notice and upon hear- 
ing, and the Board finds, that the unit 
as established is partly outside the pool, 
where it is partly nonproductive, or, 
that for some other reason, a well ap- 
proximately in the center of the unit would 
be nonproductive, or topographical con- 
ditions are such as to make the drilling 
in the center of the unit unduly burden- 
some. 



(3) Exceptions'. Whenever a uniform 
spacing plan has been prescribed for any 
pool exceptions thereto may be permitted 
if the Board finds, after notice and hear- 
ing, that conditions within such pool are 
such that reasonably uniform spacing 
would be impracticable. 

10-160 POOLING OF SMALL TRACTS. 

When two or more separately owned 
tracts of land are embraced within a 
spacing unit which has been established 
by the Board, the owners thereof may 
pool their interests and develop their 
lands as a unit. Where, however, such 
owners have not agreed to pool their 
interests, the Board, for the prevention 
of waste or to protect correlative rights, 
may limit the allowable of each such 
owner to his reasonable prorata share 
of production from such spacing unit. 

10-162 ILLEGAL PRODUCTION. 

No purchaser, producer, operator or 
any other person shall produce any crude 
oil, natural gas, or waste oil from any 
spacing unit or pool in this State except 
in accordance with the rules, regulations 
and orders of the Board: Provided that 
tank splitting shall not be required. 

10-164 COMMINGLING OF PRODUC- 
TION PROHIBITED. The production from 
one pool shall not be commingled with 
that from another pool in the same field 
before delivery to a purchaser, unless 
otherwise ordered by the Board. 

10-166 REPORTS BY PURCHASERS 
AND PRODUCERS. (1) Purchasers: Each 
purchaser or taker of any oil or gas from 
any well, lease, or pool shall on or be- 
fore the 25th day of each month succeed- 
ing the month in which the purchasing or 
taking occurs, file with the director on a 
form furnished by the Board, a verified 
statement of all oil or gas purchased, 
or taken from any such well, lease, or 
pool during the preceding month. 

(2) Producers: The producer or oper- 
ator of each and every well or spacing 
unit in prorated pools shall each month 
submit to the director a sworn statement 
showing the amount of production made 
by each well and by each such spacing 

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CH. 632 



unit upon forms furnished therefor. 

.10-168 USE OF EARTHEN RESER- 
VOIRS. Oil shall not be stored or retained 
in earthen reservoirs or in open recep- 
tacles. 

■ 10-170 RESERVOIR SURVEYS. By spec- 
ial order of the Board, periodic surveys 
may be made of the reservoirs in this 
State containing oil and gas. These sur- 
veys will be thorough and .complete and 
shall be made under the supervision of 
the petroleum and natural gas engineers 
of the Board. The condition of the res- 
ervoirs containing oil and gas and the 
practices and methods employed by the 
operators shall be investigated. The vol- 
ume and source of crude oil and natural 
gas; the reservoir pressure of the reser- 
voir as an average; the areas of regional 
or differential pressure; stabilized gas- 
oil ratios; and the producing character- 
istics of the field as a whole and the indi- 
vidual wells within the field shall be 
specifically included. 

10-172 OPERATORS TO ASSIST IN RES- 
ERVOIR SURVEYS. All operators of oil 
wells are required to permit and assist 
the agents of the Board and the director 
in making any and all tests including 
bottom hole pressure and gas-oil ratio 
determinations that may be required by 
the Board or director on any or all of 
their wells. 

10-174 MEASUREMENT OF POTEN- 
TIAL OPEN-FLOW OF GAS WELLS. 

The potential open-flow of a gas well 
may be ascertained by U.S. Bureau of 
Mines back pressure method, or by oth- 
er approved methods. 

10-176 SUPERVISION OF OPEN-FLOW 
AND PRESSURE TESTS. All tests made in 
determining the potential flow and shut- 
in well-head or bottom hole pressure of 
a gas well and used in calculating the al- 
lowable of the spacing unit which the well 
is located shall be made under the super- 
vision of representatives of the Board. 

10-178 DURATION OF TESTS. The tests 
for open-flow and pressure of gas wells 
4-1-61 o 



shall be made at such intervals and shall 
continue for such time as may be neces- 
sary to effect accurate determination, and 
in the case of pressure tests the shut- 
in period shall be not less than 24 hours. 

10-180 NOTICE OF TESTS. Open-flow 
and pressure tests of gas wells may be 
witnessed or observed by a representative 
of any producer in the field, and the 
owners of the adjoining or offset leases 
must be notified by the owner of the well 
on which the test is to be taken, stating 
the time when such test will commenced 

10-182 GAS TO BE METERED. (1) Me- 
ters: All gas when produced or sold shall 
be metered with an approved meter of 
sufficient capacity, provided that gas may 
be metered from a lease or unitized 
property as a whole if it is shown that 
ratable taking can be maintained; pro- 
vided that meters shall not be required 
for gas produced and used on the lease 
for development purposes and lease oper- 
ations. 

(2) Meter Charts and Records: Pur- 
chasers shall keep meter charts and 
records on gas purchased in a perma- 
nent file, for a period of at least two 
years, and such information shall be 
made available to the Board and director. 

(3) By-Passes: By-passes shall not be 
connected around meters in such manner 
as to permit the improper taking of gas. 

10-184 DIRECT WELL PRESSURE. The 
use of direct well pressure to operate any 
machinery is hereby prohibited. 

10-186 GAS-OIL RATIO. No well shall 
be permitted to produce gas in excess 
of the maximum ratio determined for a 
pool unless all gas produced in excess 
thereof is returned to the pool from 
which it was produced. 

10-188 GAS-OIL RATIO SURVEYS AND 
REPORTS. Gas-oil ratios and surveys 
shall be taken in the manner prescribed 
by the Board for individual fields where 
upon gas-oil ratio limits have been fixed 
and in accordance with the rules pre- 
scribed for each individual pool. 

(1) Flowing Wells Intermittently (Stop- 



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CH. 63?. 



OREGON ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 



cocked) Produced: In computing the ope r- 
atinf! •eas-oil ratio the total volume of 
gas and the total barrels of oil that are 
produced in order to obtain the daily 
oil allowable must be used regardless 
of the flowing time in the 24-hour period. 

(2) Gas Lift or Jet Wells: The total 
volume of gas to be used in computing the 
operating gas-oil ratio is the total out- 
put volume minus the total input volume, 

(3) Pumping Wells: Should gas be with- 
drawn from the casing in an attempt to 
maintain a fluid seal, or for any other 
reason, this volume of gas must be added 
to the' gas produced through tubing in 
computing the gas-oil ratio. 

10-190 GAS UTILIZATION. After the 
expiration of two days from the time of 
encountering gas in a gas well, no gas 
from such well shall be permitted to es- 
cape into the air, and no gas produced 
therefrom shall be utilized except for 
domestic or commercial purposes. 

10-192 DISPOSAL OF BRINE OR SALT 
WATER. In addition to the requirement 
of the Act to prevent the escape of oil or 
gas out of one stratum to another and. to 
prevent the pollution of fresh water sup- 
plies by oil, gas, or salt water, and in 
addition to any regulations of the State 
Sanitary Authority, the following condi- 
tions shall control the disposal of brine 
or salt water liquids, and any other means 
or methods of disposal, except re-injec- 
tion into the formation, are hereby pro- 
hibited: (1) Disposal inEarthenPits: Brine 
or salt water may be disposed of by 
evaporation when impounded in excavated 
earthen pits, which may be used for such 
purpose only when the pit is underlaid 
by tight soil such as heavy clay or hard- 
pan. 

Impounding of brine or salt water in 
earthen pits that are porous and closely 
underlaid by a gravel or sand stratum 
hereby is prohibited. Earthen pits used 
for impounding brine or salt water shall 
be so constructed and maintained as to 
prevent the escape of fluid. 

The Board shall have authority to 
condemn any pit which does not proper- 
ly impound such water and order the 
disposal of such water into an under- 



ground formation, as herein provided. 

The level of brine or salt water in 
earthen pits shall at no time be per- 
mitted to rise above the lowest point 
of the ground surface level. All pits 
shall have a continuous embankment sur- 
rounding them sufficiently above the level 
of the surface to prevent surface water 
from running into the pit. Such embank- 
ment shall not be used to impound brine 
or salt water. 

At no time shall brine or salt water 
impounded in earthen pits be allowed to 
escape over adjacent or into streams. 

(2) Disposal by Injection: Salt water 
may also be disposed of by injection 
into the strata from which produced or 
other proved salt water bearing strata. 

10-194 WATER INJECTION AND WA- 
TER FLOODING OF OIL AND GAS PROP- 
ERTIES. (1) Application and Approval: 
The owner or operator of any well may 
inject water under pressure into the for- 
mation containing oil or gas for the pur- 
pose of obtaining oil or gas from the res- 
ervoir, upon application to and approval 
by the Board. 

(2) Casing and Cement: Wells used for 
the injection of water into the producing 
formation or repressuring wells shall 
be cased with sound casing so as not to 
permit leakage and the casing cemented 
in such manner that damage will not be 
caused to oil, gas, or fresh water re- 
sources. 

(3) Application, Contents, Notice, Ob- 
jection, Hearing, and Approval: (a) No 
water injection or water flooding program 
shall be instituted until it has been regu- 
larly authorized by the Board. 

(b) The application therelor shall be 
verified and filed with the Board, show- 
ing: 

(A) The location of the intake well. 

(B) The location of all oil and gas wells, 
including abandoned and drilling wells and 
dry holes, and the name of landowners 
and lessees within one-half mile of the 
intake well. 

(C) The formations from which wells 
are producing or have produced. 

(D) The name, description, and 'lepth 
of the formations to be flooded 

(E) The depths of each formation into 
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CH. 632 



which water is to be injected. 

(F) The elevations of the top of the oil 
qr gas bearing formation in. the intake 
well ar.d the wells producing from the 
same formation within one-half mile ra- 
dius of the intake well. 

(G) Log of the intake well or similar 
information as is available. 

(H) Description of the intake well cas- 
ing. 

(I) Description of the liquid, stating 
the kind, where obtained, and the esti- 
mated amounts to be injected daily. 

(J) The names and addresses of the 
operators. 

(K) Such other information as the Board 
may require to ascertain whether the 
flooding may be safely and legally made. 

(c) Applications may be made to in- 
clude the use of more than one intake 
well on the same lease, or on more than 
one lease. 

(d) Applications shall be executed by 
all operators who are to participate in 
the proposed water injection or water 
flooding plan. 

(e) No order approving water injection 
or water flooding of oil properties shall 
be issued until after notice has been given 
by the Board to each operator in such 
pool, and hearing has been had before 
the Board. 

(4) Notice of Commencement and Dis- 
continuance of Water Injection or Water 
Flooding Operations: 

(a) Immediately upon the commence- 
ment of water injection or water flooding 
operations, the applicant shall notify the 
Board stating the date of commencement. 

(b) Within 10 days after the discontin- 
uance, of water injection or water flooding 
operations the applicant or the one in 
charge thereof shall notify the Board of 
the date of such discontinuance and the 
reasons therefor. 

(c) Before any intake well shall be 
abandoned, notice shall be served on the 
Board, and the same procedure shall be 
followed in the plugging of such well as 
provided for the plugging of oil and gas 
wells. 

(5) Records: The owner or operator of 
an intake well shall keep an accurate 
record of (a) the amount of water injected 
into the intake wells, (b) the total amount 

4-1-61 11 



of water produced, and (c) the total amount 
of oil produced from the area flooded. 
Such information shall be made available 
to the Board or its agents. 

10-196 GAS INJECTION OF OIL AND 
GAS PROPERTIES. (1) Application and 
Approval: The owner or operator of any 
well may inject gas under pressure into 
the formation containing oil or gas for 
the purpose of obtaining oil or gas from 
the reservoir, upon application to and 
approval by the Board. 

(2) Casing and Cement: Wells used for 
the injection of gas into the producing 
formation shall be cased with sound casing 
so as not to pe rmit leakage and the casing 
cemented in a manner that damage will not 
be caused to oil, gas, or fresh water 
resources. 

(3) Application, Contents, Notice, Ob- 
jection, Hearing and Approval: (a) No 
gas shall be injected into a well for gas 
injection purposes until so ordered by the 
Board pursuant to application and notice 
as herein required. 

(b) The application shall be verified and 
filed with the Board showing: 

(A) The location of the intake well. 

(B) The location of all oil and gas 
wells, including abandoned and drilling 
wells and dry holes, and the name of 
landowners and lessees within one-half 
mile of the intake well. 

(C) The formations from which wells 
are producing or have produced. 

(D) The name, description, and depth 
of the formations to be injected. 

(E) The depths of each formation into 
which gas is to be injected. 

(F) The elevations of the top of the 
oil or gas bearing formation in the in- 
take well and the wells producing from the 
same formation within one-half mile of 
the intake well. 

(G) The log of the intake well, or simi- 
lar information as is available. 

(H) Description of the intake well cas- 
ing. 

(I) Description of the gas, stating the 
kind, where obtained, and the estimated 
amounts to be injected daily. 

(J) The names and addresses of the 
operators. 

(K) Such other information as the Board 



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CH. 632 



OREGON ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 



may require to ascertain whether the 
^as injection plan meets the require- 
ments of the law and safety. 

(c) Applications may be made to include 
the use of more than one intake well on 
the same lease or on more than one lease. 

(d) Applications shall be executed by 
all operators who are to participate in 
the proposed gas injection plan. 

(4) Notice of Commencement and Dis- 
continuance of Gas Injection: (a) Immed- 
iately upon commencement of gas injec- 
tion operations, the applicant shall noti- 
fy the Board stating the date of commence- 
ment. 

(b) Within 10 days after the discontin- 
uance of gas injection operations, the 
applicant or the one in charge of the 
operations shall notify the Board of the 
date of discontinuance and the reasons 
therefor. 

(c) Before any intake well shall be 
abandoned, notice shall be served on the 
Board and the same procedure shall be 
followed in the plugging of such well as 
provided for the plugging of oil and gas 
wells. 

(5) Records: The owner or operator 
of the gas injection project shall keep 
an accurate record of (a) the amount of 
gas injected into the intake wells, (b) the 
amount of gas produced and (c) the amount 
of oil produced from leases affected by the 
gas injection. Such information shall be 
made available to the Board or its agents. 

10-198 ABANDONMENT, UNLAWFUL 
ABANDONMENT, SUSPENSION, WELL 
PLUGGING. (1) Oil, Gas, and Water to 
be Protected: Before any well or any 
producing horizon encountered therein 
shall be abandoned, the owner or oper- 
ator shall use such means, methods, and 
procedure as may be necessary to pre- 
vent water from entering any oil or gas- 
bearing formation, and to protect any 
underground or surface water that is 
suitable for domestic or irrigation pur- 
poses from waste, downward drainage, 
harmful infiltration and addition of de- 
leterious substances. 

The operator of any hole drilled for 
oil and gas which penetrates a usable 
fresh-water horizon, except those drilled 
for the purposes of seismic prospecting. 



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shall be required to set casing through 
this formation and cement such rasing 
from top to bottom, unless special ex- 
ception is granted by the Board. 

(2) Suspension: Removal of Equipment: 
Application: Extension: The Board may 
authorize a permittee to suspend opera- 
tions or remove equipment from a well 
for the period stated in the Board's 
written authorization, given upon writ- 
ten application of the permittee and his 
or its affidavit showing good cause. The 
period of suspension may be extended by 
the Board, upon written application made 
before expiration of the previously auth- 
orized suspension, accompanied by affi- 
davit of the permittee showing good cause 
for the granting of such extension. 

(3) Abandonment: Notice of Intention: 
Presumptions: (a) Before any work is 
commenced to abandon any well drilled 
for oil or gas, the permittee shall give 
written notice to the Board of his inten- 
tion< to abandon such well. The notice 
shall be upon forms supplied by the 
Board and shall contain the permit numb e r 
of the well and such other information as 
reasonably may be required by the Board. 

(b) After operations on or at a well 
have been suspended with the approval 
of the Board pursuant to subsection (2) 
of this rule, if operations are not resumed 
within six months from the date speci- 
fied in such approval of suspension, an 
intention to abandon and unlawful aband- 
onment shall be presumed unless the per- 
mittee has obtained from the Board an 
extension of time of such suspension, 
upon his or its written application and 
affidavit showing good cause for the 
granting of such extension. 

(c) Whenever operations on or at any 
well shall have been suspended for a 
period of six months without compliance 
with these regulations, the well shall 
be presumed unlawfully abandoned. 

(d) A well shall be deemed unlawfully 
abandoned if, without notice given to the 
Board as required by these rules, any 
drilling or producing equipment is re- 
moved. 

(e) Any unlawful abandonment under 
these regulations shall be declared by 
the Board and such declaration of aband- 
onment shall be entered in the Board 

4-1 (.1 



2-56 



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DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY A ND MI NERAL IN DUSTRIES C H . 632 



minutes and written notice the roof mailed 
by registered mail both to such pe rmittee 
at his last known post office address as 
disclosed by the records of the Board 
and to the permittee's surety; and the 
Board may thereafter proceed againstthe 
permittee and his or its surety. 

(f) All wells abandoned or declared 
abandoned as herein provided shall be 
plugged as required by law and by these 
regulations. 

(g) The bond furnished by permittee 
shall not be released until ajl procedures 
required by these regulations shall have 
been completed and the Board in writing 
shall have authorized such release. 

(4) Plugging Methods and Procedure: 
The methods and procedure for plugging 
a well shall be as follows: (a) The bot- 
tom of the hole shall be filled to the top 
of each producing formation, or a bridge 
shall be. placed at the top of each pro- 
ducing formation, and in either event a 
cement plug not less than 15 feet in 
length shall be placed immediately above 
each producing formation whenever pos- 
sible. 

(b) A cement plug not less than 15 feet 
in length shall be placed approximately 
50 feet below all freshwater bearing 
strata. 

(c) A plug shall be placed at the sur- 
face of the ground in each hole plugged 
in such manner as not to interfere with 
soil cultivation. 

(d) The interval between plugs shall 
be filled with an approved heavy mud- 
laden fluid. 

(e) The operator shall have the option 
as to the method of placing cement in 
the hole by (A) dump bailer, (B) pumping 
through tubing, (C) pump and plug, or 
(D) other method approved by the Board. 

(5) Affidavit on Completion: Copies: 
Within 20 days after the plugging of any 
well has been accomplished, the owner 
or operator thereof shall file an affidavit 
with the director setting forth in detail 
the method used in plugging the well. 
Such affidavit shall be made on a form 
supplied by the Board. Copies of well- 



plugging records and affidavits filed, ex- 
cept those relating to core drilling and 
seismic or other wells drilled for geo- 
logical data, will be furnished to anyone 
requesting them on payment of 50 cents 
per copy. 

(6) Seismic Core and Other Explora- 
tory Holes, to be Plugged: Methods: Affi- 
davit: Before abandoning any hole drilled 
for seismic, core, or other exploratory 
purposes, which hole penetrates a jsable 
fresh-water horizon, it shall be the duty 
of the owner or driller of such hole to 
plug the same in such manner as to pro- 
tect properly all water-bearing forma- 
tions; and within 60 days after the plug- 
ging, an affidavit shall be filed with the 
Director by the owner or driller, set- 
ting forth the location of the holes and 
the method used in plugging the same 
to protect water-bearing formations. 

(7) Wells Used for Fresh Water: (a) 
When the drilled well to be plugged may 
safely be used as a fresh-water well and 
such use is desired by the land owner, 
the well need not be filled above the re- 
quired sealing plug set belowfresh water; 
provided, however, authorization for use 
of any such well shall be obtained from 
the State Engineer, in conformance with 
chapter 708, Oregon Laws 1955. 

(b) Application for leaving the well par- 
tially unplugged as a fresh- water well 
may be made to the Board by the land 
owner, accompanied by his affidavit as 
to his need of water and the intended 
use of the well, together with certified 
copy of the State Engineer's order or 
permit, or that officer's statement that 
no permit is required. 

(c) The operator shall leave the fresh- 
water well in a condition approved by 
the Board. 

Hist: Filed 4-3-56 as GMI 3. 

10-200 CONFIDENTIAL INFORMA- 
TION. No information herein required 
to be furnished to the Board shall be dis- 
closed by any employee of the Board ex- 
cept as expressly authorizedby theBoard. 



4-1-61 



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APPENDIX II-K 

SPECIAL CONDITIONS TO APPLY TO 

ALL DEEP WELL EXPLORATORY 

DRILLING IN OREGON 

Departments of Environmental Quality 
and Geology and Mineral Industires 



Z31 






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Suite of Oregon 
DEPARTMENT Of ENVIRONMENTAL QUAUTY. INTEROmcT MCMO 



, Mr. R. E. Corcoran, State Geologist 
To: Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Do,t ' : September 2, 1975 

From: Mr - Loren Kramer, Director ~~^ ) /<L— 
Department of Environmental CiSlity 

Subject: SPECIAL COfipjJIOnS TO APP LY TO ALL DEEP WELL EXPLORATORY DRILLING IN 
OR ECO N 



1. If a geo thermal , mineral or petroleum resource of commercial interest 
is discovered, no drilling of additional wells or operations in 
connection therewith shall commence until an Environmental Impact 
Statement has been prepared for utilizing and developing the resource. 

2. Prior to commencement of any drilling activities where drilling death 
is expected to be in excess of 1,000 feet, detailed plans and 
specifications shall be submitted to and approved by the Department 

of Environmental Quality for collection and disposal of drill cuttings 
and mud, and other potential waste materials. 

3. A contingency plan shall be submitted to the Department of Geology 
and Mineral Industries prior to any deep well drilling activities 
outlining the following information procedures. 

a. Measures taken to prevent emergency conditions or- unplanned 

b. A description of preventive facilities to contain or treat 
unplanned discharges. 

c. The reporting system to be used to alert facility management 
and appropriate legal authorities. 

d. A list of personnel and equipment available to respond to 
emergency conditions. 

4. Upon determination of the Director of the Department of Environmental 
Quality or the Director of the Department of Geology and Mineral 
Industries that any activities conducted by the permittee in relation 
to its drilling operations or activities may tend to or will cause 
damage, hazards, pollution or risk to the environment of Oregon or 
may violate any conditions of permits issued by the aforementioned 
departments, the permittee shall when notified either orally or in 
writing by the Director of either department immediately cease and 
desist its drilling operations or activities until the problem has 
been corrected. 

5. All drilling processes and all waste mud and waste waters collection, 
treatment and disposal facilities shall be operated and maintained 

at all times in a manner which will prevent a direct discharge or 
indirect discharge of any waste mud and waste waters to the waters 
of the state. 



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Mr. R. E. Corcoran 
September 2, 1975 
age. 2 



6. All waste mud and waste waters are to be discharged into self-' 
contained, non-overflow holding ponds. 

7. All access roads', trails, drainage systems and the drilling site shall 
be constructed and maintained to minimize soil disturbances, control 
erosion and prevent channeling. 

8. All refuse shall be disposed of at a refuse site which has a valid 
permit from the Department of Environmental Quality. 

9. No geothermal waters, mineralized waters, oily waters or other waters 
or substances which might cause the Hater Quality Standards of the 
State of Oregon to be violated shall be discharged or otherwise 

- allowed to reach any of the waters of the state'unless a permit for 
the discharge has been issued by the Department of Environmental 

10. Sanitary wastes shall be disposed of in chemical or gas fired toilet 
facilities winch have been installed in accordance with the recom- 
mendations of the Department and the local county health department 
or by other approved means. 

11. In the event a breakdown of equipment or facilities causes a 
violation of any of the conditions of this permit or results in any 
unauthorized discharge, the permittee shall: 

a. Immediately take action to stop, contain and clean up the 
unauthorized discharges and correct the problem. 

b. Immediately notify the Department of Environmental Quality and 
the Department of Geology and Mineral Industries so that an 
investigation can be made to evaluate the impact and the 
corrective actions taken and determine additional action that 
must be taken. 

c. Submit a detailed written report describing the breakdown the 
actual quantity and quality of resulting waste discharges 
corrective action taken, steps taken to prevent a recurrence 
and any other pertinent information. 

Compliance with these requirements does not relieve the permittee 
from responsibility to maintain continuous compliance with the 
conditions of this permit or. the resulting liability for failure to 

12. Authorized representatives of the Department of Environmental 

■ Quality or the Department of Geology and Mineral Industries shall be 
permitted access to the premises of all facilities owned and operated 
by the permittee at all reasonable times for the purpose of making 
inspections, surveys collecting samples, obtaining data and carrying 
out other necessary functions related to this permit. 



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APPENDIX III 



MAPS OF SPECIFIC FEDERAL LAND LOCATIONS OF OIL AND GAS LEASE 
APPLICATIONS ON THE COOS BAY DISTRICT 



10 



/?9 



/■ 



\N 



LOON LAKE AREA (I of 2) 

OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 







ifl 



OIL 5 GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 



ROADS 
STREAMS 



I 



ti± 



/Z/ON 



LOON LAKE AREA (2 of 2) 
,^ OIL & GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 



/?9 *v 




>?/0 N 



LEGEND 



s 



Mm 



OIL & GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



SCALE: 1" - 1 Mile 

{ 1 ROADS 

Cd_ STREAMS 



/?<? N 



%+<* 





D 


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CALLAHAN AREA 

OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 




JZ9 w 



LEGEND 



s 



OIL & GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

COOS BAY DISTRICT LEASE 
APPLICATIONS IN ROSEBURG DISTRICT 
EAR (FEDERAL LAND) 



SCALE: : 



ROADS 
STREAMS 



1 Mile 



r 

s 



s 



U7 



COQUILLE RIVER AREA (1 of 5) 
OIL $ GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 




SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 



LEGEND 



.■■'■■ ■ ■ . 



OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



ROADS 



tM 



/€ SO H/ 



^8W 



I 



m 




Z/ow 



/ZftV 



LEGEND 



OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

COOS BAY DIST. LEASE 
APPLICATIONS IN ROSEBURG 
DISTRICT EAR (FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 

ROADS 

STREAMS 



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COQUILLE RIVER AREA (3 of 5) 
rqW OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 




SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 



LEGEND 






OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



ROADS 
STREAMS 



ISO 



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tf.fi • ■. ' 



/MOW 



COQUILLE RIVER AREA (4 o£ 5) 
OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS s 

••^- ^'l, i ■ mmm jmmsmm^- 




SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 



LEGEND 



H 



XI OIL & GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
CFEDERAL LAND) 

COOS BAY DISTRICT LEASE 
APPLICATIONS IN ROSEBURG 
DISTRICT EAR (FEDERAL LAND) 






ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 
ROADS 



zs~( 



COQUILLE RIVER AREA (5 of 5) 

SOIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS [ Ti ■ **H. 

'siMmssmnmiML \„ — mm _ _. 




SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 



LEGEND 



OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



ZZ. ROADS 
STREAMS 



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APPENDIX IV 



LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS OF OIL AND GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
ON THE COOS BAY DISTRICT 



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Form 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4-954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 

Oil and Gas Act of February 25, 1920 

(41 Stat. 437, 30 USC sec. 181) 



File Code Serial Number 



3111 A 



OR 9756 



Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 

mJ&tMiJtibbkki&kkkkk 
UklkUMWtlhUlbtMU 

P.O. Box 5444, Terminal Annex 
Denver, CO 80217 



Description of Land 

T. 23 S., R. 9 W. , W.M. , Oregon 
Sec. 12: SW%SW% 



13: Lots 1 through 13, inclusive, 16, 17 and 18, 

S%SW%, NW^SW^, SW%SE% 
14: Lots 9 through 16, inclusive, S% 
23: Nh 



Douglas County 
1752.82 acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



ACTION TAKEN 



August 4, 1972 



Application received, bkl 



Z£$ 



Form 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4-954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 


File Code 


S erial Number 




Oil and Gas Act of February 25, 1920 

(41 Stat. 437, 30 USC sec. 181) 


3111 A 


OR 9757 




Name and Mailing Address 






Mobil Oil Corporation 

mtwm/nmt/mkkt. 

P.O. Box 5444, Terminal Annex 






Denver, CO 80217 






Description of Land 






T. 23 S., R. 9 W. , W.M. , Oregon 

Sec. 15: Lots 9 through 16, inclusive, S^ 
16: All 


Douglas County 
2225.53 acres 




22: All 






DATE OF ACTION 


ACTION TAKEN 






August 4, 1972 


Application received, bkl 







I 
I 



Form 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 


File Code 


Serial Number 


Oil and Gas Act of February 25, 1920 

(41 Stat. 437, 30 USC sec. 181) 


3111 A 


OR 9758 


Name and Mailing Address 




Mobil Oil Corporation 

P.O. Box 5444, Terminal Annex 




Denver, CO 80217 




Description of Land 




T. 23 S., R. 9 W. , W.M. , Oregon 
Sec. 8: All 
9: All 


Douglas County 
2210.49 acres 


10: All 




17: All 




DATE OF ACTION 


ACTION TAKEN 


August 4, 1972 


Application received, bkl 





Fonr. 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 

Oil and Gas Act of February 25, 1920 

(41 Stat. 437, 30 USC sec. 181) 



File Code 



3111 A 



S erial Number 



OR 9759 



Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 

H& Wg&&iJ FN I Nmt 

P.O. Box 5444, Terminal Annex 
Denver, CO 80217 



Description of Land 

T. 23 S., R. 9 W. , W.M., Oregon 



Sec. 18 
19 
30 



Lots 1 and 2, NEfc, E^W%, N%SE%, SW^SE^ 
Lots 3 and 4, SE*s, E%SW% 
NE%, NE^SE?*, ShSlh, SE^SW^ 



Douglas County 
1718.20 acres 



T. 23 S., R. 10 W. , W.M., Oregon 
Sec. 35: All 



DATE OF ACTION 



ACTION TAKEN 



August 4, 1972 



Application received, bkl 



LS? 





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O 



Oil and Gas Act of February 25, 1920 

(41 Stat. 437, 30 USG sec, 181) 3111 A 



Kobtl Oil Corporation 
612 South Flower Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90051 




T. 23 S„, R. 9 W., W. M., Oregon 
Sec. 20s N%N%, S% 
21 t Ail 
27j All 
28* Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, NEfc, 

29: All 



Douglas County 
2377.41 Acres 



August 4, 1972 Application received, faw 



I 



Roseburg(2)- 

GS(2) 

File 



?£f 



Form 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4-954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 

Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 



File Code Serial Number 



3111 A 



OR 13304 



Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 
612 So. Flower Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Land Dept 



Description of Land 



J. Land resetted: State Oregon County COOS £• Douglas T. 29 S.- R- 9 W. : Meridian] 

Willamette 



Section 23 
Section 27 
Section 31 
Section 33 
Section 35 



W/2; W/2 NEA; NEA NEA; NWA SEA. 

N/2; N/2 S/2; S/2 SWA. 

SWA NEA; SEA NW/4; and Govt. Lots I, 2 and 3. 

N/2; N/2 S/2; SEA SWA; SWA SEA. 

S/2; SWA NWA; SEA NEA. 



ToUl Area 2225 . 58 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



ACTION TAKEN 



August 30, 19 74 



Application reed. f aw 



ZkO, 



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(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



Legal Reference 

Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Name and Mailing Address 



File Code 



3111 A 



Serial Number 



OH 13308 



Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept. 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Description of Land 



2. L»nd r«iue»tMj: State Oregon County CoOS £• Douglas T. 29 S.: R-9 W. : Meridian 

Willamette 
Section 13: NEA; S/2 NWA; W/2 SWA. ... 

Section 15: All. 
. Section 17: W/2 SWA; NEA SWA; S/2 SEA; NEA SEA; S/2 NEA; SEA NW/4; 
and Govt. Lots 1 and 2. ..... 

Section 21: Al 1. . " 

Section 29: N/2 NEA; SEA NEA; NEA SEA; NEA NWA. 



Total Are» 2247.62 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 1974 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application reed. f aw 



214,/ 



Form 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4-954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 

Act of February 25, 19 20; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 



File Code 



3111 A 



S erial Number 



ORI330S 



Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept. 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Description of Land 



Z. Land requested: State Oregon County COOS & Douglas T. 29 S. : R. 9 W. {,.,. Meridian 

..'Section 5: All. . ; _ ■ '";' '„ .'^vl.'- ',„.:'. ' 

Section 7: All. ' V . ..,' " ■'■■'■ ' ■ 

Section 9: All. '' .•■'•■» "*. - 

Section 11: S/2; NW/4; S/2 NEA. 



Total Area 2^92.36 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 19 74 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application reed. f aw 



Zb^ 







Form 1274-2 
(March 196S) 

(formerly 4— 954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 

Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 


File Code 
3111 A 


S erial Number 

QRJL3378 


Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept. 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 


Description of Land 


- T _ 28 




2. Land requested: State 

• Section 5: 
Section 7: 
Section 8: 
Section 29: 


regon County Douglas 

AH. 

AH. 

NE/4. 

N/2 N/2; NW/4 SW/4; SE/4. 


S. : K. 8 W. : Meridian: 

Willamette 
Total Area 1795.65 Acres 






DATE OF ACTION 


ACTION TAKEN 


August 30, 1974 


Application reed. f aw 



(March 1965) 

(formerly 4-954} 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 

Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and r^s C41 Stat . 437 f 30 USC Sec. 181) 



File Code Serial Number 



.3111 A 



0R13387 



Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 
612 So. Flower Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Land Dept, 



Description of Land 



2. Land requested: State Oregon 



County Douglas 



T.26 S. •• R-8 W. 



Section I: 
Section 10: 
Section 12: 
Section 13: 
Section 24: 



SW/4; S/2 NW/4; Govt. Lots 3 & 4; E/2 SE/4; SEA NE/4. 

SE/4 NE/4. 

SE/4 NW/4; NW/4 SEA. . ; 

E/2; NW/4; E/2 SW/4. 

E/2; S/2 SW/4; SW/4 NW/4. .... . 



: Meridian i 

Wi 1 lamette 



Total Are* '557-75 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



ACTION TAKEN 



August 30, 1974 



Application recd.faw 



tev 



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Form 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 



Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 



Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 
612 So. Flower Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90051 



File Code 



3111 A 



Serial Number 

BBJL33S8 



Land Dept, 



Description of Land 



2. Und r«,u«led: State Oregon County Douglas 

T. 26 S. f R. 8 W. T Willamette Merid ian 

Sec. 20: S/2; HE/k. 

Sec* 22: S/2; S/2 N/2. 
Sec. 30: E/2 SEA; Govt. Lots 3 and k. 

Sec. 32: NW/4 NW/4; Govt. Lots 1 and 2 

Sec. 3^: S/2 SW/4. 
T * 2 7 S., R. 8 w. . Wi I lamette Meridian 



R. 



Meridian 



Sec, 2: S/2 NWA; NW/4 SWA. 
Sec. k% SWA; S/2 N/2; Govt. 



Lots 1, 2, 3 and h. 



ToUlAre. 1922.95 Acr 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 1974 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application reed. f aw 



UeS 



(March 1965) 

(formerly 4-954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 

Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 



File Code 



3111 A 



S erial Number 



M13391 



Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 
612 So. Flower Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Land Dept, 



Description of Land 



2. L»nd r«ju*it*d: Stat* Oregon 



County COOS 



T. 29 S.: K-10 W. : Miijdiarn 

Willamette 



Section 25: All. 

Section 35: Govt. Lots 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7; SW/4 NE/4; W/2 SEA; 

E/2 SW/4; SW/4 SW/4. 
Section 36: SE/4. 



Total Are» 1281.61 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 19 74 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application reed. f aw 



Ikbu 







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(March 1965) 

(formerly 4— 9S4) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 



Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 

Name and Mailing Address 



File Code 



3111 A 



Serial Number 



OKI 



A.: 



Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept, 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Description of Land 



2. Land requested: State Oregon 



County Coos 



Section 13: All. 

Section 15: W/2; N/2 NE/4; Wfk SE/4. 

Section 23: NE/4; Govt. Lots 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and 8 

Section 24; Govt. Lot 4. 

Section 27: NE/4 NE/4; SEA SE/4. 



T.29 S. : R. 10gt. i S=j Meridian 

Wi-*Hame£te 



Total Area 1600.16 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 19 74 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application recd.faw 



jtfcL 



Form 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4— 9S4) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 

Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 



File Code 



3111 A 



Serial Number 

0RI3393 



Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept. 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Description of Land 



I. Land rrqucstcd: State Oregon 



County 



Coos 



T. 29 S.: R. 10 W. 



; .dieridikh! 

Willamette 



Section 1: 
Section 2: 
Section 3: 
Section 11: 
Section 12: 
Section 1^: 



All. 

S/2 S/2; NEA SEA; SEA NEA; Govt. Lots 1 and k. 

All. 

W/2 SWA; S/2 SEA. 

S/2 SWA; NWA SWA; SWA NV/A. 

E/2; E/2 W/2. 



Total Are* 2406.16 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



ACTION TAKEN 



August 30, 19 74 



Application recd.faw 



2.a 



I 



(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



uHiinu M'Al'KS 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 



Act of February 25, 19 20; 
Oil a nd Gaa C41 Srat:. 437, 30 use Sp.r». LfilJ 

Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept. 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



File Code Serial Number 



3111 A 



OK13405 



Description of Land 



1. L»nd requtited: State Oregon 

Section 19: All. 
Section 31; All. 



County Coos 



T. 2$ S.: K. 9 W. 



: Meridian 

Wil lamette 



ToUt Are. I 3^1.12 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 1974 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application reed. f aw 



jLk± 



>..>iarcn iyt>5; 

(formerly 4— 9S4) 

Legal Reference 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



Act of February 25, 1920; 
■QU and P t rr. C41 St-?r ^7 , in TT S C W. 1 Rl) 

Name and Mailing Address 



Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept, 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Description of Land 



>. Land requested: State Oregon 

Section 5: All, 
Section 7: All, 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 1974 



County COOS 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



File Code 



1111 A 



Serial Number 



OKj.3406 



T.28 S. : R-9 W. : Meridian 

Willamette 



Total Are. 1317.52 Acres 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application recd.faw 



2,-70 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
e 
o 

G 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I 

I 


I 



form i2./q^2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



Legal Reference 



Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (4 1 S&a L. 437. 30 use Se n. 1811 

Name and Mailing Address 



File Code 



3111 A 



UNITED STATES 
£^?^ RTMEN T OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Serial Number 



OKJL3407 



Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept. 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Description of Land 



2. Lend requested: State Oregon 



County COOS 



T.^H i,. : R.9 W. - Meridian 

Willamette 



Section 9: 
Section 17 
Section 21 
Section 29 



All. 
All, 
All. 
All. 



' Total Are* 2560 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 1974 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application reed. f aw 



tn\ 



(March 1965) 

(formerly 4-9S4) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 

Act of February 25, 19 20; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 



File Code 



3111 A 



Serial Number 



OR13408 



Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept . 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Description of Land 



I. Land requested: State Oregon 



County 



Coos 



T.28 S. ■ R- 9 W. : ,,, Meridian! 
Willamette ! 



Section 


25 


■ All 


Section 


27 


All 


Section 


33 


All 


Section 


35 


All 



Total Area 2560 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



ACTION TAKEN 



August 30, 1974 



Application reed. f aw 



Z2£ 



1 


Form 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 


SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 


UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 


1 

G 


Legal Reference 


File Code 


Serial Number 


Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 


3111 A 


OB13409 


Name and Mailing Address 




Mobil Oil Corporation 




1 


612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept. 
Los Angeles, CA 90051 




1 






I 






1 
1 
1 


Description of Land 


2. Land requestmJ: State Oregon County CooS 

Section k: SEA SWA. 
Section 13: All. 
Section 15: All. 
Section 22: SWA. 
Section 23: All. 


T. 28 S.: R. 3 W. : Meridian 

Wi I lamette 


1 




Total Are* 2120 Acre* 


1 






1 


DATE OF ACTION 


ACTION TAKEN 










August 30, 1974 


Application reed. f aw 




1 








1 








1 








1 








I 








1 




2.75 





(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 



Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 

Name and Mailing Address 



File Code 



3111 A 



S erial Number 



Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept. 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Description of Land 



J. Land requested: StaU Oregon 

Section Ij All. 

Section 3: All. 

■' Section II: All. 

Section 12: S/2; NWA. 



County 



Coos 



T. 2tf S.: R. 3 W. :,,... Meridim 
Wi I lamette 



Total Ar*« 2^10.26 A crea 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 1974 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application reed. f aw 



^7/ 




I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

s 
I 
I 

D 
I 
I 
1 
1 
I 
I 
I 



Form 1274-2 
(.'.larch 1965) 

(forme-fly 4— 9S4) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 



Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 



File Code 



3111 A 



Name and Mailing Address 



Serial Number 



UH13411 



Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flox^er Street - Land Dept. 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Description of Land 



2. Land requuted: State Oregon 



County COOS 



T. 27 S. : R. 9 W. : Meridian 

Wi I lamette 



Section 17: All. 

Section 18: N/2 SEA; SW/4 SE/4; 

Govt. Lots 5, 6, 7, 8, 3, 10, 11, 12. 
Section 19: Al 1. . 

Section 20; S/2. ' ' : 



Total Are* 2048.17 Acre8 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 19 74 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application reed. f aw 



23± 



Form 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4— 954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 



Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 



File Code 



3111 A 



Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 
612 So. Flower Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Serial Number 



GH134i£ 



- Land Dept, 



Description of Land 



X, Land rcqunted: State OTegon 



County COOS 



Section 25 
Section 26 
Section 27 
Section 34 
Section 35 



N/2. 

N/2; N/2 S/2. 

N/2; N/2 S/2. 

S/2; NE/4; S/2 NW/4; NE/4 NW/4. 

All. 



T.27 S. : R-9 W. : Meridian 

Willamette 



ToUIArea 2520 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 19 74 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application recd.faw 



2,-Ko 



i 

G 


I 
I 

Q 
1 

1 

I 

I 



".larch 1965) 
(formerly 4— 9S4) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



Legal Reference 



Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and G as (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 

Name and Mailing Address 



Mobil Oil Corporation 
612 So. Flower Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Description of Land 



2. Lund requested: State Oregon 



Section 21 
Section 22 
Section 23 
Section 24 



All. 
All. 
All. 
All. 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 19 74 



Land Dept. 



County COOS 



UMTKD STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



File Code 



3111 A 



Serial Number 



QK13413 



T. 27 S.: R. 9 W. :,.,, Meridian 
W»l lamette 



Total Are. 2560 Acres 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application recd.faw 







Z77 



(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 

Legal Reference 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil find Gas (41 Stal- . 437, 30 TTSC Sec. 18T) 



Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept, 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



File Code 



■3111 A 



Serial Number 



8JU3414 



Description of Land 



1, 


La 


id requeued: 

Section 
Section 
Section 
Section 


State 

9: 
10: 
14: 
15: 


Oregon 

All. 
All. 
All. 
All. 


County 


Coos 



T. 27 S.: R. 9 W. : Meridian 

Willamette 



Total Area 2560 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 1974 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application recd.faw 



17? 



Form 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 

Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat . 437, 30 USC Se c. 181 )_ 

Name and Malting Address 



File Code 



3111 A 



S erial Number 



UK 



Mobil Oil Corporation 
612 So. Flower Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90051 



Land Dept. 



Description of Land 



I. Land requested: State Oregon 



County COOS 



T.27 S. : R. 9 W. : Meridian 

Ml I lamette 



Section k: 
Section 5: 
Section 6: 
Section 7: 
Section 8: 



All. 

All. 

SE/4; SE/4 SW/4; Govt. Lot 1. 

NE/4; E/2 NW/4; Govt. Lots I, 2, 3, **, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10. 

W/2 SWA; N/2 NW/*+. 



Total Area 2361 .^8 Acres 



DATE OF ACTION 



August 30, 19 74 



ACTION TAKEN 



Application reed. f aw 



Z77 



(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 



t * *-»-»> k> x e\ i JL.O 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



Legal Reference 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437. 30 USC Sec. 181) 

Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept. 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



File Code 



3111 A 



Serial Number 



M1341& 



Description of Land 



J. Land requested: State Oreg 



Section 29 
Section 30 
Section 31 
Section 33 



on 



All, 



County COOS 



T. 27 S..-R. 9 w. 



! i>" i i Meridian ; 

Wi i lamette 



SEA; E/2 W/2; Govt. Lots I, 2, 3 and 4. 

A) 1. 

S/2 SEA; HZ/h SE/4. 



TotalAre* 1881.64 Acreg 



DATE OF ACTION 



ACTION TAKEN 



August 30, 1974 Application recd.faw 



z?o 



n 

10 



Form 1274-2 
(March 1965) 

(formerly 4—954) 



SERIAL REGISTER PAGE 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 



Legal Reference 



Act of February 25, 1920; 
Oil and Gas (41 Stat. 437, 30 USC Sec. 181) 

Name and Mailing Address 

Mobil Oil Corporation 

612 So. Flower Street - Land Dept. 

Los Angeles, CA 90051 



File Code Serial Number 



3111 A 



0*13422 



Description of Land 



2. Land requested: State Oregon 



County Douglas 



Section 3: S/2 NWA; SWA; Govt. Lots 3 & k. 
Section J- s/2 NEA; SEA; Govt. Lots 1 & 2. 
Section 6: E/2 SEA. 



T. 23 S.: R. 9 W. : Meridla^ 

Willamette 



Tot»lAre« 716.05 Acr 



DATE OF ACTION 



ACTION TAKEN 



August 30, 1974 



Application recd.faw 



ZSi 



u 



APPENDIX V 



SOIL ASSOCIATION DESCRIPTIONS 



t& 



I 

D 
D 



Jory Association (Symbol B) 

This association occurs on moderately sloping foothills along the 
Umpqua River between Elkton and Scottsburg. They developed in fine 
textured colluvuim from sedimentary and volcanic rocks in areas re- 
ceiving less than 60 inches of precipitation. They are dry for long 
periods each summer. White oak and poison oak are common on these 
soils. This association makes up about 2 percent of the area. 

Deep, red, clayey Jory soils make up about 70 percent of the area and 
occur on old stable rounded foothills and uniform sideslopes. Other 
xeric soils, that were not mapped in the District because of their small 
extent, make up about 30 percent of the area. They include the moderately 
deep, red clayey Nekia soils and unclassified xeric, loamy-skeletal 
soils. 

The soils of this association are used for farming, timber production, 
wildlife habitat and watershed. The long dry period during the summer 
is a chief limitation for timber production. 

Blachly-Preacher-Bohannon Association (Symbol D) 

This association occurs on gently sloping to steep ridgetops, sideslopes 
and slump benches between the East and Middle Forks of the Coquille 
River and on Callahan Ridge. They developed in fine and medium textured 
colluvium from sedimentary rocks in areas receiving between' 60 and 80 
inches of precipitation. The soils are not dry for as much as 45 days 
during the summer. Douglas fir is the dominant tree on these soils. 
This association makes up about 1_0_ percent of the area. 

Deep red, well developed, fine Blachly soils make up about 50 percent of 
the area; deep, brown fine loamy Preacher soils make up about 30 percent 
of the area; and moderately deep, brown fine loamy Bohannon soils make 
up about 20 percent of the area. The Blachly soils are mostly on the 
gentle sloping, slumpy ridgetops and sideslopes. The Preacher soils are 
mostly on moderately steep, slumpy sideslopes. The Bohannon soils are 
on the steep sideslopes and finger ridges. Mingled with the Blachly 
soils are minor inclusions of red, clayey Honeygrove soils. Mingled 
with the Preacher and Bohannon soils are minor inclusions of the moderately 
deep, loamy skeletal Digger soils and of the shallow brown loamy skeletal 
Jason soils. 

The soils of this association are used for timber production, farming, 
wildlife habitat and watershed. Compaction susceptibility is a hazard 
on the Blachly soils. 

Preacher- Blachly- Bohannon Association (Symbol E) 

This association occurs on gently sloping to steep ridgetops, sideslopes 
and slump benches widely scattered between Catching Slough and Fairview, 
and between Tioga Creek and the Middle Fork of the Coquille River east 
of Sandy Creek. They developed in fine and medium textured colluvium 
from sedimentary rocks in areas receiving between 60 and 80 inches of 
precipitation. The soils are not dry for as much as 45 days during the 



t& 



summer. Douglas fir is the dominant tree on these soils. This a 
association makes up about 2£ percent of the area. 

Deep, brown, fine loamy Preacher soils make up about 50 percent of 
the area, deep, red, fine Blachly soils make up about 30 percent of the 
area, and moderately deep, brown, fine loamy Bohannon soils make up 
about 20 percent of the area. The Preacher soils are mostly on moder- 
ately steep, slumpy sideslopes. The Blachly soils are mostly on the 
gently sloping, slumpy ridgetops and sideslopes. The Bohannon soils are 
on the steep sideslopes and finger ridges. Mingled with the Preacher 
soils are minor inclusions of moderately deep, brown, loamy skeletal 
Digger soils. Mingled with the Blachly soils are minor inclusions of 
deep, red, well developed, clayey Honeygrove soils. Mingled with the 
Bohannon soils are minor inclusions of the shallow, brown, loamy skeletal 
Jason soils. 

The soils of this association are used for timber production, farming, 
wildlife habitat and watershed. Compaction susceptibility is a 
hazard on the Blachly soils. 

Preacher-Slickrock-Bohannon-Association (Symbol S) 

This association occurs on gently sloping to steep ridgetops, sideslopes 
and slump benches in the vicinity of Ferntop, Little Mill Creek and 
Steampot Ridge, north of Scottsburg, Oregon. They developed in medium- 
textured colluvium from sedimentary rocks in areas receiving between 
70 and 90 inches of precipitation. The soils are not dry for as much 
as 45 days during the summer. Douglas fir is the dominant tree on 
these soils. This association makes up about 1_ percent of the area. 

Deep brown, fine loamy Preacher soils make up about 50 percent of the 
area, deep, black, Slickrock soils make up about 30 percent of the 
area, and moderately deep, brown, fine loamy Bohannon soils make up 
about 20 percent of the area. The Preacher soils are mostly on gently 
sloping, slumpy ridgetops and sideslopes. The Slickrock soils are 
mostly on gently sloping and moderately steep slump benches and uneven 
sideslopes. The Bohannon soils are on the steep sideslopes and finger 
ridges. Mingled with the Preacher soils are minor inclusions of the 
deep, red, fine Blachly soils. Mingled with the Slickrock soils are 
minor inclusions of the deep, brown, clayey Apt soils. Mingled with 
the Bohannon soils are minor inclusions of the shallow, brown, loamy 
skeletal Jason soils. 

The soils of this association are used for timber production, farming, 
wildlife habitat and watershed. Landslide and erosion susceptibility 
are hazards on Slickrock soils. 

Preacher-Digger- Jason Association (Symbol F) 

This association occurs on gently sloping to extremely steep ridgetops, 
sideslopes, slump benches and headwalls in the Burnt Mountain Area at 
the headwaters of the East Fork Coquille River and in the vicinity of 
Mehl Creek and Waggoner Creek south of Elkton in the Loon Lake Resource 



■ZVb 



D 
D 

I 

1 
I 
I 
I 

D 

D 

D 
G 
D 
1 
□ 
E 
I 



Area. They developed in medium textured and coarse textured colluvium 
from sedimentary rocks in areas receiving between 60 and 80 inches of 
precipitation. The soils are not dry for as much as 45 days during the 
summer. Douglas fir is the dominant tree on these soils. This as- 
sociation makes up about 5_ percent of the area. 

Deep, brown, fine loamy Preacher soils make up about 50 percent of the 
area; moderately deep, brown, loamy skeletal Digger soils make up about 
30 percent of the area, and shallow, brown, loamy skeletal Jason soils 
make up about 20 percent of the area. The Preacher soils are mostly on 
the gently sloping slumpy ridgetops and sideslopes. The Digger soils 
are mostly on the steep sideslopes and finger ridges. The Jason soils 
are mostly on the very steep sideslopes and headwalls. Mingled with the 
Preacher soils are minor inclusions of the deep, red, fine Blachly 
soils. Mingled with the Digger soils are minor inclusions of the 
moderately deep, brown, fine loamy Bohannon soils and the deep, brown, 
loamy skeletal Unnamed 166 soils. The soils of this association are 
used for timber production, farming, wildlife habitat and watershed. 
Landslide and erosion susceptibility is a hazard on Jason soils. 

Bohannon- Jason- Preacher Association (Symbol G) 

This association occurs on steep to very steep ridgetops, sideslopes and 
headwalls throughout Coos County. They developed in medium-textured and 
coarse textured colluvium from sedimentary rocks in areas receiving 
between 60 and 100 inches of precipitation. The soils are not dry for 
as much as 45 days during the summer. Douglas fir is the dominant tree 
on these soils. The association makes up about K)^ percent of the area. 

Moderately deep, brown, fine loamy Bohannon soils make up about 50 
percent of the area; shallow, brown, loamy skeletal Jason soils make up 
about 30 percent of the area; and deep, brown, fine loamy Preacher soils 
make up about 20 percent of the area. 

The Bohannon soils are mostly on the steep sideslopes and finger ridges. 
The Jason soils are mostly on the very steep sideslopes and headwalls. 
The Preacher soils are on the gently sloping and moderately steep 
slumping ridgetops and sideslopes. Mingled with the Bohannon soils are 
minor inclusions of the moderately deep, brown, loamy skeletal Digger 
soils. Mingled with the Jason soils are minor inclusions of the brown, 
Lithic, loamy skeletal Umpcoos soils and Rockland Miscellaneous Land- 
Type. Mingled with the Preacher soils are minor inclusions of the deep, 
red, fine Blachly soils. 

The soils of this association are used for timber production, 
farming, wildlife habitat and watershed. 

Digger- Jason- Rockland Association (Symbol J) 

This association occurs on very steep and extremely steep narrow ridge- 
tops, finger ridges, sideslopes and headwalls throughout the Coos Bay 



■zS-7 



District. They developed in coarse textured colluvium from sedimentary 
rocks in areas receiving between 60 and 100 inches of precipitation. 
The soils are not dry for as much as 45 days during the summer. Douglas 
fir is the cominant tree on these soils. This association makes up 
about 5_ percent of the area. 

Moderately deep, brown, loamy skeletal Digger soils make up about 
45 percent of the area. Shallow, brown, loamy skeletal Jason soils make 
up about 35 percent of the area, and Rockland Miscellaneous Land Type 
makes up the remaining 20 percent of the area. 

The Digger soils are mostly on the very steep finger ridges and side- 
slopes. The Jason soils are mostly on the narrow ridgetops and very 
steep to extremely steep sideslopes and headwalls. The Rockland is on 
the extremely steep sideslopes and rock headwalls. Mingled with the 
Digger soils are minor inclusions of the deep, brown, loamy skeletal 
Unnamed 166 soils and the moderately deep, brown, fine loamy Bohannon 
soils. Mingled with the Jason soils and the Rockland Miscellaneous 
Land Type are the Lithic, brown, loamy skeletal Umpcoos soils. 

The soils of this association are used for timber production, wildlife 
habitat and watershed. 

One common characteristic shared by nearly all of the soil series 
linked by the various soil associations listed above is their suscep- 
tibility to mass soil movements and slumping. On slopes of only moderate 
steepness, (35% to 60%), undisturbed slopes in seemingly stable areas 
will sometimes fail when triggered by extended periods of heavy rainfa 1 !. 
Areas touched by man's activities, road construction, logging, etc., se ■ m 
to accelerate these movements. In the EAR area, roads that have been 
constructed for years have suddenly failed after periods of heavy rains. 



zn 





D 
1 

Li 

D 


B 
D 
D 

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APPENDIX VI 

VI-A Fragile Site Locations within Lease Application Areas. 

VI-B Existing Road System - Lease Application Areas and Vicinity 

VI-C Critical Wildlife (elk § fish) Habitat Locations within the 
Lease Application Areas. 



24? 



B 



c 

D 

D 

G 





I 

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1 


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APPENDIX VI -A 



FRAGILE SITE LOCATIONS 



WITHIN THE LEASE APPLICATION AREAS 



zlf 



I 

1 

D 


1 
1 
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1 
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1 
I 
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I 



FRAGILE SITE LOCATIONS 

LOON LAKE AREA (I of 2) 

OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 







OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 



ROADS 

STREAMS 
FRAGILE AREAS 



733 



-jf\± -L\_/11iJ 



K./ON 



RIO N 



LOON LAKE AREA (2 of 2) 
r ^ OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 



R.9 N 




LEGEND 



6^ 



OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 



w 



mM ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 

j " ROADS 

C^L STREAMS 



R1 N 



FRAGILE AREAS 



2?f 



I 
I 
I 
I 



I 



I 

I 



II 
I 





FRAGILE SITE LOCATIONS 

CALLAHAN AREA 

OIL ■$ GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 




«9 JV 



LEGEND 



^ OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 



(FEDERAL LAND) 

COOS BAY DISTRICT LEASE 
APPLICATIONS IN ROSEBURG DISTRICT 
EAR (FEDERAL LAND) 



SCALE: 1" 



ROADS 
STREAMS 



= 1 Mile 



FRAGILE AREAS 



r 

s 



T 

5 



_2- 



9<_ 



-/VJ.TVA J. KS1 li-f 



COQUILLE RIVER AREA (1 of 5) 
OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 



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LEGEND 



^ OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
v NJ (FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



:-s 



SCALE: 1" » 1 Mile 

. ' ROADS 

FRAGILE AREAS 



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LEGEND 



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OIL & GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

COOS BAY DIST. LEASE 
APPLICATIONS IN ROSEBURG 
DISTRICT EAR (FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 

ROADS 
STREAMS 

FRAGILE AREAS 



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FRAGILE SITE LOCATIONS 
COQUILLE RIVER AREA (3 of 5) 
RQM OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 

-n 




LEGEND 



\ 



^ OIL & GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 



ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



SCALE: .1" = 1 Mil. 

ROADS 
STREAMS 

FRAGILE AREAS 



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FRAGILE SITE LOCATIONS 
COQUILLE RIVER AREA (4 o£ 5) 
:OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS, 



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SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 



LEGEND 



OIL 5 GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
CFEDERAL LAND) 

COOS BAY DISTRICT LEASE 
APPLICATIONS IN ROSEBURG 
DISTRICT EAR [FEDERAL LAND) 



ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 
ROADS 

FRAGILE AREAS 



122. 



fKAGiLE SITE LOCATIONS 
COQUILLE RIVER AREA (5 of 5) 
tfo? /0 *<■;] 1QIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 






h»«ra I as 
M ' '-ft V 



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LEGEND 

OIL $ GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 



ROADS 
STREAMS 

FRAGILE AREAS 



._-'" 



300 



I 



APPENDIX VI-B 

EXISTING ROAD SYSTEM - LEASE APPLICATION 
AREAS AND VICINITY 



3D I 



ROAD SYSTEM 
LOON LAKE AREA 



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LEGEND 



SCALE: 1/2" * 1 Mile 



LEASE AREA GENERAL BOUNDARY 







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ROAD SYSTEM 
CALLAHAN AREA 



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LEGEND 



SCALE: 1/2" =» 1 Mile 



LEASE AREA GENERAL BOUNDARY 



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SCALE; 1/2" = 1 Mile 



LEGEND 



LEASE AREA GENERAL BOUNDARY 



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APPENDIX VI-C 

CRITICAL WILDLIFE (ELK § FISH) HABITAT 
LOCATIONS WITHIN THE LEASE APPLICATION AREAS 



3*>7 



I 
I 



S'SKK ™ L0CATI0NS 

OIL £ GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 




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OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 



ROADS 
STREAMS 



ELK 



FISH 



CRITICAL WILDLIFE 
HABITAT AREAS 



3of 



K/OM 



^ivni^ni. fvibULiift HADiiAl LULAIIUiNi) 
LOON LAKE AREA (2 of 2) 
^ OIL $ GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS, 



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LEGEND 

OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
CFEDERAL LAND) 



ill ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 

i ** ROADS 

- — -" STREAMS 



R1 W 



m 



ELK 
FISH 



CRITICAL 
WILDLIFE 
HABITAT 
AREAS 



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CRITICAL WILDLIFE HABITAT LOCATIONS 
COQUILLE RIVER AREA 
OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 



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SCALE : 



1 Mile 



LEGEND 



OIL & GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
K N (FEDERAL LAND) 



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ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



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ROADS 

ELK 
FISH 



CRITICAL 
WILDLIFE 
HABITAT 
AREAS 



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OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
(FEDERAL LAND) 

COOS BAY DIST. LEASE 
APPLICATIONS IN ROSEBURG 
DISTRICT EAR (FEDERAL LAND) 

ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



/?9>v 



LEGEND 



SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 

ROADS 

STREAMS 



ELK A CRITICAL WILDLIFE 
HABITAT AREAS 
^H FISH J 




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CRITICAL WILDLIFE HABITAT LOCATIONS 
COQUILLE RIVER AREA 
,OIL 5 GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS, , 




SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 



LEGEND 



c^ 



OIL £ GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
CFEDERAL LAND) 

COOS BAY DISTRICT LEASE 
APPLICATIONS IN ROSEBURG 
DISTRICT EAR (FEDERAL LAND) 







ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 
ROADS 



CRITICAL WILDLIFE 
HABITAT AREAS 




113 



K.IOW 



uKiiiuu, WILDLIFE HABITAT LOCATIONS 
COQUILLE RIVER AREA 



MOIL ■§ GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 

■■-jr-.-.-gr-.r--:^- \ ——i 







;,w .U -. '"■-■■,-r>-;' 
' •> ,' i ■ ' --Ki 

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LEGEND 



OIL § GAS LEASE APPLICATIONS 
vJ^J (FEDERAL LAND) 



— ^ 



ADDITIONAL FEDERAL LAND 



SCALE: 1" = 1 Mile 



ROADS 
STREAMS 



ELK ] CRITICAL WILDLIFE 
( HABITAT AREAS 

FISH 



3/V 



G 
D 



APPENDIX VII 



PARTIAL LISTING OF COMMON NATIVE 



PLANT SPECIES IN THE REPORT AREA 



I 

3/4 



1 
I 



Partial Listing of Common Native Plant Species 
in the Report Areas 



Conifers 



I 



Douglas-fir 
Incense cedar 
Port Orford cedar 
Sitka spruce 
Western Hemlock 
Western redcedar 

Hardwoods 



Bigleaf maple 
Golden chinkapin 
Oregon-myrtle 
Pacific madrone 
Red alder 
Wild cherry 
Willow \ 

Shrubs 



Blackberry 
Blue myrtle 
California hazel 

Devilsclub 

Evergreen huckleberry 
Foxglove 
Oceanspray 
Oregongrape 
Ovalleaf huckleberry 
Pacific dogwood 
Pacific poison oak 
Red Elderberry 

Red huckleberry 
Rhododendron 
Salal 

Salmonberry 
Thimbleberry 
Varnishleaf 
Vine maple 
Western yew 
Wild rose 



Ps eudotsuga Menziesii 
Libocedrus decurrens 
Chamaecyparis lawsomana 
Picea sitchensis 
Tsuga heterophylla 
Thuja plicata 



Acer macrophyllum 
Castanopsis chrysophylla 



Umbellularia cali fornica 
Arbutus menziesi 



Alnus rubra 
Prunus spp. 
Salix spp. 



Rubus spp. 

Ceanothus Thyrsiflorus 

Corylus cornuta var. 

californica 
Oplopanax horridum 
Vaccinium ovatum 
Digitalis purpurea 
Holodiscus discolor 
Berberis nervosa 
Vaccinium ovalifolium 
Cornus nuttallii 
Rhus diversiloba 
Sambucus racemosa var. 

arborescens 



Vaccinium parvifolium 
Rhododendron macrophyllum 
Gaultheria shallon 
Rubus spectabilis 
Rubus parviflorus 
Ceanothus spp. 
Acer circinatum 



Taxus brevifolia 



Rosa 



spp. 



3TL 



Herbs 



Australian fireweed 

Deerfern 

Evergreen violet 

False lily-of-the-valley 

Ladyfern 

Lupine 

Oregon iris 

Oregon oxalis 

Pacific peavine 

Pearly everlasting 

Rustyleaf 

Smith's fairybells 

Snowqueen 

Swordfern 

Twinflower 

Western fescue 

Western maidenhair fern 

Western prince's pine 

Whipple vine 

White trillium 

Wild ginger 



Erechtites prenanthoides 
Blechnum spicant 
Viola sempervirens 
Maianthemum dilatatum 
Athyrium filix-femina 
Lupinus spp. 
Iris tenax 
Oxalis oregana 
Lathyrus polyphyllus 
Anaphalis margaritacea 
Menziesia ferruginea 
Disporium smithii 
Synthyris reniformis 
Polystichum munitum 
Linnea borealis 
Festuca occidentalis 
Adiantum pedatum 
Chimaphila umbellata 
lVhipplea modesta 
Trillium ovatum 
As arum caudatum 



3ti 



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APPENDIX VIII 



LIST OF MAMMALS, BIRDS, REPTILES AND 



AMPHIBIANS FOUND IN THE ANALYSIS AREA 



3tf 



CO 

o 



Cd 



4> 



River Otter Latra canadensis Streams and Stream banks 



Marten Martes americana Mature Forests 



Raccoon Procyon lotor Near Streams in Forest 

Mink Mustela vison Near Streams 

Coyote Canis l atrans Brushy Areas, Cut-overs 

Striped Skunk Mephitis mephitis Mixed Forest, Brush land 

Spotted Skunk Spilogale putorius Brushy areas near Streams 



All Mammals Found in the Following List are Year-Around Residents to the Planning Unit 
l COMMON NAME SCIENTIFIC NAME PREFERRED HABITAT POPULATION STATUS 

Roosevelt Elk Cervus canadensis Forest and Forest edge ■. s 

Black-tailed deer Odocoilous hemionus Forest and Forest edge I 

Black Bear Ursus americanus Forest and Rough terrain I 

Mountain Lion Folis cancolor Rugged Forest Areas I 



Ring- tailed Cat Bossariscus a stutus Rocky Forest Area Near Water 



Population Status - I, Increasing, S, Stable, D, Decreasing, U, Unknown. 



I 



Beaver Castor canadensis Streams, Swamps, Ponds I 



U 



Muskrat Ondatra zibethica Marshes, Streams U to I 



U to D 

U 

I 

u 
u 



Short-tailed Weasel Mustela erminea Brushy, Forests, near water I 

Long-tailed Weasel Mustela Frenata Forests, Brush near Water- I 



U 



All Mammals Found in the Following List are Year-Around Residents to the Planning Unit 



Vu 

^ 
^ 



CO 

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i 

S. 

w 



COMMON NAME 
Brush rabbit 
Townsend Chipmunk 



SCIENTIFIC NAME 
Sylvilagus bachmani 
Eutamias Townsendi 



Western Gray Squirrel Sciurus griseus 
Northern Flying Squirrel Glaucomys sabrinus 



Mountain Beaver 
Deer Mouse 
Towbridge shrew 
Townsend Mole 
Big Brown Bat 
Porcupine 
Shrew Mole 
Pocket gopher 



Aplodontia r ufa 
Peromyscus manicula tus 
Sorex towbridge i 
Scapanus Towsendi 
Eptes icus fuscus 
Erethizon dorsatum 



Ncurotrichus g ibbsi 
Thomomys bottae 
Wood Rat (Bushy-tailed) Neotoma cinerea 
Dusky Tree Mouse Phena corny s silvicola 



PREFERRED HABITAT 
Brushy Areas 

Coniferous Forest and Brush 
Open Forest Edge Areas 
Coniferous and Mixed Forest 
Moist Forest Areas 
All types of Habitat 
Coniferous Forest 
Forest and Grassy Areas 
Forested Areas, Caves 
Brushy Areas and Forest 
Moist Areas along Streams 
Meadows, Valleys 
High Rocky Areas 
Coniferous Trees 



POPULATION STATUS 
I 
S 
S 

S to D 
S 
I 

u 
u 
u 

I 

S 

u 
u 

u 



4> 



Population Status-I, Increasing, S, Stable, D, Decreasing, U, Unknown 



COMMON NAME SCIENTIFIC NAME 



Ruffed grouse 
Blue grouse 
Mountain quail 



Banasa umbel I us 



ABUNDANCE KEY 



PREFERRED HABITAT 



Mixed Forest 



Dendragapus obscurus Forest, wooded slopes 

Oreortyx picta Woodlands and Forests 

-Sa-H-fo-rmr a quail - Lophortyx californicus Woodlands and Brush 

Band-tailed pigeon Columbia fasciata Coast Forest and Brush 

Mourning dove Zenaidura macroura Fields, Orchards 

Pheasant Phasianus calchicus Agricultural Areas 



STATUS 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Summer Res 

Resident 

Resident 



ABUNDANCE 
Fairly Common 
Fairly Common 
Fairly Common 
Common 

Fairly Common 
Fairly Common 

Uncommon 



Upland game bird hunting is normally carried out incidental to other hunting within the Planning 
Unit with the exception of Band-tailed pigeons,* 



n 



S 









*Hunted along Smith River, Sandy Creek Bridge area, Cherry Creek, Blue Ridge and along B.P.A. power 
line R/W areas to name a few. (See table #22) 



RAPTORS 



FAMILY ACCIPITRIDAE 



COMMON NAME 
Bald Eagle 

Golden Eagle 

Red -tailed Hawk 
Goshawk 

Sharp-Shinned Hawk 
fsj Coopers HawK 
Marsh Hawk 

Osprey 

Pigeon Hawk 
Sparrow Hawk 

Barn Owl 



SCIENTIFIC NAME 



PREFERRED HABITAT 



Haliaeetus leucocephalus Coastal Rivers and lakes 



Aquila chrysaetos 

Buteo jamaicensis 
Accipiter gentilis 
Acclpiter striatus 
Accipiter cooperii 
Circus cyaneus 

Pandion haliaetus 

Falco columbarius 
Falco sparverius 

Tyto alba 



High Elevation-near 

openings 

Clear cuts & Forested 

Areas 
Coniferous Forest 

Forest, Mixed Woodlands 

Woodlands & Draws 

Open Fields, Marshes 
FAMILY PANDIONIDAE 

Coastal lakes & Rivers 
FAMILY FALCONIDAE 

Woodland areas 

Woodland - open 
FAMILY TYTONIDAE 

Barns & abandoned Bldgs . 



STATUS 

Migrate dur- 
ing Fall - 
Return Jan. 

Migrates Dur- 
ing Fall 
Returns Spg. 

Resident 

S umme r 

Resident 
Resident 

Resident 

Resident 



ABUNDANCE 



Uncommon 

Rare 

Common 

Rare 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 

Common 



Summer 


Uncommon 


Resident 




Resident 


Rare 


Resident 


Common 



Resident 



Common 



SC-WM&B-21-1974 



COMMON NAME 
Screech Owl 
Great Horned Owl 
Snowy Owl 
Pygmy Owl 
Spotted Owl 
Long-eared Owl 
Short-eared Owl 



A) 



^ Saw-Whet Owl 



Red-shafted Flicker 
Pileated Woodpecker 
Acorn Woodpecker 
Lewis Woodpecker 



SCIENTIFIC NAME 



Otus asio 



Bubo virginianus 


Nye tea 


sea nd iaca 


Glauci 


dium gnoma 


Strix 


occidenta lis 



Asio otus 



Asio flammeus 



Aegolius acadicus 



Colaptes cafer 
Dryocopus pileatus 
Melanerpes formicivorus 
Asyndesmus lewis 



RAPTORS (CONT. ) 
FAMILY STIGIDAE 

PREFERRED HABITAT 
Decidious Forest 
All Areas 
Open Areas-Fields 
All areas 
Old Growth Forest 
Mixed Wood-open 
Open Areas - Marshes 
Mixed Forest 
WOODPECKERS 
FAMILY PICIDAE 



Mixed Forest 

Snags, Coniferous 

Forest 
Oak Groves, Tan Oak, etc, 

All Forests 



STATUS 
Resident 
Resident 
Winter Resident 
Resident 
Resident 
Winter Resident 
Winter Resident 
Resident 



Resident 
Resident 
Resident 
Resident 



ABUNDANCE 

Common 

Common 

Irregular 

Common 

Rare 

Rare 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 



Common 
Uncommon 
Common 
Uncommon 



SC-WM&B-22-1974 



WOODPECKERS 



COMMON NAME 



SCIENTIFIC NAME 



Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Sphyrapicus varius 



Hairy Woodpecker 
Downy Woodpecker 



Dendrocopos villosus 
Dendrocopos pubescens 



FAMILY PICIDAE 

PREFERRED HABITAT 
Mixed Forest 
Mixed Wood-conifers 
Mixed Forest -Deciduous 



STATUS 
Resident 
Resident 
Resident 



ABUNDANCE 
Uncommon 
Uncommon 
Uncommon 



Turkey Vulture 



Cathartes aura . 



Summery Resident Common 



FAMILY CARTHARTIDAE 
All Areas 

OTHER BIRDS , Including water associated, song, humming 
birds, scavangers, and general common birds within the Planning Unit. See .36 of the URA for Scientific names 



Common egret 
3*. Great Blue Heron 

Black-crowned night Heron 

American bittern 

White faced Ibis 

Sandhill Crane 

Virginia Rail 

Sora 

Yellow Rail 



Marshes and Lakes 

Streams 

Marshy Areas 

Marshy Areas 

Marshy Areas 

Farms, Fields, Marshes 

Marshes 

Marshes 

Marshes 



Summer Resident 
Resident 
Resident 
Residen t 



Residence 

Summer Resident 

Accidenta 1 
SC-WM&B-23-1974 



Uncommon 
Common 
Uncommon 
Uncommon 



Summer Resident Accidental 
Summer Resident Very Common 



Uncommon 
Uncommon 
Accidenta 1 



OTHER BIRDS 



COMMON NAME 
Killcieer 

Western Kingbird 
Tropical King Bird 
Traills' Flycatcher 
Hammards' Flycatcher 
Dusky Flycatcher 
Western Flycatcher 
Western Wood Peewee 



\xj Olive-sided Flycatcher 
Horned Lark 



Barn Swallow 
Cliff Swallow 
Violet-green Swallow 
Tree Swallow 
Bank Swallow 
Rough-winged Swallow 
Purple Martin 



PREFERRED HABITAT 
Fields & Mudflats 
Ranches, Farms 
Mixed Brush 
Forested Streams 
Coniferous Forests 
Brushy Hillsides 
Deciduous Forest 
Coniferous & Mixed W. 
Mixed Forest 
Open Fields - High C. 
Around Water 
Steep Rocky Areas 
Around Water 
Streams, Lakes 
Around Water 
Around Water 
Around Water 



STATUS 
Resident 
Summer Resident 
Accidental 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 



ABUNDANCE 

Very Common 

Occasional 

Accidental 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 

Common 

Uncommon 

Common 

Very Common 

Very Common 

Very Common 

Very Common 

Uncommon 

Rare 

Uncommon 



SC-WM&B-24-1974 



OTHER BIRDS 



COMMON NAME 

Scrub jay 

Gray jay 

Common Raven 

Common Crow 

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 

Mountain Chickadee 

Common Bushtit 
' Wrentit 
■N Dipper 

White-breasted Nuthatch 

Red-breasted Nuthatch 

Brown Creeper 

House Wren 

Winter Wren 

Bewick's Wren 



PREFERRED HABITAT 

Brush fields 

High Forests Lands 

High Country, Variablilty 

Open Areas, Farms 

Conifers, Mixed Woods 

Coniferous Forest 

Hardwood Areas 

Coastal Mixed Forest 

Streams 

Mixed Forest, Dec. 

Mixed Forest, Conif. 

Coniferous, Mixed Forest 

Brush, Dec. Forest 

Dense Coniferous Forest 

Deciduous Forests 



STATUS 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Summer Resident 

Resident 

Resident 



ABUNDANCE 

Very Common 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 

Very Common 

Very Common 

Uncommon 

Very Common 

Common 

Uncommon 

Common 

Common 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 

Common 

Common 



SC-WM&B-25-1974 



OTHER BIRDS 



COMMON NAME 

American Robin 

Varied Thrush 

Townsends' Solitaire 

Hermit Thrush 

Swainsons 1 Thrush 
Western Bluebird 
Mountain Bluebird 
Golden-crowned Kinglet 
Vj Ruby-crowned Kinglet 
Water Pipit 
Cedar Waxwing 
Northern Shrike 
Logger Shcike 
S tarling 
Solitary Vireo 
Button's Viro 



PREFERRED HABITAT 

Fields, Residential 

Coniferous 6c Mixed Hard, 

Conifers 

Coniferous & Deciduous 

Coniferous & Hardwood 

Open Woods 

Fields & Forest edge 

Coniferous 

Mixed Forest 

Fields & Hills 

Open Woods-near water 

Fields 

Forest edge 

Open Fields, Farms 

Deciduous Forest 

Conifers & Hardwoods 



STATUS 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Summer Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Winter Visitor 

Resident 

Resident 

Summer" Resident 

Resident 



ABUNDANCE 

Very Common 

Common 

Rare 

Uncommon 

Common 

Uncommon 

Occasional 

Common 
Uncommon 

Very Common 

Very Common 

Uncommon 

Rare 

Very Common 

Uncommon 

Rare 



SC-WM&B-26-I9 74 



OTHER BIRDS 



COMMON NAME 
Warbling Vireo 
Orange-crowned Warbler 
Ye How Warbler 
Myrtle Warbler 
Audubon's Warbler 
Townsends ' Warbler 
Black-throated gray warbler 
Yellow throat 



u. Yellow-breasted Chat 
Wilsons Warbler 



House Sparrow 
Western MeadowLark* 
Yellow-headed Blackbird 
Red-winged Blackbird 
Brewer's Blackbird 
Brown-headed Cowbird 
Bullock's Oriole 



PREFERRED HABITAT 
Deciduous Forest 
Brush Areas 
Stream Bottoms 
Streams 

Stream Bottoms 
Coniferous Forest 

Mixed Forest 
Fresh-water Marsh 

Moist Thickets 

Deciduous Areas 

Residential, Farm 

Open Areas 

Fresh-water Marshes 

Fres -water Marsh 

Fields & Farms 

Fields & Farms 

Valleys -water 



STATUS 

Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Winter Visitor 
Resident 
Winter Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 
Resident 
Resident 
Summer Resident 
Resident 
Resident 
Summer Resident 
Summer Resident 



ABUNDANCE 

Common 

Common 

Common 

Common 

Common 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 

Common 

Uncommon 

Common 

Very Common 

Common 

Uncommon 

Very Common 

Very Common 

Uncommon 

Rare 



*State Bird 



SC-WM&B-27-1974 



OTHER BIRDS 



COMMON NAME 



Western Tanager 



Black-headed grosbeak 
Evening grosbeak 
Lazuli bunting 
Purple finch 

House Finch 

Pine Siskin 

American Gold Finch 

Lesser Goldfinch 
"— • Rufous-sided Towbee 

Savannah sparrow 
' Vasper Sparrow 

Lark sparrow 

Slate-colored junco 

Oregon junco 

Chipping Sparrow 



\*1 



PREFERRED HABITAT 

Coniferous Forest 

Deciduous Forest 

Coniferous Mixed Forest 

Thickets 

Conif. & Hardwood Forest 

Residential, Farms 

Coniferous & Hard. Forest 

Grassy Areas 

Grassy Areas 

Thickets 

Open Fields & Prairie 

Fields, Farms 

Forest Edge 

Bruxh, Forest Edge 

Conif. & Dec. Forest 

All open Areas 



STATUS 

Summer Resident 

Summer Resident 

Resident 

Summer Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Summer Resident 

Summer Resident 

Winter Visitors 

Resident 

Summer Resident 



ABUNDANCE 

Common 

Common 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 

Common 

Common 

Common 

Uncommon 

Very Common 

Very Common 

Uncommon 

Accidental 

Rare 

Very Common 

Uncommon 



SC-WM&B-28-1974 



REPTILES 



All reptiles 



found in the following list are year around residents to the Planning Unit 



COMMON NAME 



Western pond turtle 

Western Fence lizard 

Western Skink 

Northern alligator Liz. 

Rubber snake (Boa) 

Western rattle snake 

Racer Snake 
/ Western ring-neck Snake 
^ Gopher Snake 

Common garter snake 

Northwestern garter S. 

Western Terr. Garter S. 



SCIENTIFIC 


NAME 




C 1 e rnmys 


marmora ta 




Sceloporus 


occidental 


is 


Eumeces 


s ki 


ltonianus 




Gerrhono 


tus 


coeruleus 





PREFERRED HABITAT 



Charina bottae 
Crotalus viridis 
Coluber constrictor 
Diadophis ambilis 
Pituophis melanoleucus 
Thamnophis sir talis 
Thamnophis ordinoirdes 
Thamnophis elegans 



Streams, Ponds, Water always 
Forest Floor & Rocky areas 
Mixed Forest, rotten logs 
Mixed Forest, Brush, Damp Areas 
Coniferous Forests, Damp Areas 
Brushy, rocky forest edge 
Brushy Areas, Meadows 
Mixed Forest, Under debris 
Mixed Forest, Brush 
Along or in Streams, Meadows 
Clear Cut areas, Damp Areas 
Streams with Brush banks 



ABUNDANCE 

Occasiona 1 

Common 

Common 

Common 

Occasiona 1 

Occasional 

Uncommon 

Common 

Common 

Very Common 

Common 

Common 



SC-WM&B-29-1974 



AMPHIBIANS 



All amphibians found in the list are year around residents to the Planning Unit. 



COMMON NAME 



Long-toed salamander 

Northwestern Salamander 

t 

Pacific giant Salamander 

Olympic Salamander 

Rough-skinned newt 

Del Norte Salamander 
^ Dunn's Salamander 
*4 W, Red-backed Salamander 

California Slender Sal. 

Tailed Frog 

Pacific Tree frog 

Red-legged frog 

Yellow- legged frog 

Bull frog 

Western Toad 



SCIENTIFIC NAME 
Ambystoma macrodactylum 
Amby stoma gracile 
Dicamptodon ensatus 
Rhyocotriton olynipicus 
Taricha granulosa 



Plethodon elongatus 



Plethodan dunni 
Plethodon vehiculum 
Batrachoseps attenuatus 
Ascaphus truei 
Hyla regiila 
Rana Aurora 



Rana bog lei 
Rana catesbeiana 
Bufo boreas 



PREFERRED HABITAT 
Rotting wood, ponds 
Streams, under wood 
Coniferous forests, cool 
Near Streams, shaded 
Mixed Forests, near streams 
Streams, Rocks, moss 
mossy rocks near streams 
Streams, under litter 
Coniferous Forest, Moist 
Streams if cold 
Near Water & Brush 
Near Damp Beg. ponds 
Slow streams, Rocky 
Quiet Water 
Near Water - not specific 



ABUNDANCE 

Common 

Common 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 

Very Common 

Common 

Common 

Fairly Common 

Uncommon 

Uncommon 

Common 

Uncommon i 

Common 

Fairly Common 

Fairly Common 



SC-WM&B-30-1974 



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APPENDIX IX 



PHASES AND DISCRETE OPERATIONS OF OIL 



AND GAS OPERATIONS CONSIDERED IN THIS ANALYSIS 



33$' 



OIL AND GAS OPERATIONS CONSIDERED IN THIS ANALYSIS 

List of Phases and Discrete Operations 
of Oil and Gas Operations Considered in this Analysis 



Phase - Preliminary Investigations 

Discrete Operations - Airborne, truck mounted thumper, 

Road Construction 



Phase - Exploratory Drilling 



Discrete Operations 



Move-in of drilling equipment, Use of existing 
roads and sites for drilling, improvement of 
existing roads or sites for drilling, road 
construction, site construction, drilling, mud 
pits, mud additives, water supply, storage tanks 
and related facilities. 



Phase - Development - Oil Field 

Discrete Operations - Those operations considered in exploratory 

drilling. Well spacing possibilities (40-80 
acres per well), flowlines, injection wells, 
separators, additional area and roads needed 
as compared to exploratory drilling. 

Phase - Development - Gas Field 



Discrete Operations 



The operations considered in exploratory 
drilling and oil field development are considered 
in gas field development. Additional and/or 
different operations than above are well spacing 
of 160 acres per well, no storage tanks needed, 
transmission pipelines needed. 



Phase - Production - Oil § Gas Fields 



Discrete Operations 



Flowing wells, pumping wells, flowlines - sur- 
face, flowlines - subsurface, separators, heaters, 
disposal of produced saline and/or fresh water, 
water flooding, miscible flooding, transpor- 
tation from field - truck (oil) , pipelines (gas) . 



&7 



Phase - Abandonment - Exploratory Wells, Production Fields 

Discrete Operations - Plugging, casing, marking location of abandoned 

wells, flowlines removed or left in place, removal 
of facilities, restoration of cleared areas, and 
abandoned roads. 



3?4 



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APPENDIX X 



TABLE A - WELL FIRES AND BLOWOUTS 



DURING FISCAL YEAR 1975 



TABLE B - CRUDE OIL SPILLS DURING OIL 



AND GAS DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCTION 



ACTIVITIES IN FIVE WESTERN STATES IN 1972 



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TABLE A 






WELL 


FIRES 


AND BLOWOUTS DURING FISCAL 


YEAR 




1975* (10,092 FEDERAL 


LEASES) 








Fires 










Wyoming 

Oklahoma 

Mississippi 


■ 7 
- 2 

■ 1 





July 1, 1974 - June 30, 1975 



10 



Blowouts 

Wyoming - 2 

New Mexico - 4 

Colorado - 2 

Utah - 1 

California - 1 



10 



3W 



TABLE B 



^ 
•^ 

^ 



Crude Oil Spills During Oil and Gas Development and Production Activities in 

Five Western States in 1972 



Tot 


al 


Total Barrels 1/ 


State Reported 


Spilled 


Colorado 


37 


896 


Montana 


27 


1,960 


N. Dakota 


19 


813 


Wyoming 


74 


9,676 


Utah 


16 


1,434 











Number of Spills 


Average Number 






per 100 


of 




Wells in 


2/ 


Wells in 


Barrels per 


Spill 


Production 


Production 


24 




2,700 




1.4 


73 




4,210 




0.6 


42 




1,490 




1.3 


131 




9,300 




0.8 


90 




900 




1.8 



1/ 646 bbls will cover one acre to a depth of 1 inch (646 bbl = 1 acre-inch) 
2/ 1971 figures. 

Source: Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8, Denver, Colorado 



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APPENDIX XI 

LETTER AND NEWS RELEASES REQUESTING 
PUBLIC PARTICIPATION, MAILING LIST OF 
GROUPS, AGENCIES AND INDIVIDUALS 



ns 



BLM seeks 
comments 



Empire 

1 - 5- 76 



Public comments about the environ- 
mental impacts of proposed oil and gas 
leasing are invited by the Bureau of Land 
Management (BLM), according to Ed- 
ward G. Stauber, Coos Ba.y District 
manager. . • 

He noted that 27 oil and gas lease 
applications, covering approximately 49,- 
000 acres in the Coos Bay district are 
awaiting action. The lands are located as 
follows:']) just east of Loon Lake in T. 23 
S., R. 9 W., 2) the Callahan area in T. 26 
S., R. 8 W., and 3) the Coquille River 
area, in four townships stiualed approxi- 
mately 20 miles east of Coquille. Prior to 
issuance or rejection of the applications, 
an environmental analysis will be made of 
the probable impact of leasing. 

"We will appreciate receiving factual 
information concerning the net impact on 
the environment which likely would result 
if oil and gas leases were issued, 
exploration conducted, ' and production 
undertaken,"' Stauber said. He added 
that comments could be most useful if 
received before the end of February as ' 
BLM's analysis proceeds. Factors to be 
considered include impacts on air, land, 
water, plants, animals, , ecological pro- 
cesses, landscape character, sociocultural 
interest, and others. 

Environmental analysis records relat- 
ing to oil and gas leasing are being 
prepared in each of seven BLM districts 
in Oregon where oil and gas lease 
applications have'been filed. ' 









-- =tf-- : i- ' 


--- :'"'•& 


■ ;.v';*' 


r^? 


'*?-&!%£ 








-■ *" -*'{? - * ~ 


*-~-e *y~?- 


.. . W! s» C- 











•■%. 



■ii\ ^":- " 



'.-3 









J?S 







IN REPLY REFER TO 



United States Department of the Interior 



BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 

Coos Bay District Office 

P. 0. Box 1139 

Coos Bay, OR 97420 



JAN 2 7 1976 



Robert R. Van Leer 
510 North Ellensburg 
Gold Beach, OR 97444 

Dear Mr. Van Leer: 

The Coos Bay District Office of the Bureau of Land Management is in the 
process of preparing an environmental analysis concerning the effect of 
oil and gas leasing and possible development on the approximate area of 
the enclosed map. There are 27 pending oil and gas lease applications 
covering approximately 49,000 acres on the Coos Bay District. 

Factors which will be considered in the preparation of the environmental 
analysis document include impacts on air, land, water, terrestrial and 
aquatic plants and animals, ecological processes, landscape character, 
sociocultural interests, and others. If you have any comments on the 
effect of oil and gas leasing on the environment of this area, we would 
appreciate your comments by February 26, 1976. 

If this letter generates sufficient interest and comment to justify a 
public meeting, a meeting will be held. Your comments are welcomed. 



Sincerely yours, 




District Manager 



Enclosure: 

Map of Approximate 
Lease Application Areas 



CONSERVE 
AMERICA'S 
ENERGY 




Save Energy and You Serve America! 



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United Slates Department of the Interior 

: BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 

- '.'■.' Coos Bay District . ,'.-.' 

' - '. . 333 "South Fourth. Street '.'.'. 

■ .. ' ' ; P. 0. Box 1139 

'/.."-"'. " ■- Coos' Bay, OR 97-120 *' " - * S 

' .'" ','■'" . Phone: 269-5880 '..'."■ .' ,' *» 
'-'-•■■" -* " ■ . . '. 

' COOS B AY DISTRICT MULTIPLE USE ADVISORY BOARD • 
.'. ",:••" Term ending December 31, 1975 ' • " : •."■' 



Interests 
Represented 

Recreation 



Wildlife 



Members 



"/"Edwin A. Troyer 



/-. 



Ronald R. Carpani 



Addres ses . ' ; 

705 South Broadway 
Coos Bay, OR 97420 

School District #9 
Coos Bay, OR 97420 



/- . 



Timber 



Agriculture 



Timber 



' J. 'Daisy Brannian 



V 



/Harold L. Knapp 



yK. P. Stinchfield 



Land Use "Planning .'. ,-Flora L. Burch 

Environmental. ^William D. Arbus. 
Education 



■County Government Claude EV-Wa-ldrop " 



Reedsport Mill Co., Inc. 
P. O. Box 146 
Reedsport, OR 97467 

P. 0. Box 678 

Port Orford, OR 97465 

P. O. Box 583 •--• " ' 
North Bend,- OR 97459 "v 



9394 Coast Highway- • " 
.North Bend, OR 97459 

Terramar-Camp Arago 

Nichols Road. 

Coos Bay, OR 97420 ', 

Coos County Courthouse 
Coquille, OR 97423 . 





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Business 



Publ 



1C 



"^-Charles A. "Tresidder P. 0. Box 1099 

. /. •' " . ■ ■' '■ ';. Coos Bay, OR 97420 

-. " .' v ". ■ •''■• '" ' 

y Robert R. Van Leer 510 North Ellensburg 

• . • ' • -- • . '""" • Gold Beach,- OR 97444 



IP 



IN REPLY REFER TO: 



1784 - 12 



Telephones 

(Bus) 267-463 2 

(Res) 756-6152 

(Bus) 267-3104 

(Res) 267-7138 

(Bus) 271-2460 

(Res) 271-2767 



(Res) 332-6292 

.(Bus) .7 56-5171 

(Res) 756-4850 

(Res) 759-3372 

(Res) 759-3460 



(Bus) C83-4753 
(Res) 756-4261 



(Bus) 396-3121 
(Bus) 269-5713 
(Res) 347-2941 



(Bus) 269-5171 

(Res) 267-2706 

(Bus) 247-6643 

(Res) 247-7275 



'3Y7 ■ 






Cj 



)fe 



ATE AGENCIES - OREGON 



James E. Sexson, Director 
Water Resources Department 
1158 Chemeketa Street, NE 
Salem, OR 97310 

Administrator 

Oregon Dept . of Environmental Quality 

1234 SW Morrison (P.O. Box 231) 

Portland, OR' 97204 

229-5395 

'John IV. McKean, Director 
Oregon Fish § Wildlife Commission 
P.O. Box 3503 
Portland, OR 97208 

Raymond E. Corcoran, State Geologist 

Oregon Dept. of Geology § Mineral Industries 

1069 State Office Bldg. 

Portland, OR 97201 

229-5580 

^icnorable Bob Straub 
p^Pvernor of Oregon 

208 State Capitol 

Salem, Oregon 97310 

STATE LEGISLATURE 

Jason Boe 
2078 Hawthorne 
Reedsport, OR 97467 



William S. Cox, Director 
Division of State Lands 
1445 State Street 
Salem, OR 97310 

Janet McLennan 

Assistant to Governor, Natural 

Resources 
109 State Capitol 
Salem, OR 97310 
378-3109 

Lesilie Lehmann 
State Clearing House 
240 Cottage Street, NE 
Salem, OR 97310 
378-3732 



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Jack D. Ripper 

Box 489 

North Bend, OR 



97459 



William N. Grannell 
438 Northwood Road 
North Bend, OR 97459 



Ed Stevenson 

933 South First Avenue 

Coquille, OR 97423 



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LOGGING/ LUMBER FIRMS 

/ Elkside Lumber Co. 
P. 0. Box 107 
Lakeside, OR 97449 

/ Georgia-Pacific Corporation 
P. 0. Box 610 
Coquille, OR 97423 

International Paper Company 
P. 0. Box 43 
Gardiner, OR 97441 

/ Menasha Corporation 
P.O. Box 588 
North Bend, OR 97459 

/ftoseburg Lumber Co. 
P. 0. Box 218 
Coquille, OR 97423 

y Champion International Corporation 
P. 0. Box 10228 
Eugene, OR 97401 

Weyerhaeuser Company 
/ P. 0. Box 389 

North Bend, OR 97459 

D. § F. Logging, Inc. 
/P. 0. Box 460 
Elkton, OR 97436 

Ben Henderson Logging 
/ /3l44 Maple Drive 
Reedsport, OR 97467 

Leep Logging Corp. 
/?. 0. Box 398 

Myrtle Point, OR 97458 

Moore Mill 8, Lumber Co. 
/P. 0. Box 277 
Bandon, OR 97411 

Standley Logging Co. 
/ Route 1, Box 65 

Camas Valley, OR 97416 



Coos Head Timber Company 
/P. 0. Box 750 
Coos Bay, OR 97420 

Reedsport Mill Company, Inc. 
^P. 0. Box 146 

Reedsport, OR 97467 

Faye Stewart v 

Bohemia, Inc. 

P. 0. Box 1819 

Eugene, Or 9740J <?7</<? / 



Roseburg Lumber Co. 
P. 0. Box 1088 
Roseburg, OR 97470 



I 



317 



^> 



INTEREST GROUPS 

w Joe Walicki, Oregon Representative 
Wilderness Society 
/ Box 533 
Eugene, OR 97401 
686-0185" 

Izaak Walton League 
James A. Potter, Secretary 
P.O. Box 58 
Gladstone, OR 97027 

Museum of Natural History 
University of Oregon 
Eugene, OR 97403 

Corvallis Center for Environmental 

Services 
Student Activity Center 
Oregon State University 
Corvallis, OR 97330 



jp 



Mr. Edward C. Rochette 
NW Environmental Defense Center 
10015 SW Terwilliger Blvd. 
Portland, OR 97215 

Michael Storper, Conservation Assist. 

Friends of the Earth, Inc. 

529 Commercial 

San Francisco, CA 94111 



Bob Wazeka 

Oregon Conservation Coordinator 

Sierra Club, Pacific NW Chapter 

2728 Baker Blvd. 

Eugene, OR 97403 

342-7805 

Thomas Vaughan, Director 
Oregon Historical Society 
1230 SW Park Avenue 
Portland, OR 97205 

SW Oregon Chapter 

Northwestern Steelheaders Council of 

Trout Unlimited 
Pi O. Box 852 
Coos Bay, OR 97420 

Audubon Society of Oregon 
515 NW Cornell Road 
Portland, OR 97210 

Environmental Studies Center 
University of Oregon 
Eugene, OR 97403 

Oregon State University 

Water Resources Research Institute 

Air Resources Center 
Covell Hall 115 
Corvallis, OR 97331 

Mervyn L. Filipponi 

Extension Service, Peavy Hall ^f*5 

Corvallis, OR 97331 



Lawrence F. Williams 
Executive Director 
Oregon Environmental Council 
2637 SE Water Avenue 
Portland, OR 97201 

Steve McCarthy 

Oregon Student Public Interest 

Research Group (0SPIRG) 
408 SW 2nd Street 
Portland, OR 97204' 



Keep Oregon Green Association 

O. Box 471 
2750 State Street 
Salem, OR 97308 



George Reed, Executive Director 
Oregon Wildlife Federation 
Box 12438 
Portland, OR 97212 

Survival Center, ASUO 
Suite 1 EMU 
University of Oregon 
Eugene, OR 97403 

Bill Eklund 

Oregon High Desert Study Group 

1798 Columbia 

Eugene, OR 97403 

686-3845 



3SV 



CONGRESSIONAL ' 

Senator Hark 0. Hatfield 
U. S. Senate 

463 Russell Office Bldg. 
Washington, D.C. 20510 

Senator Robert W. Packwood 
U. S. Senate. 

6327 New Senate Office Bldg. 
Washington, D.C. 20510 

Rep. Les AuCoin 
House of Representatives 
329 Cannon House Office Bldg, 
Washington, D. C. 20515 



Rep. Al Ullman 

House of Representatives 

2410 Rayburn House Office Bldg. 

Washington, D.C. 20515 

Rep. Robert Duncan 
House of Representatives 
330 Cannon House Office Bldg. 
Washington, D.C. 20515 

Rep. James Weaver 

House of Representatives 

1723 Longworth House Office Bldg. 

Washington, D. C. 20515 



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PRIVATE FIRMS 

Requests for information and comments should be sent to all oil and 
gas lease applicants in each area. 

Mr. Henry W. Wright 
Western Oil & Gas Association 
609 South Grand Avenue 
Los Angeles, €a44f. 90017 



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SUP PLEMENTA L OIL 5 G AS LEA SING COORDINATION LIST 



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FEDERAL AGENCIES 



Special Assistant to the Secretary- 
Pacific Northwest Region 
P.O. Box 3621 
Portland, OR 97208 
234-3361, ext. 5141 

F.J. Schambeck, Oil § Gas Supervisor 

Pacific Area, U.S. Geological Survey 

7744 Federal Bldg. 

300 North Los Angeles Street 

Los Angeles, CA 90012 

James' L. Agee, Administrator 

Environmental Protection Agency 

Region X 

1-200 - Sixth Avenue 

Seattle, WA 98101 



r Donald Hodel, Administrator 
Bonneville Power Administration 
1002 NE Holladay Street 
P.O. Box 3621 
Portland, OR 97208 
234-3361, ext. 5101 • 

Doris Koivula 

Chief, Branch-of Upland Leasing (721) 

Bureau of Land Management 

18th and C Streets, NW 

Washington, D.C. 20240 

A.J. Webber, State Conservationist 
Soil Conservation Service 
1218 SW Washington 
Portland, OR 97205 



Ed Montgomery, Chief, Branch of 

Energy and Minerals 
Denver Federal Center 
Building 50 
Denver, CO 80225 

Charles Shipp 

Section of Powersite Lands 

Bureau of Power 

Federal Power Commission 

825 N. Capitol Street 

Washington, D.C. 20426 

Donald H. Reese, Regional Supervisor 

Division of River Basin Studies 

Fish and Wildlife Service 

1500 NE Irving Street 

P.O. Box 3737 

Portland, OR 97208 

234-3361, ext. 5263 

John Welch, Realty Specialist 
Bureau of Reclamation - Box 043 
Boise, Ida-fee 83724 
LP 

T.A. Schlapfer,- Regional -Fori :. er 
Forest Service, USDA - Region 
Attention: Zean Moore 
P.O.. Box 3623 ..: 
Portland, OR 97208 







3S'7^ 






|Q& 



OUNTY AGENCIES 



£>><>£ County Commissioners (3 copies) 
Coos County Courthouse , 
Coquille, OR 97423 ?yt.£i{tfr^ 



Douglas County Commissioners 
Douglas County Courthouse 
Roseburg, OR 97470 y* 



(3 copies] 



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Coos County Economic Development & Coordinating Committee 
c/o Secretary, Cal Heckard 
Coos Bay-North Bend Water Board 
2305 Ocean Boulevard 
Coos Bay, OR 97420 



Coos-Curry-Douglas Economic Improvement Association 
c/o Executive Director, Tony Kuhn 
874 S.E. Steven 
Roseburg, OR 97470 



POSTMASTER 



'^p 



BROADBENT. OR 97414 
BANDON, Otf 97411 

COQUILLE, OR 97423 

COOS BAY, OR 97420 

ELKTON, OR 97436 ' 

FAIRVIEW, OR 97024 

MYRTLE POINT, OR 97458 

REEDSPORT, OR 97467 

REMOTE, OR 97468 

SCOTT SBURG, OR 97474 

POWERS, OR 97466 



Planning Department 
Coos County Courthouse 
Coquille, OR 97423 

Planning Department 
Douglas County Courthouse 
Roseburg, OR 97470 



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3S'5> 



I 



APPENDIX XII 



STATEWIDE OVERVIEW OF POSSIBLE 



DEVELOPMENT ON FEDERAL OIL 



AND GAS LEASES IN OREGON 



3SS 




I 



STATEWIDE OVERVIBV OF POSSIBLE 

DEVELOPMENT ON FEDERAL OIL 

AMD GAS LEASES IN OREGON 

Introduction 

This appendix is an overview of the development which could occur on 
Federal oil and gas leases in Oregon. The number and location of 
leases and pending applications in the State are described; and the 
possible levels of ensuing oil and gas exploration and production 
activities are considered. 

The anticipated environmental effects of exploration and production 
activities are analyzed in the main body of environmental analysis 
records prepared for individual blocks of lease applications. 

If commercial quantities of oil or gas are found in the State, trans- 
portation facilities would be required; and discoveries of oil could 
lead to the construction or enlargement of refineries. Analysis of 
the environmental effects of transportation and refining facilities 
is beyond the scope of the environmental analyses of the lease applica- 
tions. However, the potential for, and possible magnitude of, pipeline 
and refinery construction are examined in this appendix. The principal 
environmental permit and certification processes required of proposed 
pipeline and refinery projects in Oregon are also described. 

As of February 9, 1976, 212 applications for Federal oil and gas leases 
were on file in Oregon. The applications covered 387,636 acres. In 
addition, 193,467 acres were already under lease. The total area 
included in both existing leases and pending applications was 581,103 
acres. Areas containing Federal leases and pending lease applications 
in Oregon are shown in Figure 1. 

Exploratory Drilling 

If pending lease applications were approved, at least four or five 
exploratory wells probably would be drilled on Federal or intermingled 
private or State land during the next several years. If early tests 
were favorable, 20 or more wildcat wells might be drilled on lease 
blocks containing Federal lands. 

Many Federal oil and gas leases expire without being explored for oil 
and gas. This is particularly true outside areas classified by the 
U.S. Geological Survey as known geologic structures. Since there are 
no known geologic structures in Oregon, exploratory oil and gas wells 
probably would be drilled on a relatively small percentage of the 
leases during the next several years. If oil or gas were discovered, 
additional exploratory wells would be drilled. 



3S7 







mm Leased 

Application 

i- Not all federal 
lands in shaded 
areas are leosed 
or under pending 
application. 



FIGURE I Areas conto 



ning F- J «ral Oil ond Gas Leases and Pending Application for Federal Oil ond Gas Leases 
in Oregon, as of February 9, 1976. 



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The petroleum industry's interest in exploration for oil and gas in 
Oregon has fluctuated over the years, but it now appears to be increasing 
One indication of industry interest in the State is the acreage of Federal 
oil and gas leases. The total area included in Federal leases in Oregon 
dropped from a peak of 1,079,740 acres in 1956 to 22,892 acres in 1967. 
Since 1967, the acreage leased or under application has risen steadily* 
in early 1976, it stood at 581,103 acres. Oil companies also were reported 
to be leasing substantial areas of private land in 1975 and early 1976 
particularly in the Willamette Valley. ' 

Exploration activities increased in the State in 1975, and it appears that 
the momentum will extend at least through the next two to three years 
Mobil Oil, the major applicant for Federal leases in western Oregon, 
conducted geophysical and geochemical sampling surveys in the State! 
Reichold Energy Corporation and Northwest Natural Gas Company drilled 
four dry holes in western Oregon in 1975 in search of natural gas. 

The number and location of lease and lease application blocks provide 
a general indication of the number and location of exploratory wells 
which might be drilled during the next several years. Identification of 
lease blocks in some areas is complicated by the intermingling of lease- 
holds and lease applications of two or more companies. However, there 
appear to be about 15 lease or lease application blocks on Federal lands 
in the State at the present time. 

If the first well drilled in a lease block is unsuccessful, it might be 
the only well drilled in the block during the current cycle of exploratory 
activity. Many years may pass before the current or a succeeding lessee 
concludes that another well is warranted. Wells might not be drilled in 
some blocks if exploration of nearby blocks is unsuccessful. Other blocks 
might remain unexplored because of the inability of the lessee to secure 
financing for a drilling operation. In a large block held by a large 
company, two or more dry holes might be drilled before drilling operations 
are stopped. 

Almost all of the pending lease applications for Federal lands in western 
Oregon were filed by Mobil Oil; and if a significant portion of the appli- 
cations is approved, it is likely that more than one exploratory well 
will be drilled in the company's large lease block. A petroleum engineer 
for the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries believes that 
the company is planning to drill several deep test holes in the next two 
to three years. (1) 

Approximately one acre is required for the drill pad for an exploratory well. 
Somewhat more land would be needed on sloping land. On a well-per-well 
basis, more land might be disturbed in the construction of drill pads in 
western than in eastern Oregon. Because of the road system already developed 
to harvest timber and the cost of road construction in steep terrain, most 
wildcat wells in western Oregon probably would be drilled in locations which 
minimize the need for temporary access roads. In eastern Oregon, wildcat 
wells would be more likely to require the construction of access roads. . 



35f 



Oil and Gas Production 

Recent experience of the oil and gas industry in the United States may- 
provide a general indication of the possible outcome of oil and gas 
exploration in Oregon. As indicated in Table 1, the chances of dis- 
covering a significant recoverable reserve of oil or gas in the nation 
in 1974 were approximately 1 in every 59 new-field wildcat wells drilled. 
When a significant discovery was made in 1974, the odds were greater than 
9 to 1 that the area of the field would be less than 2 square miles. 



TABLE 1 



NEW-FIELD WILDCAT WELLS DRILLED IN U.S. IN 1974: 
NUMBER AND PERCENT OF DRY HOLES 
AND PRODUCERS BY CLASS OF OIL AND G-\S FIELD 



1/ 


Total Recoverable 3/ 
Reserves by Field 
Class 


Area of Oil 


. Fields 1/ 


Number and Percent of 2/ 


Class 
of 


Denver - 
Julesburg 
Basin. Co. 


Cali- 
fornia 
eSq. Ml.) 


New-Field Wildcats 
Drilled in 1974, 


Field 


Oil 
■ (MilOrls.) 


Gas 
(BillTCu.Ft.) 


by Field Class 




(Sq. Mi.) 


Number 


Percent 


I. Producers 
A. Significa 


Qt 


+300 
150-300 
60-150 
6-60 

Less than 6 


9.7 
5.2 
1.4 

0.6 


1.7 
1.1 

0.4 

0.2 


805 
(96) 



1 

7 

88 

707 
2 

4847 

5652 


14.24 
(1.70) 


A 
B 
G 
D 

B. Not 

Significa 


+50 

25-50 

10-25 

1-10 

nt 




0.02 
0.12 
1.56 


E 


Less than 1 


12.51 


F 


Abandoned 


S. in 1974 




0.3 


II. Dry Holes 
Total New-F 


ield Wildcats Drilled in U. 


85.76 
100.00 



1/ H. W. Menard and G. Sharmen. 1975. "Scientific Uses of Random Drilling 
Models." Science . Vol. 190, No. 4212. 

2/ F. J. Wagner, 1975. "North American Drilling Activity in 1974." Bulletin 
of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists . Vol. 58, 1273. 

3/ Field classifications and "significance" criteria established by American 
Association of Petroleum Geologists. 



J?£D 



D 



All of the 189 oil and gas wells drilled in Oregon since 1902 have been 
dry holes. In the opinion of the staff of the Oregon Department of Geology 
and Mineral Industries, however, "There is still potential for finding 
deposits of oil and gas in Oregon in spite of many past drilling failures 
.... Results of deep drilling have been generally discouraging, but 
they have shown that there is a thick section of marine sedimentary rocks 
and that at many locations porous and permeable sands exist within the 
stratigraphic section." (2) Past drilling in the State has produced 
numerous shows of oil and gas, but none has been in commercial quantities. 

One indication of the chances of discovering commercial quantities of oil 
and gas in Oregon may be the discovery rate for all new- field wildcat wells 
in the country. As indicated in Table 1, of the 5652 new-field wildcat 
wells drilled in the United States in 1974, 805- -or one in seven- -were 
finished as producers. However, only 96- -or one in 59- -resulted in the 
discovery of fields with significant recoverable reserves. (3) The American 
Association of Petroleum Geologists considers significant reserves to be 
those over one million barrels, the amount required to meet the country's 
petroleum demand for one and one-half hours. The percentage of significant 
oil or gas finds in total new-field wildcat wells drilled in the United 
States declined from over three percent in the late 1940 's to 1.7 percent 
in 1974.(4) 

Recent drilling experience also provides an indication of the size of 
field most likely to be discovered. Over the years, a growing percentage 
of the significant discoveries has been in smaller fields. In the late 
1940' s, 20 to 25 percent of the significant oil and gas discoveries were 
in Class "D" fields, the smallest fields in the American Association of 
Petroleum Geologists' rankings. (5) As indicated in Table 1, 88 of the 96 
significant new-field discoveries in 1974, or 92 percent, were in Class 
"D" fields. From 1968 to 1974, 84 percent of the signficant discoveries 
were in Class "D" fields. 

Table 1 also relates classes of oil and gas fields, as determined by total 
recoverable reserves, to the area of oil fields in Colorado and California. 
Class "D" fields average approximately one-half square mile in California 
and one and one-half square miles in the Denver -Jul esburg Basin in Colorado. 
The average sizes of the fields in each class in the Denver-Julesburg 
Basin approximate those for the nation as a whole. (6) 

It appears, therefore, that if oil or gas is found in Oregon, the chances 
are better than even that the field will be less than two square miles in 
size. 

The American Association of Petroleum Geologists refers to Class "A" oil 
and gas fields as "giants." From 1968 to 1974, only 3.1 percent of the 
significant discoveries in the United States was in giant fields. No 
giant fields were discovered in the country in 1973 and 1974 (1975 data are 
not available) . (7) Although the chances of a giant field being discovered 
in Oregon are probably slight, the possibility remains. Examples of large 



sy i 



oil fields in California include the 46-square mile Midway Sunset and 
60-square mile Elk Hills fields. The Rio Vista and Sutter Buttes fields 
are large gas fields in California; both are approximately one square 
township, or 36 square miles, in area. (8) 

The amount of land used in a field for roads, well sites, and other oil 
and gas field facilities depends largely upon the well spacing pattern. 
Gas wells tend to be more widely spaced than oil wells. Typical spacing 
patterns in recently developed fields in California are 10 acres per well 
in oil fields and 160 acres per well in gas fields. (9) In the Rocky 
Mountain area, spacing patterns range from 40 to 160 acres per well in 
most oil fields developed in recent years and from 160 to 640 acres per 
well in gas fields. (10) 

The administrative rules of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral 
Industries require a minimum spacing pattern of 40 acres per well unless 
a different spacing pattern is approved by the department's governing 
board. 

With a 40-acre-per-well spacing pattern, approximately 12.8 acres per 
square mile may be used for well sites, roads, and other facilities; with 
a 320-acre-per-well spacing pattern, about 6.4 acres per square mile may 
be used. 

If a small, two-square mile field is discovered in Oregon, the amount of 
land used in the field may range from approximately 13 to more than 25 
acres. If a large, 50-square mile field is discovered, more than 640 
acres may be used for roads, well sites, and other facilities. 

Transportation and Refining Facilities 

If commercial quantities of natural gas were discovered in Oregon, it 
probably would be sold to natural gas utilities with marketing areas or 
pipelines in the vicinity of the gas fields. The boundaries of Oregon's 
natural gas utility districts and major pipeline routes are shown in 
Figure 2. (The West Coast leg of the proposed Alaska Natural Gas Trans- 
portation System natural gas pipeline would parallel all but 21.4 miles 
of the existing Pacific Gas Transmission Company route shown on the map) . 
Except for those in southeastern Oregon, the lease and lease application 
blocks are located within a relatively short distance of major existing 
natural gas pipelines. 

If the route of a proposed gas pipeline crossed Federal lands, the land- 
administering agency would prepare an environmental assessment or analysis 
record before issuing a right-of-way. (The environmental impacts of flow- 
lines--as distinct from pipelines- -constructed on the leasehold to carry 
gas from the wellhead to a central collection point would be analyzed by 
the U.S. Geological Survey and the land-administering agency after the 
lessee submitted a proposed surface use plan for the leasehold.) If 
anticipated environmental impacts of the proposed pipeline or public 
interest were determined to be significant, an environmental impact 
statement would be prepared. 



Slat 



FIGURE 2 



OREGON NATURAL GA5 
UTILITY DISTRICTS? PI PEL1NE5 

1973 





NORTHWEST CALIFORNIA- CASCADE NORTHWEST PACIFIC 
NATURAL GAS PACIFIC NATURAL PIPELINE TRANSMISSION 

NATURAL GAS GAS COMPANY COMPANY 



SOURCE: Oregon Office of Energy Research and Planning, 

Transition :. A Report to the Oregon Energy Council. 
January 1, J975. 

3& 



8 

In 1975, the Oregon Legislature passed legislation requiring proponents 
of natural gas pipelines 16 inches or greater in diameter and 5 miles or 
longer in length to obtain a site certificate from the Oregon Energy 
Facility Siting Council. The certificate is to contain conditions "for 
the protection of public health and safety." The council is authorized 
to commission a study of "any aspect of the proposed energy facility. "(11) 
The Oregon Department of Energy, the Council's administrative arm, pub- 
lished draft site certificate application rules for pipelines in February 
1976. The proposed rules would require pipeline proponents to describe 
the environmental impacts of the proposed pipeline. 

The Office of Pipeline Safety, U.S. Department of Transportation, and the 
Oregon Public Utility Commission regulate the construction and operation 
of gas pipelines to insure safety standards are met. 

Oil produced on Federal leases in Oregon could be refined (a) within the 
State at existing refineries, refineries now being planned, or refineries 
built specifically to refine crude oil produced in the State; or (b) in 
neighboring states such as California or Washington. 

At the present time, there are three small refineries in Oregon: all are 
located in Portland (12) : 

Company Capacity 

Chevron Asphalt 18,000 barrels asphalt per day 

Nu-Way Oil 2,000 barrels lubricants per day 

Ager § Davis Refining 3,500 barrels mixed grade oil per day 

Plans have been ammounced for three new refineries in the State (13) : 

Proposed Proposed 

Company Location Capacity 

Columbia Independent Refiners Portland 50,000 barrels per day 
Cascade Energy Rainier 30,000 barrels per day 

Charter Energy St. Helens 52,400 barrels per day 

If oil were produced in Oregon, it might replace some of the feed stocks 
which the new refineries would otherwise have to import from outside the 
State . 

If oil produced in Oregon were not refined within the State, it probably 
would be transported either to refineries in the Puget Sound area in 
Washington or to California. At present, about 60 percent of the 
petroleum products consumed in Oregon are refined in the Puget Sound 
area. (14) 

Unlike natural gas, many miles of new pipeline might be constructed to 
transport oil produced in the State. There are two petroleum product 
pipelines but no crude oil pipelines in the State. Other transportation 
modes might also be used. 



3^ 



9 

The site certification process cited previously for natural gas pipelines 
in Oregon also applies to crude oil and petroleum product pipelines six 
inches or greater in diameter and five miles or longer in length. If a 
proposed petroleum pipeline crossed Federal lands, the environmental 
impacts of the pipeline would be assessed by the land-administering 
agency. 

At the present time, the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council's site 
certification process for energy facilities does not apply to refineries. (15) 
However, before a refinery could be built in Oregon, air contaminant and 
waste discharge permits would be required from the Oregon Department of 
Environmental Quality. 

Air Contaminant Discharge Permit : In addition to requiring the permit 
applicant to limit emissions to levels stipulated in State regulations, 
the State permit also is used to implement the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency's regulations in Title 40, Code of Federal Regula- 
tions, Part 60, "Standards of Performance for Certain New Stationery 
Sources." Performance standards for particulate matter, carbon monoxide, 
and sulfur dioxide emissions from petroleum refineries are included in 
Subpart A of the Federal regulations and in Section 25-000.70, Chapter 
340 of the Oregon Administrative Rules. 

Waste Discharge Permit : Waste discharge permits prescribe limitations on 
the discharge o± wastes into public waters or elsewhere into the environ- 
ment in a manner that may affect the quality of public waters. If dis- 
charges into navigable waters are proposed, the State's permit also 
serves as the permit required under the U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency's regulations in 40 CFR 125 on the National Pollutant Discharge 
Elimination System. Permits for refineries are based on State water 
quality standards and EPA's Effluent Guidelines and Standards for 
Petroleum Refining Point Source Category (40 CFR 419) . 

Proponents of a refinery probably would also be required to prepare a 
Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Plan. The Environmental 
Protection Agency's regulations on "Oil Pollution Prevention in Non- 
Transportation Related Onshore and Offshore Facilities (40 CFR 112) 
require such a plan for non- transportation related facilities ". . . 
that have discharged or could reasonably be expected to discharge oil 
in harmful quantities, as defined in 40 CFR Part 110, into or upon the 
navigable waters of the United States or adjoining shorelines. . . ." 
Most refineries probably would be located at sites where there would 
be a reasonable expectation that harmful quantities of oil could be 
discharged . 



3^ 



References 

1. Vernon C. Newton, Jr., 1976. "Oil and Gas Exploration in 1975." 
The Ore Bin . Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. 
Vol. 38, No. 1, 609. 

2. . 1974. "Oil and Gas Exploration in 1973." 

The Ore Bin . Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. 
Vol. 36, No. 1, 4-8. 

3. F. J. Wagner. 1975. "North American Drilling Activity in 1974." 
Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists . 
Vol. 58, 1273. 

4. Ibid . 

5. Ibid . 

6. H. W. Menard and G. Sharman. 1975. "Scientific Uses of Random 
Drilling Models." Science . Vol. 190, No. 4212. 

7. Op. cit . 

8. Personal communication, William Lee, Conservation Division, U.S. 
Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA. 

9. Personal communication, John Fackler, Conservation Division, U.S. 
Geological Survey, Los Angeles, CA. 

10. Personal communication, Wally Sutherland, Conservation Division, 
U.S. Geological Survey, DEnver, CO. 

11. Oregon Revised Statutes 453.355. 

12. Personal communication, Vernon Newton, Oregon Department of Geology 
and Mineral Industries, Portland, OR. 

13. Ibid . 

14. Oregon Office of Energy Research and Planning. 1975. Transition : 
A Report to the Oregon Energy Council , p. 55. 

15. Personal communication, W. R. Vermeere, Oregon Department of 
Energy, Salem, OR. 



3(?£> 



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DSC LIBRARY 



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